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  1. added 2020-05-25
    Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation in Alzheimer's Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment—A State-of-the-Art Review on Methodological Characteristics and Stimulation Parameters.Adrienn Holczer, Viola Luca Németh, Teodóra Vékony, László Vécsei, Péter Klivényi & Anita Must - 2020 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 14.
  2. added 2020-05-21
    Addressing Ethical Challenges of Disclosure in Dementia Prediction: Limitations of Current Guidelines and Suggestions to Proceed.Zümrüt Alpinar-Sencan & Silke Schicktanz - 2020 - BMC Medical Ethics 21 (1):1-11.
    BackgroundBiomarker research is gaining increasing attention focusing on the preclinical stages of the disease. Such interest requires special attention for communication and disclosure in clinical contexts. Many countries give dementia a high health policy priority by developing national strategies and by improving guidelines addressing disclosure of a diagnosis; however, risk communication is often neglected.Main textThis paper aims to identify the challenges of disclosure in the context of dementia prediction and to find out whether existing clinical guidelines sufficiently address the issues (...)
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  3. added 2020-05-15
    Reconceiving Conceptual Vehicles: Lessons From Semantic Dementia.Joseph McCaffrey - 2015 - Philosophical Psychology 28 (3):337-354.
    What are the vehicles of conceptual thought? Recently, cognitive scientists and philosophers of psychology have developed quite different theories about what kinds of representations concepts are. At one extreme, amodal theories claim that concepts are representations whose vehicles are distinct from those used in perceptual processes. At the other end of the spectrum, neo-empiricism proposes that concepts are perceptual representations grounded in the mind's sensory, motor, and affective systems. In this essay, I examine how evidence from the neuropsychological disorder semantic (...)
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  4. added 2020-05-14
    Informed Consent in Two Alzheimer’s Disease Research Centers: Insights From Research Coordinators.Christine M. Suver, Jennifer K. Hamann, Erin M. Chin, Felicia C. Goldstein, Hanna M. Blazel, Cecelia M. Manzanares, Megan J. Doerr, Sanjay J. Asthana, Lara M. Mangravite, Allan I. Levey, James J. Lah & Dorothy F. Edwards - 2020 - Ajob Empirical Bioethics 11 (2):114-124.
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  5. added 2020-05-08
    Response To: ‘Dementia and Advance Directives: Some Empirical and Normative Concerns’ by Jongsma Et Al.Scott Y. H. Kim, David Gibbes Miller & Rebecca Dresser - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (2):95-96.
    We are grateful to Jongsma et al 1 for their interest in our article analysing the case of ‘Mrs A’, a Dutch woman with Alzheimer’s disease who received euthanasia based on her advance euthanasia directive.2 Their commentary criticises two elements of our analysis. First, the authors believe our reasons for doubting that Mrs A had the capacity to write and revise an AED rely on ‘partial’ empirical data and rest on normative errors. Second, they use two of our statements to (...)
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  6. added 2020-05-08
    An Integrative Memory Model of Recollection and Familiarity to Understand Memory Deficits.Christine Bastin, Gabriel Besson, Jessica Simon, Emma Delhaye, Marie Geurten, Sylvie Willems & Eric Salmon - 2019 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 42.
    Humans can recollect past events in details and/or know that an object, person, or place has been encountered before. During the last two decades, there has been intense debate about how recollection and familiarity are organized in the brain. Here, we propose an integrative memory model which describes the distributed and interactive neurocognitive architecture of representations and operations underlying recollection and familiarity. In this architecture, the subjective experience of recollection and familiarity arises from the interaction between core systems and an (...)
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  7. added 2020-05-08
    Advance Euthanasia Directives: A Controversial Case and its Ethical Implications.David Gibbes Miller, Rebecca Dresser & Scott Y. H. Kim - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (2):84-89.
    Authorising euthanasia and assisted suicide with advance euthanasia directives is permitted, yet debated, in the Netherlands. We focus on a recent controversial case in which a Dutch woman with Alzheimer’s disease was euthanised based on her AED. A Dutch euthanasia review committee found that the physician performing the euthanasia failed to follow due care requirements for euthanasia and assisted suicide. This case is notable because it is the first case to trigger a criminal investigation since the 2002 Dutch euthanasia law (...)
