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1 — 50 / 128
  1. added 2020-05-21
    The Standing To Blame, or Why Moral Disapproval Is What It Is.Stefan Riedener - 2019 - Dialectica 73 (1-2):183-210.
    Intuitively, we lack the standing to blame others in light of moral norms that we ourselves don't take seriously: if Adam is unrepentantly aggressive, say, he lacks the standing to blame Celia for her aggressiveness. But why does blame have this feature? Existing proposals try to explain this by reference to specific principles of normative ethics – e.g. to rule‐consequentialist considerations, to the wrongness of hypocritical blame, or principles of rights‐forfeiture based on this wrongness. In this paper, I suggest a (...)
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  2. added 2020-05-13
    Anger and Forgiveness: Resentment, Generosity, and Justice.Dan Degerman - 2018 - Contemporary Political Theory 17 (S1):9-12.
  3. added 2020-03-11
    Forgiveness and the Multiple Functions of Anger.Antony G. Aumann & Zac Cogley - 2020 - Journal of Philosophy of Emotion 1 (1):44-71.
    This paper defends an account of forgiveness that is sensitive to recent work on anger. Like others, we claim anger involves an appraisal, namely that someone has done something wrong. But, we add, anger has two further functions. First, anger communicates to the wrongdoer that her act has been appraised as wrong and demands she feel guilty. This function enables us to explain why apologies make it reasonable to forgo anger and forgive. Second, anger sanctions the wrongdoer for what she (...)
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  4. added 2019-08-02
    Indignation, Appreciation, and the Unity of Moral Experience.Uriah Kriegel - forthcoming - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice.
    Moral experience comes in many flavors. Some philosophers have argued that there is nothing common to the many forms moral experience can take. In this paper, I argue that close attention to the phenomenology of certain key emotions, combined with a clear distinction between essentially and accidentally moral experiences, suggests that there is a group of (essentially) moral emotions which in fact exhibit significant unity.
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  5. added 2019-07-07
    Anger and Indignation.John J. Drummond - 2017 - In John J. Drummond & Sonja Rinofner-Kreidl (eds.), Emotional Experiences: Ethical and Social Significance. London and New York: Rowman & Littlefield.
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  6. added 2019-06-07
    Anger and Indifference in Juvenal. [REVIEW]S. H. Braund - 1982 - The Classical Review 32 (2):169-170.
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  7. added 2019-06-06
    Medical Analogies in Buddhist and Hellenistic Thought: Tranquillity and Anger: Christopher W. Gowans.Christopher W. Gowans - 2010 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 66:11-33.
    Medical analogies are commonly invoked in both Indian Buddhist dharma and Hellenistic philosophy. In the Pāli Canon, nirvana is depicted as a form of health, and the Buddha is portrayed as a doctor who helps us attain it. Much later in the tradition, Śāntideva described the Buddha’s teaching as ‘the sole medicine for the ailments of the world, the mine of all success and happiness.’ Cicero expressed the view of many Hellenistic philosophers when he said that philosophy is ‘a medical (...)
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  8. added 2019-06-06
    The Moral Status of Anger: Thomas Aquinas and John Cassian.Michael Rota - 2007 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 81 (3):395-418.
    Is anger at another person ever a morally excellent thing? Two competing answers to this question can be found in the Christian intellectual tradition. JohnCassian held that anger at another person is never morally virtuous. Aquinas, taking an Aristotelian line, maintained that anger at another person is sometimes morally virtuous. In this paper I explore the positions of Cassian and Aquinas on this issue. The core of my paper consists in a close examination of two arguments given by Aquinas in (...)
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  9. added 2019-06-06
    Can We Teach Justified Anger?Kristjan Kristjansson - 2005 - Philosophy of Education 39 (4):671-689.
    The question of whether there is such a thing as teachable justified anger encompasses three distinct questions: the psychological question of whether the emotions in general, and anger in particular, are regulatable; the moral question of whether anger can ever be morally justified; and the educational question of whether we have any sound methods at our disposal for teaching justified anger. In this paper I weave Aristotelian responses to those questions together with insights from the current psychology literature on emotion (...)
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  10. added 2019-06-06
    Anger and Christian Love: The Historical Search for Their Normative Relationship.Fred Guyette - 2005 - Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 15 (1):66-82.
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  11. added 2019-06-06
    Restraining Rage: The Ideology of Anger Control in Classical Antiquity, by William V. Harris. [REVIEW]Robert J. Rabel - 2004 - Ancient Philosophy 24 (1):238-244.
