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  1. ‘Law and Literature’ in Tacitus - Petersen Recht Bei Tacitus. Pp. XX + 617. Berlin and Boston: De Gruyter, 2019. Cased, £72.50, €79.95, Us$91.99. Isbn: 978-3-11-057988-8. [REVIEW]Kimberley Czajkowski - forthcoming - The Classical Review:1-2.
  2. Book Review: The Return of the Romans: Roman Political Thought and Political Philosophy and the Republican Future: Reconsidering Cicero, by Jed W. Atkins and Gregory Bruce Smith. [REVIEW]Dean Hammer - forthcoming - Political Theory:009059171987662.
  3. The Sixth Century - (M.) Kruse the Politics of Roman Memory. From the Fall of the Western Empire to the Age of Justinian. Pp. X + 292. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2019. Cased, £52, Us$65. Isbn: 978-0-8122-5162-3. [REVIEW]F. K. Haarer - 2021 - The Classical Review 71 (1):179-181.
  4. Pandering for the Greater Good? Senate, People, and Politics in Cicero’s de Lege Agraria 1 and 2.Brian Krostenko - 2021 - Polis 38 (1):108-126.
    Cicero’s first speeches as consul, de lege agraria I and II, delivered to the senate and the people respectively, are virtually identical in outline and broad argument. That allows the rhetorical technique of individual sections to be compared closely. This article uses such comparisons to probe the tactics and ideology of the speeches. In both Cicero’s choice of word and phrase might suggest that he is simply addressing his audiences as suits their stations. But a consideration of the circumstances of (...)
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  5. Tertullian on ‘The Freedom of Religion’.Jed W. Atkins - 2020 - Polis 37 (1):145-175.
    Tertullian first coined the phrase ‘the freedom of religion’. This article considers what this entails. I argue that Tertullian’s discussion of religious liberty derives its theoretical significance from his creative repurposing of the Roman idea of liberty as non-domination. Tertullian contends that the Roman magistrates’ treatment of Christian citizens and loyal subjects amounts to tyrannical domination characterized by the absence of the traditional conditions for non-domination: the rule of law, rule in and responsive to the interests of the people, and (...)
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  6. A Revised Translation of Cicero's de Re Publica and de Legibus - (J.E.G.) Zetzel (Trans.) Cicero: On the Commonwealth and on the Laws. Second Edition. Pp. Lx + 212. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2017 (First Edition 1999). Paper, £17.99 (Cased, Us$54.99). Isbn: 978-1-316-50556-4 (978-1-107-14006-6 Hbk). [REVIEW]Thomas J. B. Cole - 2020 - The Classical Review 70 (2):377-378.
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  7. Politics and Philosophy at Rome: Collected Papers, Edited by Miriam T. Griffin and Catalina Balmaceda.Alex Dressler - 2020 - Polis 37 (1):181-184.
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  8. The Return of the Romans.Dean Hammer - 2020 - Political Theory 48 (3):390-400.
  9. The Roman Republic and the Crisis of American Democracy: Echoes of the Past.Dean Hammer - 2020 - Polis 37 (1):95-122.
    My starting point is a fundamental paradox that lies at the heart of the slow demise of the Roman Republic: why does the system collapse when, as many scholars have noted, there is nothing that suggests that there was ever an intention by anyone to overthrow the Republic? Understanding this paradox is key to identifying what Rome might have to say to us today. What changes in the final decades of the Roman Republic is a declining view of the ability (...)
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  10. ‘The Protectorate of the World’: The Problem of Just Hegemony in Roman Thought.Michael Hawley - 2020 - Polis 37 (1):44-71.
    Contemporary normative theory is understandably reluctant to consider how a hegemonic power ought to conduct itself. After all, a truly just international order, characterised by principles of freedom and equality among nations, would not include one polity so able to dominate others. The natural impulse of normative theorists then is to seek to eliminate such an imbalance. Yet, a sober assessment of political reality provides little prospect for such aspirations. The more modest alternative is to examine how hegemonic power might (...)
