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  1. The Absurd. [REVIEW]Bara Zraik - manuscript
    In this paper I explore the absurdity of Camus’s Sisyphus.
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  2. Albert Camus.Ronald Aronson - forthcoming - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  3. Ideology, History and Political Philosophy: Camus'l'homme Rèvoltè.Richard H. Cox - forthcoming - Social Research.
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  4. Camus’s Absurd and the Argument Against Suicide.Craig DeLancey - forthcoming - Philosophia:1-19.
    There are striking differences between Camus’s early and late philosophical essays, but Camus often claimed that his works were part of one consistent project. This paper argues that, although Camus had a significant change in his views on the consequences of the absurd, throughout his life he also had a common concern with the relation of the absurd to morality. Showing this requires us to clarify what Camus meant by the “absurd,” and identify at least three different uses of the (...)
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  5. Die Pest in Zeiten von Corona – Philosophie und Literatur bei Albert Camus.Nicola Mößner - forthcoming - Philokles.
  6. Camus' Challenge: The Question of Suicide (Is Life Worth Living).Kathleen O'Dwyer - forthcoming - Journal of Humanistic Psychology.
    In the opening essay of The Myth of Sisyphus and Other Essays, Camus states that ‘There is but one truly serious philosophical problem, and that is suicide. Judging whether life is or is not worth living amounts to answering the fundamental question of philosophy’ (Camus, 2005: 1). He argues that all the other questions of philosophy, dealing with truth, knowledge, ethics, science, language and so on, are necessarily secondary to this question: ‘I therefore conclude that the meaning of life is (...)
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  7. Jeffrey Isaac, Arendt, Camus and Modern Rebellion.M. Roberts - forthcoming - Radical Philosophy.
  8. The Augustinianism of Albert Camus' The Plague.Gene Fendt - 2020 - Heythrop Journal 61 (3):471-482.
    Camus himself called The Plague his most anti-Christian text, and most theologically oriented readings of the text agree. This paper shows how the sermons of Fr. Paneloux—an Augustine scholar--as well as Dr. Rieux’s mother present an Augustinian picture of love. This love opposes the passionate concupiscence for possession of things with the divine love which wishes for the constant conscious presence of the beloved in the light of the good. Such is possible for us, as Augustine exhibits and helps us (...)
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  9. A Critique of Humoristic Absurdism. Problematizing the Legitimacy of a Humoristic Disposition Toward the Absurd.Thom Hamer - 2020 - Utrecht: Utrecht University.
    To what extent can humorism be a legitimate disposition toward the Absurd? The Absurd is born from the insurmountable contradiction between one’s ceaseless striving and the absence of an ultimate resolution – or, as I prefer to call it, the ‘dissolution of resolution’. Humoristic Absurdism is the commitment to a pattern of humorous responses to the Absurd, which regard this absurd condition, as well as its manifestation in absurd situations, as a comical phenomenon. Although the humoristic disposition seems promising, by (...)
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  10. ‘Hopeless Love: Camus and Le Premier Homme.’.Marguerite La Caze - 2020 - In Matthew Sharpe, Maciej Kałuża & Peter Francev (eds.), Brill's Companion to Camus: Camus among the Philosophers,. Leiden: Brill. pp. 460-76..
    What does Le Premier Homme bring specifically to our understanding of Camus’s view of love? The novel allows us to understand love as love of specific human individuals, as well as love of life and the world, and a sense of the frailties of love. While many commentaries have touched on the idea of the importance of love in this work, they have tended to focus more on the disguised autobiographical elements concerning the people in Camus’s life. They have also (...)
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  11. The Meaning of Life and Death: Ten Classic Thinkers on the Ultimate Question, Michael Hauskeller, 2020. London, Bloomsbury Academic. Xv + 236 Pp. £ 45.50 (Hb) £ 13.99. [REVIEW]Lantz Fleming Miller - 2020 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 37 (4):681-683.
    This book is at once incisive and exploratory, interpretive and historic scholarship. It appeals to both general and specialized readers. It uniquely takes a common philosophical theme, the meaning of life, and traces it through many philosophers’ and novelists' works. Sometimes the theme is buried and implicit, and offers a plausible distillation of each author's view. The result is a title that may sound like a self-help book’s—except the contents expand in manifold directions rather than narrow to easy advice. The (...)
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  12. The Decency of Albert Camus.Jesus Deogracias Principe - 2020 - Renascence 72 (2):99-120.
