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  1. 'The Relics of Absence’ in Grief and its Transcendence. Memory, Identity, Creativity (eds) A. Tutter and L. Wurmser.John Gale (ed.) - 2016 - New York & London: Routledge.
  2. Apollonius Dyscolus’ classification of adverbs of place in DE ADVERBIIS 201, 1-8.Noriega-Olmos Simon - 2016 - Glotta 92 (1):194-209.
    This paper argues that in De Adverbiis 201, 1-8 Apollonius is neither postulating, nor defending a sequential ranking of the three forms of adverbs of place to the effect that the notion referred by place-where is anterior to the notion referred by place-whence, and the notion referred by place-whence is anterior to the notion referred by place-whither. His point is that place-where is equally primitive in respect to both place-whence and place-whither because an analysis of place-whence and place-whither discloses place-where (...)
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  3. Philosophical role-playing in Cicero's letters to Paetus, 46 BC.Sean McConnell - 2022 - Antichthon 56:121–139.
    In his letters to Lucius Papirius Paetus from 46 BC Cicero provides striking reports on his thoughts and activities as he seeks to accommodate himself to the new political realities following Caesar’s decisive victory over the republican forces in Africa. In these letters Cicero also engages in a kind of performative role-playing: he casts himself variously as a teacher of oratory to two of Caesar’s close associates (Hirtius and Dolabella), as a bon vivant immersed in the Caesarian social scene, and (...)
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  4. Heraclitus, Change and Objective Contradictions in Aristotle’s Metaphysics Γ.Celso Vieira - 2023 - Rhizomata 10 (2):183-214.
    In Metaphysics Γ, Aristotle argues against those who seem to accept contradictions. He distinguishes between the Sophists, who deny the principle of non-contradiction through arguments, and the Natural Philosophers, whose physical investigations lead to the acceptance of objective contradictions. Heraclitus’ name appears throughout the discussion. Usually, he is associated with the discussion against the Sophists. In this paper, I explore how the discussion with the Natural Philosophers may illuminate both the interpretation of Heraclitus by Aristotle and Heraclitus’ own worldview. To (...)
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  5. Ipsum verum non videbis nisi in philosophiam totus intraveris. Studi in onore di Franco De Capitani. Raccolti da Fabrizio Amerini e Stefano Caroti.Fabrizio Amerini & Stefano Caroti (eds.) - 2016 - Parma: E-theca OnLineOpenAccess Edizioni.
  6. Review of S. Maso (2022) Cicero's Philosophy (de Gruyter)'. [REVIEW]Sean McConnell - 2022 - Bryn Mawr Classical Review.
  7. A Byzantine Metaphysics of Artefacts? The Case of Michael of Ephesus’ Commentary on Aristotle’s Metaphysics.Marilù Papandreou - 2022 - Philosophies 7 (4):88.
    The ontology of artefacts in Byzantine philosophy is still a terra incognita. One way of mapping this unexplored territory is to delve into Michael of Ephesus’ commentary on Aristotle’s Metaphysics. Written around 1100, this commentary provides a detailed interpretation of the most important source for Aristotle’s ontological account of artefacts. By highlighting Michael’s main metaphysical tenets and his interpretation of key-passages of the Aristotelian work, this study aims to reconstruct Michael’s ontology of artefacts and present it as one instance, which (...)
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  8. Are Katamenia a First Potentiality or First Actuality of a Human?Berman Chan - 2022 - Filosofia Unisinos 23 (2):1-10.
    In Aristotle’s writings regarding the biology of embryology, especially in the Generation of Animals, he contends that the mother’s menstrual fluids provide the material for the generation of the offspring, and the father’s form determines its formation as a member of that species (e.g. human). The katamenia (menstrual fluids) of the mother are said to be potentially all the body parts of the offspring, though actually none of them. So, the fluids are potentially the offspring. But are they a first (...)
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  9. Le divin, les dieux et le mouvement éternel dans l’univers d’Anaximandre.Luan Reboredo - 2021 - In Rossella Saetta Cottone (ed.), Penser les dieux avec les présocratiques. Paris: Rue D’Ulm. pp. 97-111.
    On propose ici de clarifier ce qu’Anaximandre entendait par « le divin » et ce qu’il appelait des « dieux ». À partir d’une réévaluation des sources anciennes, on soutient que cette enquête peut aider à comprendre son modèle cosmologique et le problème des cataclysmes dans son système. Trois hypothèses sont avancées à cette fin : [i] que dans Physique, III, 4, 203b3 15, le syntagme τὸ ἄπειρον renvoie à une notion concrète de substrat infini ; [ii] que dans ce (...)