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  11. 'Anonymus Iamblichi, On Excellence (Peri Aretês): A Lost Defense of Democracy'.Phillip Sidney Horky - 2020 - In D. Wolfsdorf (ed.), Early Greek Ethics. Oxford, UK: pp. 262-92.
    In 1889, the German philologist Friedrich Blass isolated a section of Chapter 20 from Iamblichus’ Exhortation to Philosophy (mid- or late 3rd Century CE) as an extract from a lost sophistic or philosophical treatise from the late 5th Century BCE. In this article, I introduce the text, which is now known as 'Anonymus Iamblichi' (or 'the anonymous work preserved in Iamblichus') by appeal to its two main contexts (source preservation and original historical composition), translate and discuss all eight surviving fragments (...)
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  12. The City as a Living Organism: Aristotle’s Naturalness Thesis Reconsidered.Xinkai Hu - 2020 - History of Political Thought 41 (4):517-537.
    In this paper, I wish to defend Aristotle’s naturalness thesis. First, I argue against the claim that the city fails to meet the criteria (e.g. separability, continuity, etc.) Aristotle sets for substantiality in the Metaphysics. Second, I examine the problem of the Principle of Transitivity of End in Aristotle’s telic argument for the naturalness of the city. I argue that the city exists for its own end. Finally, I discuss the problem of the legislator in the genesis of the city. (...)
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  13. The Athenian Constitution - (F.) Carugati Creating a Constitution. Law, Democracy, and Growth in Ancient Athens. Pp. XIV + 239, Figs, Map. Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2019. Cased, £30, Us$39.95. Isbn: 978-0-691-19563-6. [REVIEW]Nicholas F. Jones - 2020 - The Classical Review 70 (2):419-421.
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  14. Letter From the Editor-in-Chief of Polis.Thornton Lockwood - 2020 - Polis 37 (1):1-2.
    It gives me great pleasure and honor to introduce myself as the incoming Editor-in-Chief of Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek and Roman Political Thought. For the last decade I have served as an Associate Editor and the Book Review Editor of the journal. I am very excited about charting new paths for the journal, while continuing to publish first-rate scholarship in our area strengths. Although ‘polis’ is a Greek word that identifies a specific Greek historical political institution, in many (...)
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  15. Introduction to Polis Special Issue on Roman Political Thought.Grant Nelsestuen & Daniel Kapust - 2020 - Polis 37 (1):3-6.
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  16. Leaving the State of Nature: Polybius on Resentment and the Emergence of Morals and Political Order.Benjamin Straumann - 2020 - Polis 37 (1):9-43.
    The possibility of cooperation and the stability of political order are long-standing problems. Polybius, well known for his Histories analysing the expansion of Rome and his description of the Roman constitution, also offers an intriguing social and political theory that covers ground from psycho-anthropological micro-foundations to institution-based political order, providing a genealogy of morals and political order that is best understood in game-theoretical terms. In this paper I try to give such an interpretation. Polybius’ naturalistic, proto-game theoretical views show similarities (...)
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  17. The Socratic Way of Life: Xenophon’s Memorabilia, Written by Thomas L. Pangle.Harold Tarrant - 2020 - Polis 37 (2):378-381.
  18. The Politics of Socratic Humor, Written by John Lombardini.John Zumbrunnen - 2020 - Polis 37 (2):356-358.
  19. Models of Inclusion and Exclusion in Democracy Ancient and Modern: A Response to Paul Cartledge’s Democracy: A Life.Carol Atack - 2019 - Philosophy and Public Issues - Filosofia E Questioni Pubbliche 9 (2):13-31.