    This essay explores the place of decency and the decent man in the moral and religious thought of Albert Camus. Focusing primarily on the major fictional works, we consider how Camus employs the semantic ambiguity inherent in the notion of being decent, and then develops this into a normative ethical call characterized by responsibility and solidarity. We then explore further how Camus pushes the envelope to make us reflect on whether decency is even possible, both in the sense of addressing (...)
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  13. Reason, Feeling, and Happiness: Bridging an Ancient/Modern Divide in The Plague.Gene Fendt - 2019 - Philosophy and Literature 43 (2):350-368.
    Camus is defined by many as an absurdist philosopher of revolt. The Plague, however, shows him working rigorously through a well-known division between ancient and modern ethics concerning the relation of reason, feeling and happiness. For Aristotle, the virtues are stable dispositions including affective and intellectual elements. For Kant, one’s particular feelings are either that from which we must abstract to judge moral worth, or are a constant hindrance to proper moral activity. Further, Kant claims “habit belongs to the physical (...)
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  14. Absurd Relations.Jacob Fox - 2019 - Human Affairs 29 (4):387-394.
    Absurdist accounts of life’s meaning posit that life is absurd because our pretensions regarding its meaning conflict with the actual or perceived reality of the situation. Relationary accounts posit that contingent things gain their meaning only from their relationship to other meaningful things. I take a detailed look at the two types of account, and, proceeding under the assumption that they are correct, combine them to see what the implications of such a combination might be. I conclude that another way (...)
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  15. Is Human Life Absurd?Billy Holmes - 2019 - Philosophia 47 (2):429-434.
    This essay examines whether or not absurdity is intrinsic to human life. It takes Camus’ interpretation of ‘The Absurd’ as its conceptual starting point. It traces such thought back to Schopenhauer, whose work is then critically analysed. This analysis focuses primarily on happiness and meaning. This essay accepts some of Schopenhauer’s premises, but rejects his conclusions. Instead, it considers Nietzsche’s alternatives and the role of suffering in life. It posits that suffering may help people acquire meaning and escape absurdity. It (...)
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  16. Ethics and Aesthetics of Non-Duality: Responses to Nihilism From Nietzsche to Camus.Adrian Moore - 2019 - Dissertation, The University of Queensland
  17. Why the Indifference of the Universe is Irrelevant to Life’s Meaning.Brooke Alan Trisel - 2019 - Human Affairs 29 (4):453-461.
    When pessimists claim that human life is meaningless, they often also assert that the universe is “blind to good and evil” and “indifferent to us”. How, if it all, is the indifference of the universe relevant to whether life is meaningful? To answer this question, and to know whether we should be concerned that the universe is indifferent, we need a clearer and deeper understanding of the concept of “cosmic indifference”, which I will seek to provide. I will argue that (...)
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  18. Rebellion and Authenticity The Artist and the Emergence of Meaning From Absurdity: An Aesthetic Examination of Sartre and Camus.James Podhorodecki - 2018 - Dissertation, Monash
    This thesis aims to explain why art is the ideal agent for overcoming the absurdity and the meaninglessness of existence. The focus is Camus’ Rebellion in conjunction with Sartre’s notion of Authenticity. Together they provide an adequate answer to the fundamental questions of human existence. Together Camus’ rebellion and Sartre’s authenticity provide the necessary foundations for the overall authenticity of art, facilitating the emergence of purpose from the abyss of absurdity.
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  19. Camus’ Feeling of the Absurd.Thomas Pölzler - 2018 - Journal of Value Inquiry 52 (4):477-490.
    Albert Camus is most famous for his engagement with the absurd. Both in his philosophical and literary works his main focus was on the nature and normative consequences of this idea. However, Camus was also concerned with what he referred to as the “feeling of the absurd”. Philosophers have so far paid little attention to Camus’ thoughts about the feeling of the absurd. In this paper I provide a detailed analysis of this feeling. It turns out that the feeling of (...)
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  20. Sartre, Camus and a Marxism for the 21st Century.David Schweikart - 2018 - Sartre Studies International 24 (2):1-24.
    Sartre, Camus, and a Marxism for the 21st Century.
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  21. Silence of the Idols: Appropriating the Myth of Sisyphus for Posthumanist Discourses.Steven Umbrello & Jessica Lombard - 2018 - Postmodern Openings 9 (4):98-121.