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  10. A Natureza no Tribunal das Leis: hipóteses sobre as influências das leis escritas na cosmologia de Anaximandro.Luan Reboredo - 2019 - In Maria de Fátima Silva, Maria da Graça de Moraes Augusto & Maria do Céu Fialho (eds.), Casas, património, civilização: nomos versus physis no pensamento grego. Coimbra: Imprensa da Universidade de Coimbra. pp. 53-67.
    In this paper, we intend to explore the possible influences of legislative prose in the Anaximander’s cosmological prose construction, who would have been, according to Themistius, “the first Greek who dared to expose a written discourse about nature” (ἐθάρρησε πρῶτος ὧν ἴσμεν Ἑλλήνων λόγον ἐξενεγκεῖν περὶ φύσεως συγγεγραμμένον, Or. 26 p. 383 = DK12A7). Our aim is to clarify which notions of nature and justice are assumed in its emergent cosmology, considering that, at least from the lexical point of view, (...)
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  11. Análise do discurso: noções semânticas antigas e medievais.Remo Batista Sales - 2020 - Dissertation, Universidade Federal de Alagoas
  12. An Introduction to Pre-Socratic Ethics: Heraclitus and Democritus on Human Nature and Conduct (Part I: On Motion and Change).Erman Kaplama - 2021 - Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 17 (1):212-242.
    Both Heraclitus and Democritus, as the philosophers of historia peri phuseôs, consider nature and human character, habit, law and soul as interrelated emphasizing the links between phusis, kinesis, ethos, logos, kresis, nomos and daimon. On the one hand, Heraclitus’s principle of change (panta rhei) and his emphasis on the element of fire and cosmic motion ultimately dominate his ethics reinforcing his ideas of change, moderation, balance and justice, on the other, Democritus’s atomist description of phusis and motion underlies his principle (...)
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  13. Oriental Influences in the Greek Philosophy.Estiphan Panoussi - 1989 - Farhang 4:345-362.
  14. Uses and Misuses of the Common Concepts Strategy in Emperor Julian's Contra Galilaeos.Mate Veres - 2013 - In Mihail Mitrea (ed.), Tradition and Transformation: Dissent and Consent in the Mediterranean. Third CEMS International Graduate Conference (Budapest, May 30 - June 1, 2013). Solivagus Verlag. pp. 40-55.
    In this paper, I argue that Emperor Julian’s use of the theory of common concepts is evidence for a general strategy of Platonist anti-Christian discourse: the attempt at showing that Christianity, as opposed to pagan philosophy, fails to live up to the commonly available standards of truth. After the introduction (§ 1), the paper offers a short summary of the Stoic theory of common concepts and their Platonist appropriation (§ 2). Then it turns to Julian’s account of the naturally arising (...)
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  15. La veglia e il ruminare: nota testuale a Plin. HN praef. 18.Irene Leonardis - 2021 - Philologus: Zeitschrift für Antike Literatur Und Ihre Rezeption 165 (1):169-174.
  16. Wisdom, Love and Friendship in Ancient Philosophy.Evan Keeling & Georgia Sermamoglou (eds.) - 2020 - De Gruyter.
    This volume consists of fourteen essays in honor of Daniel Devereux on the themes of love, friendship, and wisdom in Plato, Aristotle, and the Epicureans. Philia (friendship) and eros (love) are topics of major philosophical interest in ancient Greek philosophy. They are also topics of growing interest and importance in contemporary philosophy, much of which is inspired by ancient discussions. Philosophy is itself, of course, a special sort of love, viz. the love of wisdom. Loving in the right way is (...)
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  17. Astrology: The Science of Signs in the Heavens.Glen Cooper - 2018 - In P. T. Keyser and J. Scarborough (ed.), The Oxford Handbook to Science and Medicine in the Classical World. Oxford, UK: pp. 381-407.
  18. Karl Kerényi: Der frühe Dionysos. (Eitrem-Forelesninger, 1960.) Pp. 59. Oslo: Universitetsforlaget, 1961. Paper.W. K. C. Guthrie - 1963 - The Classical Review 13 (3):353-353.
  19. L. G. Westerink: Anonymous Prolegomena to Platonic Philosophy. Pp. lii+69. Amsterdam: North-Holland Publishing Co., 1962. Cloth, fl. 15.75. [REVIEW]G. B. Kerferd - 1963 - The Classical Review 13 (3):347-347.