  20. The Discourse of Kingship in Classical Greece.Carol Atack - 2019 - Abingdon: Routledge.
    This book examines how ancient authors explored ideas of kingship as a political role fundamental to the construction of civic unity, the use of kingship stories to explain the past and present unity of the polis and the distinctive function or status attributed to kings in such accounts. -/- It explores the notion of kingship offered by historians such as Herodotus, as well as dramatists writing for the Athenian stage, paying particular attention to dramatic depictions of the unique capabilities of (...)
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  21. Free to Think? Epistemic Authority and Thinking for Oneself.Ursula Coope - 2019 - British Academy 7.
    People generally agree that there is something valuable about thinking for oneself rather than simply accepting beliefs on authority, but it is not at all obvious why this is valuable. This paper discusses two ancient responses, both inspired by the example of Socrates. Cicero claims that thinking for yourself gives you freedom. Olympiodorus argues that thinking for yourself makes it possible to achieve understanding, and that understanding is valuable because it gives you a certain kind of independence. The paper asks (...)
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  22. Politics and Philosophy at Rome: Collected Papers by Miriam T. Griffin.James Ker - 2019 - Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 113 (1):118-119.
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  23. Remparts et Philosophie aux Ve et IVe siècles.David Lévystone - 2019 - Mnemosyne 72:736-765.
    The main disciples of Socrates criticise the use of city walls. However, their attacks are less grounded in a deep strategic reflexion than related to the traumatic consequences of Pericles’ strategy at the beginning of the Peloponnesian war. The Lacedemonians’ opposition to the erection of surrounding walls is more likely linked to their aristo- cratic ideology and interests than to moral imperatives. Though Plato and Xenophon’s motives are to avoid political divisions in the city, their positions on fortifications reveal their (...)
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  24. The Revival of Platonism in Cicero’s Late Philosophy: Platonis Aemulus and the Invention of Cicero, Written by William H. F. Altman.Robert Dudley - 2018 - Polis 35 (2):582-586.
  25. Crisis and Constitutionalism: Roman Political Thought From the Fall of the Republic to the Age of Revolution, Written by Benjamin Straumann.Dean Hammer - 2018 - Polis 35 (1):282-284.
  26. Lucretius on the Nature of Parental Love.Sean McConnell - 2018 - Antichthon 52:72-89.
  27. ‘Review of C. Arruzza and D. Nikulin (Eds.) (2016) Philosophy and Political Power in Antiquity (Brill)’. [REVIEW]Sean McConnell - 2018 - Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek Political Thought 35:312-315.
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  28. Roman Patriotism and Christian Religion.Alex V. Halapsis - 2017 - Socio-Political Processes 6 (2-3):251-267.
    Ideology is an important part of the political mechanism that helps to ensure the loyalty of citizens to the state and give it a moral basis and justification. Roman patriotism was deeply religious. The community was the subject of faith, but also faith was a state duty, a testimony of trustworthiness. Personal religiosity was res privata, but loyalty to the state cult was res publica. Roman ideology was based on respect for ancestors, respect for the institution of the family and (...)
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  29. Livy’s Political Philosophy: Power and Personality in Early Rome, Written by Ann Vasaly.Daniel Kapust - 2017 - Polis 34 (1):160-163.
  30. Aristóteles y el pensamiento político aristocrático.Manuel Knoll - 2017 - Revista de Filosofía 73:87-106.
    Según una influyente línea interpretativa, la mejor polis de Aristóteles debe ser considerada una politeia. Esta corriente predomina aún hoy entre los eruditos alemanes. En tanto paladina de la “social democracia aristotélica”, Martha Nussbaum pertenece también a esta línea exegética. En oposición a tales interpretaciones, este ensayo defiende la tesis de que Aristóteles pertenece a la tradición de pensamiento político aristocrático. Esta tradición se remonta a Teognis, Heráclito y Platón y se inicia como una crítica dirigida tanto a la decadencia (...)
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  31. Aristóteles y el pensamiento político aristocrático.Manuel Knoll - 2017 - Revista de filosofía (Chile) 73:87-106.