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  8. added 2020-05-08
    On Legalizing Physician‐Assisted Death for Dementia.Rebecca Dresser - 2017 - Hastings Center Report 47 (4):5-6.
    Last November, soon after Colorado became the latest state to authorize physician-assisted suicide, National Public Radio's The Diane Rehm Show devoted a segment to legalization of “physician assistance in dying,” a label that refers to both physician-assisted suicide and voluntary active euthanasia. Although the segment initially focused on PAD in the context of terminal illness in general, it wasn't long before PAD's potential application to dementia patients came up. A caller said that her mother had Alzheimer's disease and was being (...)
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  9. added 2020-05-08
    Is Preventive Suicide a Rational Response to a Presymptomatic Diagnosis of Dementia?Russell Powell - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (8):511-512.
    It may soon be possible to diagnose neurodegenerative disorders, such as early onset Alzheimer's disease, with a high degree of accuracy well before these conditions become symptomatic. In a carefully argued and thought-provoking piece, Dena Davis maintains that preemptive suicide may be a rational option for those confronted with a preclinical diagnosis of impending dementia, and consequently that withholding the results of dementia research until effective treatments become available constitutes an unjustified infringement on patient autonomy. If suicide is indeed a (...)
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  10. added 2020-05-08
    Storytelling in Dementia: Embodiment as a Resource.Lars-Christer Hydén - 2013 - Dementia 12:359-367.
    In narrative research about persons with dementia, much research focuses on individual storytellers and their stories often stressing the discursive or textual aspects of stories. As persons with Alzheimer’s disease generally have difficulties in telling stories according to often implicit narrative norms, they may appear to be less competent and agentive than what is actually the case. In the article, I argue for a change of focus from the textual aspects of narratives and the story as a product, to a (...)
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  11. added 2020-05-08
    Cellular Source-Specific Effects of Apolipoprotein E4 on Dendrite Arborization and Dendritic Spine Development.S. Jain, S. Y. Yoon, L. Leung, J. Knoferle & Y. Huang - unknown
    Apolipoprotein E4 is the leading genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease, and it has a gene dose-dependent effect on the risk and age of onset of AD. Although apoE4 is primarily produced by astrocytes in the brain, neurons can also produce apoE4 under stress conditions. ApoE4 is known to inhibit neurite outgrowth and spine development in vitro and in vivo, but the potential influence of apoE4's cellular source on dendritic arborization and spine development has not yet been investigated. In this (...)
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  12. added 2020-05-08
    Apolipoprotein E4 Causes Age- and Sex-Dependent Impairments of Hilar GABAergic Interneurons and Learning and Memory Deficits in Mice.L. Leung, Y. Andrews-Zwilling, S. Y. Yoon, S. Jain, K. Ring, J. Dai, M. M. Wang, L. Tong, D. Walker & Y. Huang - unknown
    Apolipoprotein E4 is the major genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease. ApoE4 has sex-dependent effects, whereby the risk of developing AD is higher in apoE4-expressing females than males. However, the mechanism underlying the sex difference, in relation to apoE4, is unknown. Previous findings indicate that apoE4 causes age-dependent impairments of hilar GABAergic interneurons in female mice, leading to learning and memory deficits. Here, we investigate whether the detrimental effects of apoE4 on hilar GABAergic interneurons are sex-dependent using apoE knock-in mice (...)