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  12. added 2019-06-06
    Anger and Human Transcendance: A Response to “A Rahnerian Reading of Black Rage”.Bryan N. Massingale - 2003 - Philosophy and Theology 15 (1):217-228.
    In the aftermath of the racial disturbances that rocked the United States during the summer of 1967, the official government commission formed to investigate its causes noted: “…certain fundamental matters are clear. Of these, the most fundamental is the racial attitude and behavior of white Americans toward black Americans. Race prejudice has shaped our history decisively; it now threatens to affect our future”. Given the indisputable influence of racism and the ideology of white supremacy upon our national character, Carmichael Peters (...)
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  13. added 2019-06-06
    Aquinas and the Role of Anger in Social Reform.Judith Barad - 2000 - Logos: A Journal of Catholic Thought and Culture 3 (1):124-144.
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  14. added 2019-06-05
    The Moral Psychology of Anger.Myisha Cherry & Owen Flanagan (eds.) - 2017 - London: Rowman & Littlefield.
    The Moral Psychology of Anger is the first comprehensive study of the moral psychology of anger from a philosophical perspective. The collection provides an inclusive view of anger from a variety of philosophical perspectives.
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  15. added 2019-06-01
    A Note On Anger (in Spanish translation).Marilyn Frye - manuscript
    "A Note On Anger," in The Politics of Reality: Essays in Feminist Theory (Trumansburg, NY: The Crossing Press, 1983), has been translated into Spanish by Maria Lugones for circulation in la Asociacion Argentina de Mujeres en Filosofia. See the links below for the original book.
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  16. added 2019-05-28
    Divine Forgiveness and Mercy in Evolutionary Perspective.Isaac Wiegman - 2017 - In Matthew Nelson Hill & Wm Curtis Holtzen (eds.), Connecting Faith and Science. Claremont: Claremont Press. pp. 189-220.
  17. added 2019-05-28
    Divine Retribution in Evolutionary Perspective.Isaac Wiegman - 2016 - In Wm Curtis Holtzen & Matthew Nelson Hill (eds.), In Spirit and Truth. Claremont: CST Press. pp. 181-202.
  18. added 2019-05-22
    Mercy and Forgiveness.Alice MacLachlan - 2012 - In Ruth Chadwick (ed.), Encyclopedia of Applied Ethics (Second Edition). pp. 113-120.
    Forgiveness and mercy are both generous responses to wrongdoing. Forgiveness is a personal reaction to wrongful harm. It can be expressed in emotional, verbal, or relational terms, and it can potentially express a number of important moral values. Controversial topics with regard to forgiveness include the possibility of unforgivable actions and of third-party, self, and group forgiveness. Recent political developments have invited philosophical reflection on public forgiveness. Mercy is usually theorized in relation to punishment, and it is understood to provide (...)
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  19. added 2019-05-16
    Anger and Punishment: Natural History and Normative Significance.Isaac Wiegman - 2014 - Dissertation, Washington University in St. Louis
    I argue that the evolutionary history of anger has substantive implications for normative ethics. In the process, I develop an evolutionary account of anger and its influence on action. First, I consider a prominent argument by Peter Singer and Joshua Greene. They conclude that evolutionary explanations of human cooperation debunk – or undercut the evidential value of – the moral intuitions supporting duty ethics (as opposed to utilitarian or consequentialist ethics). With this argument they aim to defend consequentialist theories. However, (...)
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  20. added 2019-05-13
    L. Muellner: The Anger of Achilles: Mênis in Greek Epic . Pp. Xii + 219. Ithaca, New York and London: Cornell University Press, 1996. £31.50. ISBN: 0-8014-3230-8. [REVIEW]N. Yamagata - 1997 - The Classical Review 47 (2):411-411.
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  21. added 2019-05-10
    Hope, Hate and Indignation: Spinoza on Political Emotion in the Trump Era.Ericka Tucker - 2018 - In M. B. Sable & A. J. Torres (eds.), Trump and Political Philosophy. New York, NY, USA: pp. 131-158.
    Can we ever have politics without the noble lie? Can we have a collective political identity that does not exclude or define ‘us’ as ‘not them’? In the Ethics, Spinoza argues that individual human emotions and imagination shape the social world. This world, he argues, can in turn be shaped by political institutions to be more or less hopeful, more or less rational, or more or less angry and indignant. In his political works, Spinoza offered suggestions for how to shape (...)
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  22. added 2019-05-06
    Cognitive Emotion and the Law.Harold Anthony Lloyd - 2016 - Law and Psychology Review 41.