    Both current and past analyses and critiques of transhumanist and posthumanist theories have had a propensity to cite the Greek myth of Prometheus as a paradigmatic figure. Although stark differences exist amongst the token forms of posthumanist theories and transhumanism, both theoretical domains claim promethean theory as their own. There are numerous definitions of those two concepts: therefore, this article focuses on posthumanism thought. By first analyzing the appropriation of the myth in posthumanism, we show how the myth fails to (...)
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  22. Rethinking Existentialism.Jonathan Webber - 2018 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    Jonathan Webber articulates an original interpretation of existentialism as the ethical theory that human freedom is the foundation of all other values. Offering an original analysis of classic literary and philosophical works published by Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, and Frantz Fanon up until 1952, Webber's conception of existentialism is developed in critical contrast with central works by Albert Camus, Sigmund Freud, and Maurice Merleau-Ponty. -/- Presenting his arguments in an accessible and engaging style, Webber contends that Beauvoir and Sartre (...)
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  23. Camus and Nietzsche on Politics in an Age of Absurdity.Sean Derek Illing - 2017 - European Journal of Political Theory 16 (1):1474885114562977.
    This article examines the significance of Friedrich Nietzsche to Albert Camus’ concepts of absurdity and revolt. It rests on three related claims. First, that Nietzsche’s critique of metaphysics is the point of departure for Camus’ absurdist inquiries. Second, that Camus’ philosophy of revolt is informed in crucial ways by Nietzsche’s views on the sources of moral and intellectual authority in the modern world. Finally, that Camusian revolt is an attempt to deal with the political crisis of foundationalism in a way (...)
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  24. Quand "l'esprit rencontre la nuit": révolte et déraison selon Camus.Ramona Fotiade - 2016 - Cahiers de la Mediterrannee.
    An analysis of Camus' relationship to Lev Shestov and existential thought, with reference to Le Mythe de Sisyphe, L'Homme révolté, Camus' polemic with Fondane, and related notebooks, diaries and manuscript documents in private and public archival collections.
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  25. Solidarity and the Absurd in Kamel Daoud's Meursault, Contre-Enquête.Sarah Horton - 2016 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 24 (2):286-303.
    This article examines Kamel Daoud’s treatment of solidarity and the absurd in Meursault, contre-enquête and posits that the question of how to live in solidarity with others is central to the novel, although the word ‘solidarity’ never appears in it. After recalling Camus’s discussion of the absurd in Le Mythe de Sisyphe and of solidarity in L’Homme révolté, the article examines the manner in which Haroun, Daoud’s narrator and the brother of the Arab Meursault killed in L’Étranger, reveals his own (...)
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  26. Psychoanaliza życia, czyli Gaston Bachelard czyta Pieśni Maldorora.Marta Ples-Bęben - 2016 - Diametros 49:84-102.
    In 1939 Gaston Bachelard published a book Lautréamont on the poem The Songs of Maldoror by Isidore Ducasse. Bachelard’s Lautréamont was inspired by the method of psychoanalysis. The purpose of this article is to analyze Bachelard’s interpretation of the Chants, to compare his version of psychoanalysis with the versions of Freud and Jung, and to show its meaning in the historical and philosophical context.
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  27. Wie Schlüssig Ist Albert Camus’ Frühe „Logik des Absurden“?Thomas Pölzler - 2016 - Allgemeine Zeitschrift für Philosophie 41 (1):59-76.
    Im Roman „Der Fremde“, dem Drama „Caligula“ und insbesondere dem Essay „Der Mythos des Sisyphos“ entwickelt Albert Camus eine erste Fassung einer „Logik des Absurden“. Die menschliche Existenz sei geprägt durch ein Spannungsverhältnis zwischen unserem Streben nach Sinn und einer dieses Streben fortwährend enttäuschenden Welt. Auf die Erkenntnis dieser Tatsache darf man Camus zufolge weder mit Selbstmord noch mit dem Aufgeben des Strebens nach Sinn reagieren. Vielmehr fordert er eine Haltung der beständigen Auflehnung. In meinem Artikel gehe ich der Frage (...)
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  28. Art in the Face of the Absurd.Thomas Pölzler - 2016 - In Stefan Majetschak & Anja Weiberg (eds.), Contributions of the 39th International Wittgenstein Symposium. Austrian Ludwig Wittgenstein Society. pp. 196-198.
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  29. The Plague and the Panopticon: Camus, with and Against the Total Critiques of Modernity.Matthew Sharpe - 2016 - Thesis Eleven 133 (1):59-79.
