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  1. Syllogism, Demonstration, and Definition in Aristotle's Topics and Posterior Analytics.James Allen - 2011 - In Michael Frede, James V. Allen, Eyjólfur Kjalar Emilsson, Wolfgang-Rainer Mann & Benjamin Morison (eds.), Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy: Essays in Memory of Michael Frede. Summer 2011. Vol. 40. Oxford University Press. pp. 40--63.
  2. Greek Theories of Elementary Cognition: From Alcmaeon to Aristotle.John I. Beare - 1906 - Martino.
  3. Augustine's Debt to Stoicism in the Confessions.Sarah Catherine Byers - 2016 - In John Sellars (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of the Stoic Tradition. Routledge. pp. 56-69.
    Seneca asserts in Letter 121 that we mature by exercising self-care as we pass through successive psychosomatic “constitutions.” These are babyhood (infantia), childhood (pueritia), adolescence (adulescentia), and young adulthood (iuventus). The self-care described by Seneca is 'self-affiliation' (oikeiōsis, conciliatio) the linchpin of the Stoic ethical system, which defines living well as living in harmony with nature, posits that altruism develops from self-interest, and allows that pleasure and pain are indicators of well-being while denying that happiness consists in pleasure and that (...)
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  4. William Jordan, Ancient Concepts of Philosophy Reviewed By.Christopher Byrne - 1996 - Philosophy in Review 16 (3):176-178.
    Review of Ancient Concepts of Philosophy by William Jordan.
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  5. Epistemologia Greca Del Vi E V Secolo A.C.: Eraclito E Gli Eleati.Guido Calenda - 2011 - Aracne Editrice s.r.l..
    Heraclitus and Parmenides, far from being polar opposites, convey the same message: all is one, objects and entities are man made distinctions. Only God knows the whole truth, says Heraclitus, and the most learned man can only guess. For Parmenides the knowledge of being identifies with being itself, and things that mortals posit are only names given by men. Zeno apparent paradoxes give us an insight about the topics discussed in Parmenides entourage, but it was Melisso’s absurd version of Eleatism (...)
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  6. Recollection and "Posterior Analytics" II, 19.John Catan - 1970 - Apeiron 4 (2):34 - 57.
    Which are "innate" but "unnoticed" point–as is usually held–to the platonic doctrine of recollection or to some other source? my argument is two- pronged: negatively i argue that aristotle is not describing his hearers as impeded by plato's notion of recollection; the other, positive, that he is describing a misunderstanding of his own quite different doctrine of nous in the minds of his hearers. I show that the two elements of the aporia fit the teaching of aristotle on nous found (...)
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  7. The Origin of the Stoic Theory of Signs in Sextus Empiricus.Theodor Ebert - 1987 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 5:83-126.
    In this paper I argue that the Stoic theory of signs as reported by Sextus Empiricus in AM and in PH belongs to Stoic logicians which precede Chrysippus. I further argue that the PH-version of this theory presupposes the version in AM and is an attempt to improve the older theory. I tentatively attribute the PH-version to Cleanthes and the AM-version to Zeno. I finally argue that the origin of this Stoic theory is to be found in the Dialectical school (...)
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  8. Method in Ancient Greek Philosophy.J. Gentzler (ed.) - 1998 - Clarendon Press.
    Method in Ancient Philosophy brings together fifteen new, specially written essays by leading scholars on a broad subject of central importance. The ancient Greeks recognized that different forms of human activity are guided by different methods of reasoning; examination of how they reasoned, and how they thought about their own reasoning, helps us to see how they came to hold the views they did, and how our own methods of enquiry have developed under their influence. Contributors include Terence Irwin, Patricia (...)
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  9. Mimetic Ignorance, Platonic Doxa, and De Re Belief.David Glidden - 1985 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 2 (4):355 - 374.
  10. The Epistemology of the Cyrenaic School. [REVIEW]R. J. Hankinson - 2001 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 63 (3):720-723.
  11. Xenophanes on Inquiry and Discovery: An Altemative to the 'Hymn to Progress' Reading of Fr. 18.J. H. Lesher - 1991 - Ancient Philosophy 11 (2):229-248.
  12. Il lessico dell astrazione in Alessandro di Afrodisia.Chiara Militello - 2013 - Giornale Critico Della Filosofia Italiana 9 (2):302-321.
    This article is about the terms used in the works traditionally ascribed to Alexander of Aphrodisias to mean the process of abstraction through which intellect separates form and matter. The passages are studied in order to identify what nouns and verbs are used. Since in two works of dubious authorship aphaireô and aphairesis are found, the usage of these terms in the works that can be ascribed with certainty to Alexander is studied. The results obtained are examined in the light (...)
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  13. Phantasia in Classical Thought.Penelope Murray & G. Watson - 1992 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 112:189.
  14. Greek Mathematical Diagrams: Their Use and Their Meaning’.R. Netz - 1998 - For the Learning of Mathematics 18:33-39.
  15. Asking Students What Philosophers Teach.James Pearson - 2013 - Teaching Philosophy 36 (1):31-49.
    This essay argues for the value of teaching a unit that questions what it is that philosophers teach as a way of encouraging students to reflect on the nature of philosophy. I show how using ancient philosophy to frame this unit makes it especially urgent, since an important (and often overlooked) consequence of Socrates’s demarcation of philosophy from oratory is that philosophers are not in a position to teach anything. I have found that students are eager to engage the challenge (...)
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  16. Tlato on Perception and" Commons'", CQ 40: 148-75.. 1991.'Plato on Phantasia.'.A. Silverman - 1990 - Classical Antiquity 10:123-47.