    Many wrongly believe that emotion plays little or no role in legal reasoning. Unfortunately, Langdell and his “scientific” case method encourage this error. A careful review of analysis in the real world, however, belies this common belief. Emotion can be cognitive, and cognition can be emotional. Additionally, modern neuroscience underscores the “co-dependence” of reason and emotion. Thus, even if law were a certain science of appellate cases (which it is not), emotion could not be torn from such “science.” -/- As (...)
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  23. added 2019-02-14
    L’indignation : ses variétés et ses rôles dans la régulation sociale.Frédéric Minner - 2019 - Implications Philosophiques 1.
    Qu’est-ce que l’indignation ? Cette émotion est souvent conçue comme une émotion morale qu’une tierce-partie éprouve vis-à-vis des injustices qu’un agent inflige à un patient. L’indignation aurait ainsi trait aux injustices et serait éprouvée par des individus qui n’en seraient eux-mêmes pas victimes. Cette émotion motiverait la tierce-partie indignée à tenter de réguler l’injustice en l’annulant et en punissant son auteur. Cet article entreprend de montrer que cette conception de l’indignation n’est que partielle. En effet, l’indignation ne porte pas que (...)
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  24. added 2018-10-26
    The Errors and Limitations of Our “Anger-Evaluating” Ways.Myisha Cherry - 2018 - In Myisha Cherry & Owen Flanagan (eds.), The Moral Psychology of Anger. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 49-65.
    In this chapter I give an account of how our judgments of anger often play out in certain political instances. While contemporary philosophers of emotion have provided us with check box guides like “fittingness” and “size” for evaluating anger, I will argue that these guides do not by themselves help us escape the tendency to mark or unmark the boxes selectively, inconsistently, and erroneously. If anger—particularly anger in a political context—can provide information and spark positive change or political destruction, then (...)
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  25. added 2018-08-31
    Anger and Forgiveness: Resentment, Generosity, Justice. [REVIEW]Isaac Wiegman - 2019 - Philosophical Quarterly 69 (274):217-220.
    Anger and Forgiveness: Resentment, Generosity, Justice. By Nussbaum Martha.
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  26. added 2018-07-14
    Anger as a Political Emotion: A Phenomenological Perspective.Celine Leboeuf - 2017 - In Myisha Cherry & Owen Flanagan (eds.), The Moral Psychology of Anger. pp. 15-30.
    My essay discusses the politics of anger from a phenomenological perspective. Philosophers such as Martha Nussbaum have examined the importance of emotions for achieving social justice. In Anger and Forgiveness, Nussbaum criticizes most forms of anger for including the desire to retaliate, but identifies a species of anger, “Transition-Anger,” which can motivate us to respond to wrongdoing. In a similar vein, I claim that anger can help the oppressed respond to their oppression. To defend this claim, I consider cases in (...)
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  27. added 2018-05-14
    Anger and Approbation.Lee A. Mcbride Iii - 2018 - In Myisha Cherry & Owen Flanagan (eds.), The Moral Psychology of Anger. New York, USA: Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 1-13.
    Martha Nussbaum argues that “garden-variety anger” is normatively irrational, politically unnecessary, and inevitably destructive (Nussbaum 2015). Anger, on this account, is portrayed as a primitive vestige of bygone days, an impediment to the genuine pursuit of justice and the honoring of obligations. Yet, on Nussbaum’s account, there is one exception: “transitional anger” – anger that quickly transitions into compassionate hope, focusing on future welfare. Martin Luther King, Jr. is evoked as an exemplar here. In response, this paper revisits Aristotle’s Nicomachean (...)
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  28. added 2018-05-09
    "On Anger, Silence and Epistemic Injustice".Alison Bailey - 2018 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 84:93-115.
    Abstract: If anger is the emotion of injustice, and if most injustices have prominent epistemic dimensions, then where is the anger in epistemic injustice? Despite the question my task is not to account for the lack of attention to anger in epistemic injustice discussions. Instead, I argue that a particular texture of transformative anger – a knowing resistant anger – offers marginalized knowers a powerful resource for countering epistemic injustice. I begin by making visible the anger that saturates the silences (...)
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  29. added 2018-04-15
    Virtuous and Vicious Anger.Bommarito Nicolas - 2017 - Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 11 (3):1-28.
    I defend an account of when and why anger is morally virtuous or vicious. Anger often manifests what we care about; a sports fan gets angry when her favorite team loses because she cares about the team doing well. Anger, I argue, is made morally virtuous or vicious by the underlying care or concern. Anger is virtuous when it manifests moral concern and vicious when it manifests moral indifference or ill will. In defending this view, I reject two common views (...)