  20. Marcello Gigante: Diogene Laerzio, Vite dei Filosofi. Pp. xliv+662. Bari: Laterza, 1964. Cloth, L. 6,000.D. A. Russell - 1964 - The Classical Review 14 (2):216-216.
  21. Ben Edwin Perry: Secundus the Silent Philosopher. (American Philological Association, Philological Monographs, xxii.) Pp. xiv+306; 7 plates. Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 1964. Cloth. [REVIEW]J. N. Mattock - 1966 - The Classical Review 16 (1):128-128.
  22. Greek Science Branches Out - G. E. R. Lloyd: Greek Science after Aristotle. Pp. xiii+189; 33 figs. London: Chatto and Windus, 1973. Cloth, £2·25 (paper, £1·25). [REVIEW]E. D. Phillips - 1975 - The Classical Review 25 (2):305-307.
  23. Marcello Gigante: Diogene Laerzio. Vite dei filosofi. Seconda edizione riveduta e accresciuta. . 2 vols. Pp. lxxvi + 320, 321–638. Rome–Bari: Laterza, 1976. Paper, L. 2,900 per vol. [REVIEW]A. A. Long - 1980 - The Classical Review 30 (1):152-152.
  24. ThC. W. Oudemans, A. P. M. H. Lardinois: Tragic Ambiguity: Anthropology, Philosophy, and Sophocles' Antigone. Pp. 263. Leiden: Brill, 1987. fl. 125. [REVIEW]Simon D. Goldhill - 1988 - The Classical Review 38 (2):396-397.
  25. Mariano Baldassarri: Studi di Filosofia Antica, 1. Pp. 199. Como: Libreria Noseda, 1990. Paper.Jonathan Barnes - 1991 - The Classical Review 41 (2):501-501.
  26. Albert A. Bell Jr, Jr., James B. Allis: Resources in Ancient Philosophy: an Annotated Bibliography of Scholarship in English, 1965–1989. Pp. xvii + 799. Metuchen, N.J./London: The Scarecrow Press/Shelwing, 1991. £59.65. [REVIEW]Jonathan Barnes - 1993 - The Classical Review 43 (1):189-189.
  27. Richard J. Durling : Galenus Latinus II. Burgundio of Pisa's Translation of Galen's ΠΕΡΙ ΤΩΝ ΠΕΠΟΝΘΟΤΩΝ ΤΟΠΩΝ ‘De interioribus’. Vol. 1, Introduction and Text. Pp. 1–178. Vol. 2, Critical Notes and Indices. Pp. 185–450. Stuttgart: Franz Steiner, 1992. Paper, DM 178. [REVIEW]G. E. R. Lloyd - 1993 - The Classical Review 43 (2):423-423.
  28. S. Everson : Companions to Ancient Thought 3: Language. Pp. vii+280. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994. $64.95 , $19.95. [REVIEW]John Bussanich - 1996 - The Classical Review 46 (1):173-173.
  29. L. Brisson: Einführung in die Philosophie des Mythos. Vol. 1: Antike, Mittelalter und Renaissance (Translated by A. Russer) (Die Philosophie). Pp. x + 242. Darmstadt: Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft, 1996. Paper, DM 45/Sw. frs. 45/öS 351. ISBN: 3-534-10112-X. [REVIEW]Lowell Edmunds - 1998 - The Classical Review 48 (1):214-214.
  30. J. J. Cleary, W. Wians : Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy XII. Pp. xxviii + 331. Lanham, New York, and Oxford: University Press of America, 1996. Paper, $29.50 . ISBN: 0-7618-1000-5. [REVIEW]John Dillon - 2000 - The Classical Review 50 (2):629-630.
  31. T. D. Barnes : The Sciences in Greco-Roman Society. Pp. vi + 125. Edmonton: Academic Printing and Publishing, 1995. Cased, $54.95 . ISBN: 0-920980-60-0. [REVIEW]A. S. Gratwick - 2000 - The Classical Review 50 (2):633-634.
  32. G. de Callataÿ: Annus Platonicus. A Study of World Cycles in Greek, Latin and Arabic Sources. (Publications de l’Institut Orientaliste de Louvain 47.) Pp. xv + 287. Louvain-la-Neuve: Université catholique de Louvain, 1996. ISBN: 90-6831-876-4. [REVIEW]Luc Deitz - 2000 - The Classical Review 50 (2):628-629.
