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  1. Animal Welfare and Animal Pain: Can Pain Sometimes Be Worse for Them Than for Us?Sahar Akhtar - 2011 - In The Oxford Handbook on Ethics and Animals.
  2. Fish Cognition and Consciousness.Colin Allen - 2013 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (1):25-39.
    Questions about fish consciousness and cognition are receiving increasing attention. In this paper, I explain why one must be careful to avoid drawing conclusions too hastily about this hugely diverse set of species.
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  3. Deciphering Animal Pain.Colin Allen - 2005 - In Murat Aydede (ed.), Pain: New Essays on Its Nature and the Methodology of Its Study. Cambridge MA: Bradford Book/MIT Press.
    In this paper we1 assess the potential for research on nonhuman animals to address questions about the phenomenology of painful experiences. Nociception, the basic capacity for sensing noxious stimuli, is widespread in the animal kingdom. Even rel- atively primitive animals such as leeches and sea slugs possess nociceptors, neurons that are functionally specialized for sensing noxious stimuli (Walters 1996). Vertebrate spinal cords play a sophisticated role in processing and modulating nociceptive signals, providing direct control of some motor responses to noxious (...)
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  4. Animal Pain.Colin Allen - 2004 - Noûs 38 (4):617–643.
    Which nonhuman animals experience conscious pain?1 This question is central to the debate about animal welfare, as well as being of basic interest to scientists and philosophers of mind. Nociception—the capacity to sense noxious stimuli—is one of the most primitive sensory capacities. Neurons functionally specialized for nociception have been described in invertebrates such as the leech Hirudo medicinalis and the marine snail Aplysia californica (Walters 1996). Is all nociception accompanied by conscious pain, even in relatively primitive animals such as Aplysia, (...)
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  5. The Discovery of Animal Consciousness: An Optimistic Assessment. [REVIEW]Colin Allen - 1997 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 10 (3):217-225.
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  6. Species of Mind: The Philosophy and Biology of Cognitive Ethology.Colin Allen & Marc Bekoff - 1997 - MIT Press.
    The heart of this book is the reciprocal relationship between philosophical theories of mind and empirical studies of animal cognition.
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  7. Animal Consciousness.Colin Allen & Mark Bekoff - 2007 - In Max Velmans & Susan Schneider (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to Consciousness. Blackwell.
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  8. Animal Consciousness.Colin Allen & Michael Trestman - 2005 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  9. Materialism and Reductionism in the Study of Animal Consciousness.Garland E. Allen - 1987 - In G. Greenberg & E. Tobach (eds.), Cognition, Language, and Consciousness: Integrative Levels. Lawrence Erlbaum. pp. 137--160.
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  10. Inter-Species Variation in Colour Perception.Keith Allen - 2008 - Philosophical Studies 142 (2):197 - 220.
    Inter-species variation in colour perception poses a serious problem for the view that colours are mind-independent properties. Given that colour perception varies so drastically across species, which species perceives colours as they really are? In this paper, I argue that all do. Specifically, I argue that members of different species perceive properties that are determinates of different, mutually compatible, determinables. This is an instance of a general selectionist strategy for dealing with cases of perceptual variation. According to selectionist views, objects (...)
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  11. So THAT'S What It's Like!Sean Allen-Hermanson - forthcoming - In Companion to the Philosophy of Animal Minds. Routledge.
    Many philosophers have held that we cannot say what it is like to be a bat as they present a fundamentally alien form of life. Another view held by some philosophers, bat scientists, and even many laypersons is that echolocation is, somehow, at least in part, a kind of visual experience. Either way, bat echolocation is taken to be something very mysterious and exotic. I utilize empirical and intuitive considerations to support an alternative view making a much more mundane contention (...)
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  12. Is Cortex Necessary?Sean Allen-Hermanson - 2016 - Animal Sentience 1 (3).
    A key contention of Klein & Barron (2016) is that consciousness does not depend on cortical structures. A critical appraisal suggests they have overestimated the strength of their evidence.
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  13. Strong Neurophilosophy and the Matter of Bat Consciousness: A Case Study.Sean Allen-Hermanson - 2015 - Erkenntnis 80 (1):57-76.
    In “What is it like to be boring and myopic?” Kathleen Akins offers an interesting, empirically driven, argument for thinking that there is nothing that it is like to be a bat. She suggests that bats are “boring” in the sense that they are governed by behavioral scripts and simple, non-representational, control loops, and are best characterized as biological automatons. Her approach has been well received by philosophers sympathetic to empirically informed philosophy of mind. But, despite its influence, her work (...)
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  14. Blindsight in Monkeys: Lost and (Perhaps) Found.Sean Allen-Hermanson - 2010 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 17 (1-2): 47-71.