    Albert Camus’s 1947 novel La Peste and 1948 drama L’État de Siège, allegories of totalitarian power using the figure of the plague, remarkably anticipate Foucault’s celebrated genealogical analyses of modern power. Indeed, reading Foucault after Camus highlights a fact little-remarked in Discipline and Punish: namely, that the famous chapter on the ‘Panopticon’ begins by analysing the measures taken in early modern Vincennes following the advent of plague. Part III argues that, although Camus was cited as an inspiration by the nouveaux (...)
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  30. Camus, Albert.David Simpson - 2016 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Albert Camus Albert Camus was a French-Algerian journalist, playwright, novelist, philosophical essayist, and Nobel laureate. Though he was neither by advanced training nor profession a philosopher, he nevertheless made important, forceful contributions to a wide range of issues in moral philosophy in his novels, reviews, articles, essays, and speeches—from terrorism and political violence to … Continue reading Camus, Albert →.
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  31. Albert Camus.David Simpson - 2016 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  32. Camus, Albert.David Simpson - 2016 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Albert Camus Albert Camus was a French-Algerian journalist, playwright, novelist, philosophical essayist, and Nobel laureate. Though he was neither by advanced training nor profession a philosopher, he nevertheless made important, forceful contributions to a wide range of issues in moral philosophy in his novels, reviews, articles, essays, and speeches—from terrorism and political violence to … Continue reading Camus, Albert →.
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  33. Why Things Matter: Camus' Meursault and Descartes' Causal Principle.Jani Sinokki - 2016 - In Hemmo Laiho & Arto Repo (eds.), DE NATURA RERUM - Scripta in honorem professoris Olli Koistinen sexagesimum annum complentis. Turku: University of Turku. pp. 59-73.
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  34. Chaos, Indifference and the Metaphysics of Absurdity: The Ethical Challenges Posed by Gare's Process Thought.Andrew Kirkpatrick - 2015 - Process Studies Supplement.
    The ecological crisis demonstrates the inadequacy of current modes of thought to grasp the nature of reality and to act accordingly. A more sophisticated metaphysical system is necessary. Arran Gare, a prominent Australian philosopher, has produced such a system, which takes into account the post modern sciences of non-linear thermodynamics, quantum mechanics, and complexity theory. The present article promotes a cosmology based on Gare's metaphysics. In contrast to modern science, the postmodern account offered here will come to terms with a (...)
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  35. Robert Zaretsky, A Life Worth Living: Albert Camus and the Quest for Meaning.Joseph Mahon - 2015 - Philosophy in Review 35 (4):231-234.
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  36. In Search of Enlightenment by Reading Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot.Syed Ismyl Mahmood Rizvi - 2015 - Literaria: An International Journal of New Literature Across the World 5 (1-2):37-55.
    Beckett’s philosophical indebtedness has long been recognised – especially in conjunction with Dante, Descartes and Geulincx. In this article, I examine Beckettian universal values of Enlightenment, which will be exposed as self-serving mystifications that rationalize and instrumentalize the meaning of life. In this context, the awareness of the Enlightenment nature of Beckett’s writing in Waiting for Godot will be analysed along with the freedom appeal of his reader as he strives to attain the enlightenment.
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  37. Camus, Philosophe: To Return to Our Beginnings.Matthew Sharpe - 2015 - Brill.
    In _Camus, Philosophe: To Return to our Beginnings_ Matthew Sharpe reads Camus as a _philosophe_ in the classical and enlightenment lineages, arguing that his defense of _mesure_ singles him out amidst 20th century French thought and makes him of renewed relevance today.
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  38. Creating Albert Camus: Foundations and Explorations of His Philosophy of Communication.Brent C. Sleasman (ed.) - 2015 - Fairleigh Dickinson University Press.
    Creating Albert Camus: Foundations & Explorations in his Philosophy of Communication contributes to the study of the philosophy of communication by solidifying the place of Albert Camus within human communication studies. The major claim within Creating Albert Camus is that Camus serves as a philosopher of communication for the twenty-first century and can contribute to the growing conversation about the philosophy of communication in our contemporary age.
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  39. Sisifo e l'Assurdo, o della vita innocente.Fabio Vergine - 2015 - In Filosofia E. Nuovi Sentieri (ed.), Albert Camus: l'eredità di un pensatore scomodo. Morrisville, Carolina del Nord, Stati Uniti: pp. 486-509.