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  13. added 2020-05-08
    Identification of Common Variants Influencing Risk of the Tauopathy Progressive Supranuclear Palsy.G. U. Höglinger, N. M. Melhem, D. W. Dickson, P. M. A. Sleiman, L. S. Wang, L. Klei, R. Rademakers, R. De Silva, I. Litvan, J. C. de RileyVan Swieten, P. Heutink, Z. K. Wszolek, R. J. Uitti, J. Vandrovcova, H. I. Hurtig, R. G. Gross, W. Maetzler, S. Goldwurm, E. Tolosa, B. Borroni, P. Pastor, L. B. Cantwell, M. R. Han, A. Dillman, M. P. Van Der Brug, Gibbs Jr, M. R. Cookson, D. G. Hernandez, A. B. Singleton, M. J. Farrer, C. E. Yu, L. I. Golbe, T. Revesz, J. Hardy, A. J. Lees, B. Devlin, H. Hakonarson, U. Müller, G. D. Schellenberg, R. L. Albin, E. Alonso, A. Antonini, M. Apfelbacher, S. E. Arnold, J. Avila, T. G. Beach, S. Beecher, D. Berg, T. D. Bird, N. Bogdanovic, A. J. W. Boon, Y. Bordelon, A. Brice, H. Budka, M. Canesi, W. Z. Chiu, R. Cilia, C. Colosimo, P. P. De Deyn, J. G. De Yebenes, L. D. Kaat, R. Duara, A. Durr, S. Engelborghs, G. Fabbrini, N. A. Finch, R. Flook, M. P. Frosch, C. Gaig, D. R. Galasko, T. Gasser, M. Gearing, E. T. Geller, B. Ghetti, N. R. Graff-Radford, M. Grossman, L. N. da HallHazrati, M. Höllerhage, J. Jankovic, J. L. Juncos & Karydas - unknown
    Progressive supranuclear palsy is a movement disorder with prominent tau neuropathology. Brain diseases with abnormal tau deposits are called tauopathies, the most common of which is Alzheimer's disease. Environmental causes of tauopathies include repetitive head trauma associated with some sports. To identify common genetic variation contributing to risk for tauopathies, we carried out a genome-wide association study of 1,114 individuals with PSP and 3,247 controls followed by a second stage in which we genotyped 1,051 cases and 3,560 controls for the (...)
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  14. added 2020-05-08
    Beyond the Signaling Effect Role of Amyloid-Ss42 on the Processing of APP, and its Clinical Implications.D. K. Lahiri & B. Maloney - 2010 - Exp Neurol 225:51-4.
    Alzheimer's disease currently has over 6 million victims in the USA, alone. The recently FDA approved drugs for AD only provide mild, transient relief for symptoms without addressing underlying mechanisms to a significant extent. Basic understanding of the activities of the amyloid beta peptide and associated proteins such as beta-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 is necessary to develop effective medical responses to AD. Recently , Tabaton et al. have presented a model of both non-pathological and pathological Abeta activities and suggest potential (...)
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  15. added 2020-05-08
    Co-Localization and Distribution of Cerebral APP and SP1 and its Relationship to Amyloidogenesis.B. Brock, R. Basha, K. DiPalma, A. Anderson, G. J. Harry, D. C. Rice, B. Maloney, D. K. Lahiri & N. H. Zawia - 2008 - J Alzheimers Dis 13:71-80.
    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by amyloid-beta peptide -loaded plaques in the brain. Abeta is a cleavage fragment of amyloid-beta protein precursor and over production of APP may lead to amyloidogenesis. The regulatory region of the APP gene contains consensus sites recognized by the transcription factor, specificity protein 1 , which has been shown to be required for the regulation of APP and Abeta. To understand the role of SP1 in APP biogenesis, herein we have characterized the relative distribution and localization (...)
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  16. added 2020-05-08
    Transcriptional Regulation of Beta-Secretase by P25/Cdk5 Leads to Enhanced Amyloidogenic Processing.Y. Wen, W. H. Yu, B. Maloney, J. Bailey, J. Ma, I. Marie, T. Maurin, L. Wang, H. Figueroa, M. Herman, P. Krishnamurthy, L. Liu, E. Planel, L. F. Lau, D. K. Lahiri & K. Duff - 2008 - Neuron 57:680-90.
    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 has been implicated in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis. Here, we demonstrate that overexpression of p25, an activator of cdk5, led to increased levels of BACE1 mRNA and protein in vitro and in vivo. A p25/cdk5 responsive region containing multiple sites for signal transducer and activator of transcription was identified in the BACE1 promoter. STAT3 interacts with the BACE1 promoter, and p25-overexpressing mice had elevated levels of pSTAT3 and BACE1, whereas cdk5-deficient mice had reduced levels. Furthermore, mice with a (...)
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  17. added 2020-05-08
    Exposure to Lead and the Developmental Origin of Oxidative DNA Damage in the Aging Brain.C. M. Bolin, R. Basha, D. Cox, N. H. Zawia, B. Maloney, D. K. Lahiri & F. Cardozo-Pelaez - 2006 - Faseb J 20:788-90.