    Stoerig and Cowey’s work is widely regarded as showing that monkeys with lesions in the primary visual cortex have blindsight. However, Mole and Kelly persuasively argue that the experimental results are compatible with an alternative hypothesis positing only a deficit in attention and perceptual working memory. I describe a revised procedure which can distinguish these hypotheses, and offer reasons for thinking that the blindsight hypothesis provides a superior explanation. The study of blindsight might contribute towards a general investigation into animal (...)
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  15. Insects and the Problem of Simple Minds: Are Bees Natural Zombies?Sean Allen-Hermanson - 2008 - Journal of Philosophy 105 (8): 389-415.
    This paper explores the idea that many “simple minded” invertebrates are “natural zombies” in that they utilize their senses in intelligent ways, but without phenomenal awareness. The discussion considers how “first-order” representationalist theories of consciousness meet the explanatory challenge posed by blindsight. It would be an advantage of first-order representationalism, over higher-order versions, if it does not rule out consciousness in most non-human animals. However, it is argued that a first-order representationalism which adequately accounts for blindsight also implies that most (...)
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  16. The Animal Mind: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Animal Cognition.Kristin Andrews - 2014 - Routledge.
    The study of animal cognition raises profound questions about the minds of animals and philosophy of mind itself. Aristotle argued that humans are the only animal to laugh, but in recent experiments rats have also been shown to laugh. In other experiments, dogs have been shown to respond appropriately to over two hundred words in human language. In this introduction to the philosophy of animal minds Kristin Andrews introduces and assesses the essential topics, problems and debates as they cut across (...)
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  17. Interpreting the Baboon. [REVIEW]Kristin Andrews - 2008 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 12 (1):5-6.
  18. The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Animal Minds.Kristin Andrews & Jacob Beck (eds.) - 2017 - Routledge.
    While philosophers have been interested in animals since ancient times, in the last few decades the subject of animal minds has emerged as a major topic in philosophy. _The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Animal Minds_ is an outstanding reference source to the key topics, problems and debates in this exciting subject and is the first collection of its kind. Comprising nearly fifty chapters by a team of international contributors, the _Handbook_ is divided into eight parts: Mental representation Reasoning and (...)
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  19. Confronting Language, Representation, and Belief: A Limited Defense of Mental Continuity.Kristin Andrews & Ljiljana Radenovic - 2012 - In Todd Shackelford & Jennifer Vonk (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Comparative Evolutionary Psychology. New York, USA: Oxford University Press. pp. 39-60.
    According to the mental continuity claim (MCC), human mental faculties are physical and beneficial to human survival, so they must have evolved gradually from ancestral forms and we should expect to see their precursors across species. Materialism of mind coupled with Darwin’s evolutionary theory leads directly to such claims and even today arguments for animal mental properties are often presented with the MCC as a premise. However, the MCC has been often challenged among contemporary scholars. It is usually argued that (...)
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  20. Consciousness in Animals.Tim Appleton - 1976 - Zygon 11 (December):337-345.
  21. Visual Cognition in Social Insects.A. Avarguès-Weber, N. Deisig & M. Giurfa - 2011 - Annu. Rev. Entomol 56:423-443.
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  22. Subjective Experience is Probably Not Limited to Humans: The Evidence From Neurobiology and Behavior.Bernard J. Baars - 2005 - Consciousness and Cognition 14 (1):7-21.
    In humans, conscious perception and cognition depends upon the thalamocortical complex, which supports perception, explicit cognition, memory, language, planning, and strategic control. When parts of the T-C system are damaged or stimulated, corresponding effects are found on conscious contents and state, as assessed by reliable reports. In contrast, large regions like cerebellum and basal ganglia can be damaged without affecting conscious cognition directly. Functional brain recordings also show robust activity differences in cortex between experimentally matched conscious and unconscious events. This (...)
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  23. There Are No Known Differences in Brain Mechanisms of Consciousness Between Humans and Other Mammals.Bernard J. Baars - 2001 - Animal Welfare Supplement 10:31- 40.
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  24. La vie végétative des animaux : la destruction heideggérienne de l'animalité.Christiane Bailey - 2007 - Phaenex 2 (2):81-123.
    La déconstruction heideggérienne de l’animalité qui a lieu dans les Concepts fondamentaux de la métaphysique va jusqu’à faire disparaître l’idée même d’une vie animale , d’une vie propre aux animaux. La vie, comme le disait déjà Heidegger dans Être et temps , est « un mode d’être propre », ce qui veut dire, comme le confirmera le cours de 1929-1930, que la vie est « le mode d’être de l’animal et de la plante ». D’emblée conçus comme « organismes », (...)
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  25. The Unheeded Cry: Animal Consciousness, Animal Pain and Science.M. Balls - 1991 - Journal of Medical Ethics 17 (2):109-109.
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  26. Perspectives in Ethology, Volume 9: Human Understanding and Animal Awareness.P. P. G. Bateson & P. H. Klopfer - 1991 - Plenum Press.