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  30. added 2018-04-15
    Bile & Bodhisattvas: Śāntideva on Justified Anger.Nicolas Bommarito - 2011 - Journal of Buddhist Ethics 18:357-81.
    In his famous text the Bodhicaryāvatāra, the 8th century Buddhist philosopher Śāntideva argues that anger towards people who harm us is never justified. The usual reading of this argument rests on drawing similarities between harms caused by persons and those caused by non-persons. After laying out my own interpretation of Śāntideva's reasoning, I offer some objections to Śāntideva's claim about the similarity between animate and inanimate causes of harm inspired by contemporary philosophical literature in the West. Following this, I argue (...)
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  31. added 2018-02-17
    Anger and Moral Judgment.Glen Pettigrove - 2014 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 92 (2):269-286.
    Although theorists disagree about precisely how to characterize the link between anger and moral judgment, that they are linked is routinely taken for granted in contemporary metaethics and philosophy of emotion. One problem with this assumption is that it ignores virtues like patience, which thinkers as different as Cassian, Śāntideva, and Maimonides have argued are characteristic of mature moral agents. The patient neither experience nor plan to experience anger in response to (at least some) wrongs. Nevertheless, we argue, they remain (...)
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  32. added 2018-02-15
    Anger and Forgiveness: Resentment, Generosity, Justice.Martha C. Nussbaum - 2016 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    In this volume based on her 2014 Locke Lectures, Martha C. Nussbaum provides a bracing new view that strips the notion of forgiveness down to its Judeo-Christian roots, where it was structured by the moral relationship between a score-keeping God and penitent, self-abasing, and erring mortals.
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  33. added 2018-02-15
    The Geography of Morals: Varieties of Moral Possibility.Owen Flanagan - 2016 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    The Geography of Morals is a work of extraordinary ambition: an indictment of the parochialism of Western philosophy, a comprehensive dialogue between cultural and psychological anthropology, recent work in empirical moral psychology, behavioral economics, and cross-cultural philosophy.
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  34. added 2018-02-15
    Meekness and 'Moral' Anger.Glen Pettigrove - 2012 - Ethics 122 (2):341-370.
    If asked to generate a list of virtues, most people would not include meekness. So it is surprising that Hume not only deems it a virtue, but one whose 'tendency to the good of society no one can doubt of.' After explaining what Hume and his contemporaries meant by "meekness", the paper proceeds to argue that meekness is a virtue we, too, should endorse.
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  35. added 2018-02-15
    Anger, Virtue, and Oppression.Macalester Bell - 2009 - In Lisa Tessman (ed.), Feminist Ethics and Social and Political Philosophy: Theorizing the Non-Ideal. Springer. pp. 165--183.
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  36. added 2018-01-09
    Anger and Forgiveness: Resentment, Generosity, Justice. [REVIEW]Mary Carman - 2016 - Philosophical Papers 45 (1-2):335-341.
    A critical review of Martha Nussbaum's 2016 book, Anger and Forgiveness: Resentment, Generosity, Justice.
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  37. added 2017-12-11
    Valuing Anger.Antti Kauppinen - 2018 - In Myisha Cherry & Owen Flanagan (eds.), The Moral Psychology of Anger. Rowman & Littlefield.
    It is widely acknowledged that susceptibility to suitable emotional responses is part of what it is to value something. Indeed, the value of at least some things calls for such emotional responses – if we lack them, we don’t respond appropriately to their value. In this paper, I argue that susceptibility to anger is an essential component of valuing other people, ourselves, and our relationships. The main reason is that various modes of valuing, such as respect, self-respect, and love, ground (...)
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  38. added 2017-08-10
    Forgiveness and Reconciliation.Barrett Emerick - 2017 - In Kathryn J. Norlock (ed.), The Moral Psychology of Forgiveness. London, UK: Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 117-134.
    Forgiveness and reconciliation are central to moral life; after all, everyone will be wronged by others and will then face the dual decisions of whether to forgive and whether to reconcile. It is therefore important that we have a clear analysis of each, as well as a thoroughly articulated understanding of how they relate to and differ from each other. -/- Forgiveness has received considerably more attention in the Western philosophical literature than has reconciliation. In this paper I aim to (...)
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  39. added 2017-03-08
    Philosophical Perspectives on Negative Emotions: Shadows of the Soul.Christine Tappolet, Fabrice Teroni & Anita Konzelman Ziv - 2018 - Routledge.