  33. L. Brisson: Introduction à la philosophie du mythe, I: Sauver les mythes . Pp. 243. Paris: Librairie Philosophique J. Vrin, 1996. Paper, frs. 125. ISBN: 2-7116-127-6. [REVIEW]Ken Dowden - 2000 - The Classical Review 50 (2):614-615.
  34. A. Billault: L’Univers de Philostrate. (Collection Latomus 252.) Pp. 144. Brussels: Latomus Revue d’Études Latines, 2000. Paper. ISBN: 2-87031-193-1. [REVIEW]Jaś Elsner - 2001 - The Classical Review 51 (2):392-393.
  35. M. E. Stone, M. E. Shirinian: Pseudo-Zeno: Anonymous Philosophical Treatise. Pp. xiv + 254. Leiden, Boston, and Cologne: Brill, 2000. Cased, $85. ISBN: 90-04-11524-2. [REVIEW]R. W. Sharples - 2001 - The Classical Review 51 (2):393-393.
  36. R. Burger : Encounters & Reflections. Conversations with Seth Benardete. With Robert Berman, Ronna Burger, and Michael Davis. Pp. x $ 229, ills. Chicago and London: The University of Chicago Press, 2002. Cased, US$30/£21.50. ISBN: 0-226-04278-2. [REVIEW]William M. Calder - 2004 - The Classical Review 54 (1):253-253.
  37. A. Thivel, A. Zucker : Le normal et la pathologique dans la Collection hippocratique. Actes du Xème colloque international hippocratique . Pp. 855, in 2 vols. Nice: Publications de la Faculté des Lettres, Arts et Sciences Humaines de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, 2002. Paper, €22.50 per vol. ISBN: 2-914561-10-5. [REVIEW]Rebecca Flemming - 2004 - The Classical Review 54 (2):565-566.
  38. Greek Technical Writings - Asper Griechische Wissenschaftstexte. Formen, Funktionen, Differenzierungsgeschichten. Pp. 453. Stuttgart: Franz Steiner Verlag, 2007. Cased, €66. ISBN: 978-3-515-08959-3. [REVIEW]Philip van der Eijk - 2010 - The Classical Review 60 (1):69-71.
  39. CPF - Corpus dei papiri filosofici greci e latini . Testi e lessico nei papiri di cultura greca e latina. Parte IV.2. Tavole . Pp. xxxiv + pls. Florence: Leo S. Olschki for Accademia Toscana di Scienze e Lettere “La Colombaria”, 2008. Cased, €210. ISBN: 978-88-222-5785-7 - Corpus dei papiri filosofici greci e latini . Testi e lessico nei papiri di cultura greca e latina. Parte I.2: Cultura e filosofia . In two volumes. Pp. lxxxii + 1005. Florence: Leo S. Olschki for Accademia Toscana di Scienze e Lettere “La Colombaria”, 2008. Paper, €175. ISBN: 978-88-222-5791-8. [REVIEW]Mike Edwards - 2010 - The Classical Review 60 (1):37-39.
    Corpus dei papiri filosofici greci e latini . Testi e lessico nei papiri di cultura greca e latina. Parte IV.2. Tavole . Pp. xxxiv + pls. Florence: Leo S. Olschki for Accademia Toscana di Scienze e Lettere “La Colombaria”, 2008. Cased, €210. ISBN: 978-88-222-5785-7Corpus dei papiri filosofici greci e latini . Testi e lessico nei papiri di cultura greca e latina. Parte I.2: Cultura e filosofia . In two volumes. Pp. lxxxii + 1005. Florence: Leo S. Olschki for Accademia Toscana (...)
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  40. Heracles the philosopher.Christopher Moore - 2017 - Classical Quarterly 67 (1):27-48.
    Among our earliest extant references to the word ‘philosophize’ is an unfamiliar one, from the mythographer Herodorus of Pontic Heraclea, whose son Bryson associated with Plato and Aristotle. A Byzantine compiler quotes Herodorus, probably from his book on Heracles, as saying that his hero ‘philosophized until death’. This is a surprising claim in light of the fifth/fourth-centuryb.c.view of Heracles as long-toiling but not intellectual. Euripides'Licymniuscharacterizes him as ‘unimpressive and unadorned, good to the greatest degree, confined from allsophiain action, unversed in (...)
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  41. Teleological Perspectives in Aristotle’s Biology.Jessica Gelber - 2021 - In The Cambridge Companion to Aristotle's Biology. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. pp. 97-113.