    Oxidative damage to DNA has been associated with neurodegenerative diseases. Developmental exposure to lead has been shown to elevate the Alzheimer's disease related beta-amyloid peptide , which is known to generate reactive oxygen species in the aging brain. This study measures the lifetime cerebral 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine levels and the activity of the DNA repair enzyme 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase in rats developmentally exposed to Pb. Oxo8dG was transiently modulated early in life , but was later elevated 20 months after exposure to Pb (...)
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  18. added 2020-05-08
    Functional Domains of the BACE1 and BACE2 Promoters and Mechanisms of Transcriptional Suppression of the BACE2 Promoter in Normal Neuronal Cells. [REVIEW]D. K. Lahiri, B. Maloney & Y. W. Ge - 2006 - J Mol Neurosci 29:65-80.
    The beta-amyloid protein present in the neuritic plaques of Alzheimer's disease is cleaved from Abeta precursor protein by beta- and gamma-secretases. Following identification of beta-APP cleaving enzyme as the beta-secretase, a homologous beta-secretase 2 was described. Our goal is to characterize the regulatory region of the BACE genes. We compare functional domains within the BACE1 and BACE2 regulatory regions. Both BACE genes lack canonical TATAand CAAT boxes, but they contain distinguishing transcription start sites and transcription factor-binding sites. The BACE1 sequence (...)
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  19. added 2020-05-08
    'Functional Characterization of the 5' Flanking Region of the BACE Gene: Identification of a 91 Bp Fragment Involved in Basal Level of BACE Promoter Expression. [REVIEW]Y. W. Ge, B. Maloney, K. Sambamurti & D. K. Lahiri - 2004 - Faseb J 18:1037-9.
    Pathological characteristics of Alzheimer's disease include amyloid-beta plaques. Abeta is derived from the Abeta peptide precursor protein by gamma- and beta-secretases, the latter known as beta-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 . We have also described potentially important regions in the promoter of BACE, which may regulate its activity . Herein, we have functionally dissected the regulatory regions within the BACE promoter into areas containing positive and negative regulatory elements. The 4.1 kb promoter region includes positive regulatory element in the -2975 to (...)
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  20. added 2020-05-08
    A Molecular Switch in Amyloid Assembly: Met 35 and Amyloid Β-Protein Oligomerization.G. Bitan, B. Tarus, S. S. Vollers, H. A. Lashuel, M. M. Condron, J. E. Straub & D. B. Teplow - unknown
    Aberrant protein oligomerization is an important pathogenetic process in vivo. In Alzheimer's disease, the amyloid β-protein forms neurotoxic oligomers. The predominant in vivo Aβ alloforms, Aβ40 and Aβ42, have distinct oligomerization pathways. Aβ42 monomers oligomerize into pentamer/hexamer units which self-associate to form larger oligomers. Aβ40 does not form these paranuclei, a fact which may explain the particularly strong linkage of Aβ42 with AD. Here, we sought to determine the structural elements controlling paranucleus formation as a first step toward the development (...)
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  21. added 2020-05-08
    Surrogate Decision Making for Severely Cognitively Impaired Research Subjects: The Continuing Debate.Evan DeRenzo - 1994 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 3 (4):539.
    As research into Alzheimer's disease and other dementing disorders becomes more complex, risky, invasive, and commonplace, the need intensifies for discussion of the ethics of involving persons with dementia in research, specifically research of greater than minimal risk and of no expected direct benefit to the subject. Reviewing such studies pushes our traditional analysis tools to their limits. Simply balancing and prioritizing the basic ethical principles of respect for persons, beneficence, and justice that serves us well in reviewing the vast (...)
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  22. added 2020-05-01
    The Problem of Proxies with Interests of Their Own.John Hardwig - unknown
    A 78 year old married woman with progressive Alzheimer's disease was admitted to a local hospital with pneumonia and other medical problems. She recognized no one and had been incontinent for about a year. Despite aggressive treatment, the pneumonia failed to resolve and it seemed increasingly likely that this admission was to be for terminal care. The patient's husband (who had been taking care of her in their home) began requesting that the doctors be less aggressive in her treatment and, (...)