    Negative emotions are familiar enough, but they have rarely been a topic of study in their own right. This volume brings together fourteen chapters on negative emotions, written in a highly accessible style for non-specialists and specialists alike. It starts with chapters on general issues raised by negative emotions, such as the nature of valence, the theoretical implications of nasty emotions, the role of negative emotions in fiction, as well as the puzzles raised by ambivalent and mixed emotions. The second (...)
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  40. added 2017-01-29
    A Cinematheque Annotation of Kenneth Anger's 1981 Underground Film, 'Lucifer Rising'.James Magrini - unknown
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  41. added 2017-01-17
    Deities Who “Turn Back” From Anger. Rahmouni & Levine - 2016 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 136 (2):235.
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  42. added 2017-01-17
    Chapter 11. Anger in Asterix: The Metaphorical Representation of Anger in Comics and Animated Films.Eduardo Urios-Aparisi & Charles J. Forceville - 2009 - In Eduardo Urios-Aparisi & Charles J. Forceville (eds.), Multimodal Metaphor. Mouton de Gruyter.
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  43. added 2017-01-17
    Chapter 9. Looking Back at Anger. Cultural Traditions and Metaphorical Patterns.Dirk Geeraerts - 2006 - In Words and Other Wonders: Papers on Lexical and Semantic Topics. Mouton de Gruyter.
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  44. added 2017-01-17
    Anger and Aggression in Policewomen and Administrative Employees: An Experimental Study.Stephanie H. M. Van Goozen, Prien Goederee, Nico H. Frijda, Matty Chiva & Clara Petitjean - 1994 - Social Science Information 33 (3):533-551.
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  45. added 2017-01-16
    Transitional Anger.Martha C. Nussbaum - 2015 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 1 (1):41--56.
    ABSTRACT ABSTRACT: A close philosophical analysis of the emotion of anger will show that it is normatively irrational: in some cases, based on futile magical thinking, in others, based on defective values.
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  46. added 2017-01-16
    A Study of Anger.Arthur Allin - 1899 - Psychological Review 6 (6):664-666.
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  47. added 2016-11-15
    From Indignation to Norms Against Violence in Occupy Geneva: A Case Study for the Problem of the Emergence of Norms.Frédéric Minner - 2015 - Social Science Information 54 (4):497-524.
    Why and how do norms emerge? Which norms emerge and why these ones in particular? Such questions belong to the ‘problem of the emergence of norms’, which consists of an inquiry into the production of norms in social collectives. I address this question through the ethnographic study of the emergence of ‘norms against violence’ in the political collective Occupy Geneva. I do this, first, empirically, with the analysis of my field observations; and, second, theoretically, by discussing my findings. In consequence (...)
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  48. added 2016-10-29
    Love and Resistance: Moral Solidarity in the Face of Perceptual Failure.Barrett Emerick - 2016 - Feminist Philosophy Quarterly 2 (2):1-21.
    In this paper I explore how we ought to respond to the problematic inner lives of those that we love. I argue for an understanding of love that is radical and challenging—a powerful form of resistance within the confines of everyday relationships. I argue that love, far from the platitudinous and saccharine view, does not call for our acceptance of others’ failings. Instead, loving another means believing in their potential to grow and holding them to account when they fail. I (...)
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  49. added 2016-10-18
    The Evolution of Retribution: Intuitions Undermined.Isaac Wiegman - 2017 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 98 (2):490-510.
    Recent empirical work suggests that emotions are responsible for anti-consequentialist intuitions. For instance, anger places value on actions of revenge and retribution, value not derived from the consequences of these actions. As a result, it contributes to the development of retributive intuitions. I argue that if anger evolved to produce these retributive intuitions because of their biological consequences, then these intuitions are not a good indicator that punishment has value apart from its consequences. This severs the evidential connection between retributive (...)
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  50. added 2015-09-29
    Articulate Forgiveness and Normative Constraints.Brandon Warmke - 2015 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 45 (4):1-25.
    Philosophers writing on forgiveness typically defend the Resentment Theory of Forgiveness, the view that forgiveness is the overcoming of resentment. Rarely is much more said about the nature of resentment or how it is overcome when one forgives. Pamela Hieronymi, however, has advanced detailed accounts both of the nature of resentment and how one overcomes resentment when one forgives. In this paper, I argue that Hieronymi’s account of the nature of forgiveness is committed to two implausible claims about the norms (...)
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1 — 50 / 128