    Una Según una influyente línea interpretativa sostiene que la mejor ciudad polis ideal de Aristóteles debe ser considerada como un gobierno constitucionaluna politeia (πολιτεία). Son eruditos alemanes quienes adoptan esta lecturaEsta corriente predomina aún hoy entre los eruditos alemanes.. En este grupo hay que incluir a Martha Nussbaum en tanto que aboga por una “socialdemocracia aristotélicaEn tanto paladina de la “social democracia aristotélica”, Martha Nussbaum pertenece también a esta línea exegética ”. En oposición a tales interpretaciones, este ensayo defiende la (...)
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  32. Eusebius of Caesarea’s Un-Platonic Platonic Political Theology.V. Bradley Lewis - 2017 - Polis 34 (1):94-114.
  33. The Political Theorizing of Aeschylus's Persians.Thornton Lockwood - 2017 - Interpretation 43 (3):383-402.
    Aeschylus’ Persians dramatically represents the Athenian victory at Salamis from the perspective of the Persian royal court at Susa. Although the play is in some sense a patriotic celebration of the Athenian victory and its democracy, nonetheless in both form and function it is a tragedy that generates sympathy for the suffering of its main character, Xerxes. Although scholars have argued whether the play is primarily patriotic or tragic, I argue that the play purposively provides both patriotic and tragic elements (...)
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  34. ‘Review of M. Bonazzi and S. Schorn (Eds.) (2016) Bios Philosophos: Philosophy in Ancient Greek Biography (Brepols)’. [REVIEW]Sean McConnell - 2017 - Classical Journal 2017:09.05.
  35. The Epicureans on Human Nature and its Social and Political Consequences.Jan Maximilian Robitzsch - 2017 - Polis 34 (1):1-19.
  36. Thrasymachus’ Sophistic Account of Justice in Republic I.Merrick E. Anderson - 2016 - Ancient Philosophy 36 (1):151-172.
    In this paper, I oppose the now-dominant view that Thrasymachus offers a definition of justice in Book I of the Republic. This way of interpretation Thrasymachus does not pay sufficient attention to the methodological assumptions he makes during his disagreement with Socrates. To better understand Socrates’ antagonist, it is crucial to remember that he was, in fact, a sophist. I argue that what the character Thrasymachus is doing in Book I is importantly akin to a certain genre of sophistic arguments (...)
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  37. A Survey of Roman Political Thought. D. Hammer Roman Political Thought. From Cicero to Augustine. Pp. XVIII + 555. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014. Cased, £55, Us$90. Isbn: 978-0-521-19524-9. [REVIEW]Carol Atack - 2016 - The Classical Review 66 (1):121-123.
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  38. Legislating Immortality in Plato’s Republic.Emily Austin - 2016 - Ancient Philosophy 36 (1):133-150.
  39. Birth of Politics: Eight Greek and Roman Political Ideas and Why They Matter, Written by Melissa Lane.Dean Hammer - 2016 - Polis 33 (1):179-182.
  40. Empedocles Democraticus: Hellenistic Biography at the Intersection of Philosophy and Politics.Phillip Sidney Horky - 2016 - In Mauro Bonazzi & Stefan Schorn (eds.), Bios Philosophos: Philosophy in Ancient Greek Biography. 2300 Turnhout, Belgium: pp. 37-71.
    Diogenes Laertius (8.63-6) preserves a fascinating account of the Presocratic philosopher Empedocles' life. There, drawing on evidence from Aristotle, Xanthus, and Timaeus of Tauromenium, the biographer provides several anecdotes which are meant to demonstrate how Empedocles had, contrary to expectation, been a democratic philosopher - a paradox of itself in Ancient Greece. This article unpacks the complex web woven by Diogenes and argues that there is no good reason to assume that Empedocles was indeed a democratic philosopher, and moreover, that (...)