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  23. added 2020-05-01
    Dementia Beyond Pathology: What People Diagnosed Can Teach Us About Our Shared Humanity.Steven Sabat - 2019 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 16 (2):163-172.
    In this article, I explore how methods of investigation can allow us either to appreciate the intact cognitive and social abilities of people with Alzheimer’s disease or unwittingly obscure those same abilities. Specifically, I shall assert that the biomedical- quantitative approach, while being generally appropriate for drug efficacy studies, does not allow us to appreciate the many significant strengths possessed by people diagnosed with dementia, qualitative/narrative approaches do so admirably, and understanding the cognitive and social strengths of people diagnosed is (...)
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  24. added 2020-05-01
    The Liminal World of Dementia.Miles Little & Phoebe Vincent - 2019 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 16 (2):193-194.
    Dementia progressively isolates sufferers from their loved ones, who continue to search for meanings in their actions and words. As the condition progresses, meaning becomes harder and harder to find. Yet the actions of the sufferer may contain patterns, hinting at meanings that tempt observers to interpret from their own standpoint. We report the patterns repeated by a sufferer from Alzheimer's disease, artistic arrangements that take time to make, and appeal to observers. To the sufferer, these arrangements seem to have (...)
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  25. added 2020-05-01
    When Patients' Values Challenge Professional Integrity: Which Way Out?Marta Spranzi - 2016 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 59 (3):326-336.
    An elderly patient in his early eighties is hospitalized in a long-term facility, with advanced Alzheimer disease. He is otherwise relatively strong and free from other life-threatening conditions, except for the fact that he has difficulties swallowing. After several episodes of acute aspiration pneumonia doctors prescribe “strict fast”: only hydration through an IV catheter should be administered during the night, in order to relieve the feeling of hunger, provide comfort, and stave off death. The patient is surrounded by a warm (...)
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  26. added 2020-05-01
    Longitudinal Relationship of Low Leisure Satisfaction but Not Depressive Symptoms with Systemic Low-Grade Inflammation in Dementia Caregivers.R. Von Känel, B. T. Mausbach, P. J. Mills, J. E. Dimsdale, T. L. Patterson, S. Ancoli-Israel, M. G. Ziegler, M. Allison, E. A. Chattillion & I. Grant - unknown
    Objectives.This study aimed to further elucidate the biobehavioral mechanisms linking dementia caregiving with an increased cardiovascular disease risk. We hypothesized that both elevated depressive symptoms and a behavioral correlate of depression, low leisure satisfaction, are associated with systemic inflammation.Method.We studied 121 elderly Alzheimer's disease caregivers who underwent 4 annual assessments for depressive symptoms, leisure satisfaction, and circulating levels of inflammatory markers. We used mixed-regression analyses controlling for sociodemographic and health-relevant covariates to examine longitudinal relationships between constructs of interest.Results.There were inverse (...)
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  27. added 2020-05-01
    Neuropsychological Criteria for Mild Cognitive Impairment Improves Diagnostic Precision, Biomarker Associations, and Progression Rates.M. W. Bondi, E. C. Edmonds, A. J. Jak, L. R. Clark, L. Delano-Wood, C. R. McDonald, D. J. da NationLibon, R. Au, D. Galasko & D. P. Salmon - unknown
    © 2014 - IOS Press and the authors. All rights reserved.We compared two methods of diagnosing mild cognitive impairment : conventional Petersen/Winblad criteria as operationalized by the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative and an actuarial neuropsychological method put forward by Jak and Bondi designed to balance sensitivity and reliability. 1,150 ADNI participants were diagnosed at baseline as cognitively normal or MCI via ADNI criteria or Jak/Bondi criteria, and the two MCI samples were submitted to cluster and discriminant function analyses. Resulting cluster (...)
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  28. added 2020-05-01
    ‘Journeys’ in the Life-Writing of Adult-Child Dementia Caregivers.Martina Zimmermann - 2013 - Journal of Medical Humanities 34 (3):385-397.
    This article explores how Alzheimer’s disease caregivers struggle under the impact of a parent’s memory loss on their own personality. In particular, it analyses how caregivers perceive and, thus, present their experiences of the ever intensifying caregiving activity in terms of a ‘journey’. In doing so, this work takes into account both the patient’s continuing bodily as well as cognitive decline and its intricately linked influence on the caregiver’s physical and emotional stability. Equally, this study investigates how caregivers portray memory (...)