    "Sisifo e l'Assurdo, o della vita innocente", in AA. VV, Albert Camus. L'eredità di un pensatore scomodo, a cura di "Filosofia e Nuovi Sentieri".
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  40. Esculpir em Argila - Albert Camus: uma estética da existência.Gabriel Ferreira da Silva - 2014 - Educ.
    A imagem do “esculpir em Argila” como modo de enfrentamento do absurdo, usada por Camus, serve de motto para Gabriel Ferreira da Silva apontar a resposta de Camus ao niilismo do absurdo e de sua falsa solução, o suicídio, tal como é abordado em O Mito de Sísifo. A passagem do “mito” à “revolta” de O Homem Revoltado indica a rota de sua ética da paixão. Esse ato estético de “esculpir”, numa matéria finita e frágil, o sentido possível (estabelecendo a (...)
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  41. Albert Camus : la voie d'un moraliste.Jean-Baptiste Dussert - 2014 - In Ana Clara Santos, Maria Celeste Natário, Maria de Jesus Cabral, Maria Luísa Malato & Renato Epifânio (eds.), L'exil et le royaume : d'Albert Camus à Vergílio Ferreira. Le Manuscrit.
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  42. Albert Camus’ Critique of Modernity.William E. Duvall - 2014 - The European Legacy 19 (5):646-647.
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  43. L’Ordre Libertaire: La Vie Philosophique D’Albert Camus.William E. Duvall - 2014 - The European Legacy 19 (5):647-648.
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  44. Absurdism as Self-Help: Resolving an Essential Inconsistency in Camus’ Early Philosophy.Thomas Pölzler - 2014 - Journal of Camus Studies 2014:91-102.
    Camus’ early philosophy has been subject to various kinds of criticism. In this paper I address a problem that has not been noticed so far, namely that it appears to be essentially inconsistent. On the one hand, Camus explicitly denies the existence of moral values, and construes his central notion of the absurd in a way that presupposes this denial. On the other hand, he is also committed to the existence of certain values. Both in his literary and philosophical works (...)
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  45. Anselm on Human Finitude: A Dialogue with Existentialism.Eileen C. Sweeney - 2014 - Saint Anselm Journal 10 (1).
    The paper discusses Anselm's account of human finitude and freedom through his discussion of what it means to receive what we have from God in De casu diaboli. The essay argues that Anselm is considering the same issue as Jean Paul Sartre in his account of receiving a gift as incompatible with freedom. De casu diaboli takes up this same question, asking about how the finite will can be free, which requires that it have something per se, when there is (...)
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  46. Camus: Between Yes and No.Ray Boisvert - 2013 - Philosophy Now 98:8-10.
  47. Albert Camus and the Political Philosophy of the Absurd: Ambivalence, Resistance, and Creativity.Matthew H. Bowker - 2013 - Lexington Books.
    In Albert Camus and the Political Philosophy of the Absurd: Ambivalence, Resistance, and Creativity, Matthew H. Bowker takes an interdisciplinary approach to Albert Camus’ political philosophy by reading absurdity itself as a metaphor for the psychosocial dynamics of ambivalence, resistance, integration, and creativity. Decoupling absurdity from its ontological aspirations and focusing instead on its psychological and phenomenal contours, Bowker discovers an absurdist foundation for ethical and political practice.
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  48. Albert Camus and Rebellious Cosmopolitanism in a Divided World.Patrick Hayden - 2013 - Journal of International Political Theory 9 (2):194-219.
    Albert Camus's existential thinking has been the object of renewed interest over the past decade. Political theorists have looked to his work to shed light on the contradictions and violence of modernity and the dynamics of postcolonial justice. This article contends that Camus's account of the modern human condition provides a means of engaging critically with one of the most compelling ideas linked to thinking about global politics today: cosmopolitanism. By developing Camus's position on absurdity and rebellion, it suggests that (...)
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  49. Albert Camus "“ Ein Cartesianer des Absurden?".Christoph Kann - 2013 - In Willi Jung (ed.), Albert Camus Oder der Glückliche Sisyphos €“ Albert Camus Ou Sisyphe Heureux. Bonn University Press. pp. 53--72.
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  50. Camus' Askesis : Reading Camus in Light of the Carnets (and His L'Impromptu des Philosophes).Matthew Sharpe - 2013 - Philosophical Practice 8 (1):1149-1164.
1 — 50 / 257