  42. Christina Kreuzwieser, Der Begriff ‚natura‘ und seine ethische Relevanz in Senecas Prosaschriften. [REVIEW]Stefan Röttig - 2018 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 21 (1):228-231.
  43. ‘Why is Latin spectrum a bad translation of Epicurus’ ΕΙΔΩΛΟΝ? Cicero and Cassius on a point of philosophical translation’.Sean McConnell - 2019 - Mnemosyne 72 (1):154-162.
    This paper examines two letters between Cicero and Gaius Cassius Longinus in which they critically discuss and denigrate the translation of Epicurus’ term εἴδωλον as spectrum by an Epicurean named Catius. It first offers a new positive account for why Catius made his choice of translation, and it then outlines the full reasons for why Cicero and Cassius found the translation unsatisfying.
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  44. The Beginnings and Nature of Science in Archaic Greece [Počiatky a povaha vedy v archaickom Grécku].Pavol Labuda - 2017 - Cultural History 8 (2):176-199.
    The Beginnings and Nature of Science in Archaic Greece: The aim of the paper is to examine the beginnings and nature of science in the archaic period of ancient Greece. The method of research is historicalphilosophical. It is historical because the interpretation of the birth of science suggested by our approach corresponds with text evidence. And it is philosophical because our reconstruction of the birth of science is able to explain the dynamic nature of the stratification of science. In the (...)
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  45. La visione politica in Plotino.Franco De Capitani - 2016 - Noctua 3 (1):1-28.
    Contrary to the common opinion of the scarce important of politics in Plotinus’ thought, in this paper the relevance of this notion is stressed. Even though Plotinus’ main interest is evidently toward interiority and rational spirituality, men’s actual condition, born and living in a social context, forces him to acknowledge the importance of man’s social and political life. The discussion on virtues in Enneads I, 2 is essential in establishing the real weight of politics in Plotinus’ philosophy.
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  46. Neoplatonic Demons and Angels.Luc Brisson, Seamus Joseph O'Neill & Andrei Timotin - 2018 - Leiden, Netherlands: Brill.
    Neoplatonic Demons and Angels is a collection of studies which examine the place reserved for angels and demons not only by the main Neoplatonic philosophers, but also in Gnosticism, the Chaldaean Oracles and Christian Neoplatonism.
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  47. Luc Brisson, Marie-Hélène Congourdeau, Jean-Luc Solère , L’embryon. Formation et animation. Antiquité grecque et latine, traditions hebraique, chrétienne et islamique, Paris: Librairie Philosophique J. Vrin, 2008, pp. 290. ISBN: 978-2-7116-1957-3. Price €32. [REVIEW]Philip van der Eijk - 2010 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 4 (1):79-81.
  48. Book ReviewsRichard Sorabji,. Emotion and Peace of Mind: From Stoic Agitation to Christian Temptation.Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000. Pp. 499. $45.00. [REVIEW]Brad Inwood - 2002 - Ethics 112 (4):863-866.
  49. Review of: Nietzsche as a Scholar of Antiquity ed. by Anthony K. Jensen and Helmut Heit, and: Plato and Nietzsche: Their Philosophical Art by Mark Anderson. [REVIEW]Christopher Janaway - 2018 - Journal of Nietzsche Studies 49 (1):136-142.
    The editors of Nietzsche as a Scholar of Antiquity claim with some justification that few philosophers, and even fewer classicists, have "taken the time to understand [Nietzsche] on his own terms as a scholar of antiquity". "Our primary aim," Jensen and Heit say, "is to show not how Nietzsche's earlier works on antiquity help us to understand Nietzsche, but how they may improve our understanding of antiquity." The contributions vary quite widely in style and quality, and I shall suggest that (...)
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  50. Episteme, etc.: Essays in honour of Jonathan Barnes.Ben Morison & Katerina Ierodiakonou (eds.) - 2011 - Oxford, GB: Oxford University Press.
    The sixteen essays written in honour of Jonathan Barnes for this volume reflect the impressive scope of his contributions to philosophy. Six are on knowledge, five on logic and metaphysics, five on ethics. The volume ranges widely over ancient philosophy, while also finding room for two contemporary papers on truth and vagueness. Aristotle is prominent in eight of the essays; Plato, Sextus Empiricus, the Stoics, the Epicureans, and ancient Greek medical writers are also discussed. The contributors include some of the (...)
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