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  29. added 2020-05-01
    Social Justice, Health Disparities, and Culture in the Care of the Elderly.Peggye Dilworth-Anderson, Geraldine Pierre & Tandrea S. Hilliard - 2012 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (1):26-32.
    Older minority Americans experience worse health outcomes than their white counterparts, exhibiting the need for social justice in all areas of their health care. Justice, fairness, and equity are crucial to minimizing conditions that adversely affect the health of individuals and communities. In this paper, Alzheimer's disease (AD) is used as an example of a health care disparity among elderly Americans that requires social justice interventions. Cultural factors play a crucial role in AD screening, diagnosis, and access to care, and (...)
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  30. added 2020-05-01
    In Search of `the Good Life' for Demented Elderly.Maartje Schermer - 2003 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 6 (1):35-44.
    It may seem paradoxical to speak of the ‘goodlife’ for demented elderly. Many people consider dementia to be a life-wrecking disease and nursing homes to be terrible places. Still, it is relevant to ask how we can make life as good as possible for demented nursing home residents. This paper explores what three standard philosophical accounts of well-being — subjective preference theory, objectivist theories, and hedonism — have to say about the good life for demented people. It is concluded that (...)
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  31. added 2020-04-30
    Diagnosis and Management of Dementia in Primary Care at an Early Stage: The Need for a New Concept and an Adapted Procedure.Jan De Lepeleire & Jan Heyrman - 1999 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 20 (3):213-226.
    Diagnosis of dementia in primary care is both difficult and important. The recommendations by several authors to improve the diagnosis of dementia by general practitioners are important, but insufficient. It is argued that perhaps the disease concept in itself is a cause of confusion for clinicians. Primary care physicians need an adapted procedure, gradually leading to the final diagnosis of dementia. It has to be a stepwise labelling strategy, using global descriptions and non-disease specific labels in the beginning, ending up (...)
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  32. added 2020-04-29
    "Losing My Self": A Poet's Ironies and a Daughter's Reflections on Dementia.Sharon R. Kaufman - 2018 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 60 (4):549-568.
    I think that Alzheimer's disease and all neurological disabilities of this kind, degenerative conditions, are of the most intense intellectual interest and importance … because these people are taking us to places we would rather not think about and what these people have to say—to the degree that they can say anything at all—should teach us something about what a person is, what human identity is.What could it mean in general to say that possible ways to be a person can (...)
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  33. added 2020-04-29
    Editorial Note.Rebecca Kukla - 2017 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 27 (1):vii-ix.
    How can we conceptualize and promote agential choices in a complicated social world—one in which institutional, cultural, and marketing pressures convey values and norms that may not be in the best interest of individual patients? In this issue of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal, Eric Racine and his colleagues explore this difficult question in the context of “preclinical” Alzheimer’s disease and complementary and alternative medicines. This is an especially murky and vexed context in which to think about patient agency, (...)
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  34. added 2020-04-29
    It's Not NICE to Discriminate.J. Harris - 2005 - Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (7):373-375.
    NICE must not say people are not worth treatingThe National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence has proposed that drugs for the treatment of dementia be banned to National Health Service patients on the grounds that their cost is too high and “outside the range of cost effectiveness that might be considered appropriate for the NHS”i.1This is despite NICE’s admission that these drugs are effective in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease and despite NICE having approved even more expensive treatments. The (...)
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  35. added 2020-04-28
    Narrative Production in Low-Educated Individuals with Alzheimer’s Disease and its Relation to Cognitive and Brain Volume Measures.Lilian Hübner, Alexandre Nikolaev, Anderson Smidarle, Yawu Liu, Gustavo Cardoso, Vitor Monticelli, Jungmoon Hyun, Wyllians Borelli, Gislaine Jerônimo, Yves Joanette, Lucas Schilling & Fernanda Loureiro - 2018 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 12.
  36. added 2020-04-28
    Patient Representation and Advocacy for Alzheimer Disease in Germany and Israel.Silke Schicktanz, Nitzan Rimon-Zarfaty, Aviad Raz & Karin Jongsma - 2018 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 15 (3):369-380.