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  41. Types of Freedom and Submission in Tacitus' Agricola.Jula Wildberger - 2016 - In Aldo Setaioli (ed.), Apis Matina: Studi in onore di Carlo Santini. Trieste: EUT Edizioni Università di Trieste. pp. 715-726.
    Discusses conceptions of freedom displayed in Tacitus' Agricola. Tacitus seems to have had a clear-cut conceptual grid in which the German defectors, the Usipi, mirror the futile demonstrations of freedom by senators seeking a "ambitious death." The British provincials, including Calgacus and his followers, correspond to the ordinary Roman people and their leadership. It is in the army that a form of non-debasing hierarchy for the common benefit can be conceived, as long as the army and their leader is in (...)
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  42. Roman Political Thought: From Cicero to Augustine, Written by Dean Hammer.Jonathan Zarecki - 2016 - Polis 33 (1):183-185.
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  43. Cicero on Politics and the Limits of Reason: The Republic and Laws (Cambridge Classical Studies) by Jed W. Atkins.William H. F. Altman - 2015 - Ancient Philosophy 35 (1):241-243.
  44. Cicero's Political Philosophy. J.W. Atkins Cicero on Politics and the Limits of Reason. The Republic and Laws. Pp. XIV + 270. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013. Cased, £60, Us$95. Isbn: 978-1-107-04358-9. [REVIEW]Cynthia J. Bannon - 2015 - The Classical Review 65 (1):120-122.
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  45. A Phenomenology of Democracy.Paul J. Kosmin - 2015 - Classical Antiquity 34 (1):121-162.
    This article has two objectives. First, and in particular, it seeks to reinterpret the ostracism procedure of early democratic Athens. Since Aristotle, this has been understood as a rational, political weapon of collective defense, intended to expel from Athens a disproportionately powerful individual. In this article, by putting emphasis on themateriality, gestures, and location of ostraka-casting, I propose instead that the institution can more fruitfully be understood as a ritual enactment of civic unity. Second, and more generally, I hope to (...)
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  46. Book Review: Politeia in Greek and Roman Philosophy, Written by Verity Harte and Melissa Lane. [REVIEW]John Lombardini - 2015 - Polis 32 (1):248-251.
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  47. Kritik Über Zarecki (2014): Cicero’s Ideal Statesman in Theory and Practice.Simon Puschmann - 2015 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 18 (1):244-252.
  48. Senecan Progressor Friendship and the Characterization of Nero in Tacitus' Annals.Jula Wildberger - 2015 - In Christoph Kugelmeier (ed.), Translatio humanitatis: Festschrift zum 60. Geburtstag von Peter Riemer. Sankt Ingbert: Röhrig Universitätsverlag. pp. 471-492.
    Argues that Tacitus’ shaped his account of Seneca and the characterization of Nero within his social environment according to features characteristic of Seneca’s conception of friendship. Surprisingly, Tacitus assigns to Nero an active power: The emperor drives a ubiquitous inversion of the social values promoted by his mentor. Patterns of Seneca’s social thought are adduced to characterize not only the portrayed emperor but also the political institution itself.
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  49. Plato, Aristotle, and the Purpose of Politics, by Kevin M. Cherry.Cinzia Arruzza - 2014 - Ancient Philosophy 34 (2):432-436.
  50. The Idiōtēs and the Tyrant.Matthew Landauer - 2014 - Political Theory 42 (2):139-166.
    Athenian democracy is rightly recognized for its extensive network of accountability institutions. This essay focuses instead on popular unaccountability in democratic Athens: ordinary citizens participating but not speaking in the Courts and the Assembly were unaccountable. I explore possible justifications of popular unaccountability, including arguments from democratic sovereignty and epistemic arguments, and stress the importance of a third strand: the identification of jurors and assemblymen with deservedly unaccountable, because comparatively weak and powerless, idiōtai , whose political activity failed to reach (...)
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