    This paper analyses self-declared aims and representation of dementia patient organizations and advocacy groups in relation to two recent upheavals: the critique of social stigmatization and biomedical research focusing on prediction. Based on twenty-six semi-structured interviews conducted in 2016–2017 with members, service recipients, and board representatives of POs in Germany and Israel, a comparative analysis was conducted, based on a grounded theory approach, to detect emerging topics within and across the POs and across national contexts. We identified a heterogeneous landscape, (...)
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  37. added 2020-04-28
    Cognitive Aging: What We Fear and What We Know.I. I. Dan G. Blazer - 2018 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 60 (4):569-582.
    Among the abilities people fear they will lose as they age, the most frequently reported is "staying sharp". The fear of being afflicted with Alzheimer's disease and other dementing disorders, which will clinically impact 10 to 12% of the population between the age of 65 and death, is the major concern. Despite the fear of losing their minds, most persons will not develop Alzheimer's disease. So why does the fear of losing mental acuity top the AARP list?One reason is that (...)
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  38. added 2020-04-28
    Still Gloria: Personal Identity and Dementia.Françoise Baylis - 2017 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 10 (1):210-224.
    Beverly Beckham writes in the Boston Globe in praise of Lisa Genova’s Still Alice: “You have to get this book. … I couldn’t put it down. …” After I read Still Alice, a book of fiction about an accomplished Harvard professor with early-onset Alzheimer’s disease, I too wanted to tell everyone to get this book, but not because “I couldn’t put it down.” The first time I read it, I put it down several times to cry. It was too painful (...)
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  39. added 2020-04-28
    The Dangers of Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Testing for Alzheimer’s Disease: Comment on “Personal Genomic Testing, Genetic Inheritance, and Uncertainty”.Paul Lacaze, Jane Tiller & Joanne Ryan - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (4):585-587.
    The overarching issue with this case study is poor regulation and quality control over direct-to-consumer genetic testing, delivered in the absence of any medical oversight.
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  40. added 2020-04-28
    There Are All Kinds of Rights.Paul S. Appelbaum - 2016 - Hastings Center Report 46 (2):inside back cover-inside back co.
    Some years ago I received a phone call telling me that my mother, then in her eighties, had been found wandering the street outside her home. It was the first indication my wife and I had of Alzheimer's disease. We arrived to discover that my mother was incoherent, with the house in disorder, bills unpaid, and perishable food in the night table rather than the refrigerator. Having spent much of my career trying to improve the assessment of decisional capacity, in (...)
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  41. added 2020-04-28
    Pragmatic Function Impairment and Alzheimer’s Dementia.Sara Schatz & Melvin González-Rivera - 2016 - Pragmatics and Cognition 23 (2):324-342.
    Pragmatic competence includes the capacity to express illocutionary force and successfully achieve perlocutionary effects, in order to guarantee fully functional communication exchanges. Alzheimer’s Disease is characterized by a constellation of limitations derived from progressive cognitive impairment, which is usually viewed as a global uniform phenomenon. In this paper it is argued that looking independently at the loss and recovery of pragmatic function related to illocutionary and perlocutionary abilities can be a productive way of understanding the progressive deterioration of communicative capacities (...)
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  42. added 2020-04-28
    Making Death Matter : A Feminist Technoscience Study of Alzheimer's Sciences in the Laboratory.Tara Mehrabi - unknown
    This thesis is a contribution to feminist laboratory studies and a critical engagement with the natural sciences, or more precisely research on the biochemical workings and deadly relations of Alzheimer’s disease emanating from a year of field work in a Drosophila fly lab. The natural sciences have been a point of fascination within the field of gender studies for decades. Such sciences produce knowledge on what gets to count as nature and natural, healthy or sick, normal or not, and they (...)
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  43. added 2020-04-28
    A Reanalysis of Cognitive-Functional Performance in Older Adults: Investigating the Interaction Between Normal Aging, Mild Cognitive Impairment, Mild Alzheimer's Disease Dementia, and Depression.Jonas J. de Paula, Maria A. Bicalho, Rafaela T. Ávila, Marco T. G. Cintra, Breno S. Diniz, Marco A. Romano-Silva & Leandro F. Malloy-Diniz - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  44. added 2020-04-28
    Resting State Functional Connectivity Differences Between Behavioral Variant Frontotemporal Dementia and Alzheimer's Disease.Anne Hafkemeijer, Christiane Möller, Elise G. P. Dopper, Lize C. Jiskoot, Tijn M. Schouten, John C. van Swieten, Wiesje M. van der Flier, Hugo Vrenken, Yolande A. L. Pijnenburg, Frederik Barkhof, Philip Scheltens, Jeroen van der Grond & Serge A. R. B. Rombouts - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  45. added 2020-04-28
    Parallel ICA of FDG-PET and PiB-PET in Three Conditions with Underlying Alzheimer's Pathology.R. Laforce, D. Tosun, P. Ghosh, M. Lehmann, C. M. Madison, M. W. Weiner, B. L. Miller, W. J. Jagust & G. D. Rabinovici - unknown
    The relationships between clinical phenotype, β-amyloid deposition and neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease are incompletely understood yet have important ramifications for future therapy. The goal of this study was to utilize multimodality positron emission tomography data from a clinically heterogeneous population of patients with probable AD in order to: identify spatial patterns of Aβ deposition measured by -labeled Pittsburgh Compound B and glucose metabolism measured by FDG-PET that correlate with specific clinical presentation and explore associations between spatial patterns of Aβ deposition (...)
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  46. added 2020-04-28
    PuF, an Antimetastatic and Developmental Signaling Protein, Interacts with the Alzheimer's Amyloid-Beta Precursor Protein Via a Tissue-Specific Proximal Regulatory Element.D. K. Lahiri, B. Maloney, J. T. Rogers & Y. W. Ge - 2013 - Bmc Genomics 14:68.
    BACKGROUND: Alzheimer's disease is intimately tied to amyloid-beta peptide. Extraneuronal brain plaques consisting primarily of Abeta aggregates are a hallmark of AD. Intraneuronal Abeta subunits are strongly implicated in disease progression. Protein sequence mutations of the Abeta precursor protein account for a small proportion of AD cases, suggesting that regulation of the associated gene may play a more important role in AD etiology. The APP promoter possesses a novel 30 nucleotide sequence, or "proximal regulatory element" , at -76/-47, from the (...)
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  47. added 2020-04-28
    Character of the Relationship with Alzheimer Patient and the Psychological Costs of Care.Katarzyna Popiołek & Ewa Wojtyna - 2012 - Polish Psychological Bulletin 43 (4):244-252.
    Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia. The aim of this study was to determine the dependence between the quality of the caregiver-patient relationship and the psychological costs the caregiver bears during the caregiving period. This study encompassed 292 caregivers. The study indicated the greatest level of depression and caregiving-related burdens in the spouses group, and the least in the friends/others group. The most important predictor of the level of burden in the caregiving role turned out to be (...)
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  48. added 2020-04-28
    Ethical Challenges When Patients Have Dementia.E. G. Howe - 2011 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 22 (3):203-211.
  49. added 2020-04-28
    May Alzheimer's Patients Refuse Tube Feeding? Yet More Questions on the Papal Allocution—And Perhaps an Answer: Articles.John Perry - 2011 - Christian Bioethics 17 (2):123-139.
    The implications of Pope John Paul II's 2004 Allocution on vegetative states remain unclear despite dozens of articles and a recent clarifying statement from the Vatican. Yet few have considered its implications for those with end-stage progressive dementia, such as Alzheimer's disease. Although recent studies suggest tube feeding is burdensome and not beneficial for such patients, the Allocution would nonetheless seem to forbid patients from forgoing it. But this seems to be in tension with the Catholic bioethical tradition as a (...)
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  50. added 2020-04-28
    In Quest of 'Good' Medical Classification Systems.Lara K. Kutschenko - 2011 - Medicine Studies 3 (1):53-70.
    Medical classification systems aim to provide a manageable taxonomy for sorting diagnoses into their proper classes. The question, this paper wants to critically examine, is how to correctly systematise diseases within classification systems that are applied in a variety of different settings. ICD and DSM , the two major classification systems in medicine and psychiatry, will be the main subjects of this paper; however, the arguments are not restricted to these classification systems but point out general methodological and epistemological challenges (...)
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