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  27. Ethical Debates About Animal Suffering and the Use of Animals in Research.Patrick Bateson - 2011 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 18 (9-10):9-10.
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  28. Do Animals Need a Theory of Mind?Michael Bavidge & ian Ground - 2009 - In I. Leudar & A. Costall (eds.), Against Theory of Mind‎. Palgrave. pp. 167--188.
    This book brings together disparate strands of ToM research, lays out historical roots of the idea, and indicates better alternatives.
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  29. Studying the Thinking of Non-Human Animals.William Bechtel - 1992 - Biology and Philosophy 7 (2):209-215.
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  30. The Public Lives of Animals: A Troubled Scientist, Pissy Baboons, Angry Elephants, and Happy Hounds.Marc Bekoff - 2006 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 13 (5):115-131.
  31. Animal Passions and Beastly Virtues: Cognitive Ethology as the Unifying Science for Understanding the Subjective, Emotional, Empathic, and Moral Lives of Animals.Marc Bekoff - 2006 - Zygon 41 (1):71-104.
  32. Considering Animals--Not Higher Primates.Marc Bekoff - 2003 - Zygon 38 (2):229-245.
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  33. Scientific Ideology, Animal Consciousness, and Animal Protection: A Principled Plea for Unabashed Common Sense.Marc Bekoff - 1992 - New Ideas in Psychology 10:79-94.
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  34. The Animal's Point of View, Animal Welfare and Some Other Related Matters.Marc Bekoff - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):753-755.
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  35. The Cognitive Animal: Empirical and Theoretical Perspectives on Animal Cognition.Marc Bekoff, Colin Allen & Gordon M. Burghardt (eds.) - 2002 - MIT Press.
    The fifty-seven original essays in this book provide a comprehensive overview of the interdisciplinary field of animal cognition.
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  36. Readings in Animal Cognition.Marc Bekoff & Dale W. Jamieson (eds.) - 1996 - MIT Press.
    This collection of 24 readings is the first comprehensive treatment of important topics by leading figures in the rapidly growing interdisciplinary field of...
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  37. A Neuropsychological and Evolutionary Approach to Animal Consciousness and Animal Suffering.B. Bermond - 2001 - Animal Welfare Supplement 10:47- 62.
  38. Animal Consciousness.Majid Beshkar - 2008 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (3):5-33.
    There are several types of behavioural evidence in favour of the notion that many animal species experience at least some simple levels of consciousness. Other than behavioural evidence, there are a number of anatomical and physiological criteria that help resolve the problem of animal consciousness, particularly when addressing the problem in lower vertebrates and invertebrates. In this paper, I review a number of such behavioural and brain- based evidence in the case of mammals, birds, and some invertebrate species. Cumulative evidence (...)
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  39. Introduction.Lisa Bortolotti & Andrew Wright - 2011 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 18 (9-10):9-10.
    Introduction to a special issue of the Journal of Consciousness Studies on Pain and the Experience of Pain.
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  40. Consciousness in Nonhuman Animals: Adopting the Precautionary Principle.R. H. Bradshaw - 1998 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 5 (1):108-14.
    The existence of consciousness in animals may have been overlooked. Continuity in consciousness between humans and animals is predicted by evolutionary theory. However, there are specific methodological difficulties associated with investigating such a phenomenon: it cannot be directly measured; animals, unlike humans, cannot directly tell us about their conscious experience; experiments which have made comparisons to human consciousness cannot detect consciousness of a different form; application of the law of parsimony in science has traditionally led to the conclusion that it (...)
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  41. The Value of the Consumer Demand Model to the Science of Animal Welfare.R. Harry Bradshaw & Norma E. Bubier - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (4):747.
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  42. Animal Consciousness, Anthromorphism and Heterophenomenology.Manuel Bremer - 2006 - Philosophisches Jahrbuch 113 (2):397-410.
  43. Animal Consciousness as a Test Case of Cognitive Science.Manuel Bremer - 2005 - In Bewusstsein: Interdisziplinäre Perspektiven.
    In our dealings with animals at least most of us see them as conscious beings. On the other hand the employment of human categories to animals seems to be problematic. Reflecting on the details of human beliefs, for example, casts serious doubt on whether the cat is able to believe anything at all. These theses try to reflect on methodological issues when investigating animal minds. Developing a theory of animal mentality seems to be a test case of the interdisciplinary research (...)
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  44. Animal Awareness: Current Perceptions and Historical Perspective.Gordon M. Burghardt - 1985 - American Psychologist 40:905-919.
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  45. Evolutionary Epistemology: A Multiparadigm Program.Werner Callebaut & R. Pinxten (eds.) - 1987 - Reidel.
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  46. Why the Question of Animal Consciousness Might Not Matter Very Much.Peter Carruthers - 2005 - Philosophical Psychology 18 (1):83-102.
    According to higher-order thought accounts of phenomenal consciousness it is unlikely that many non-human animals undergo phenomenally conscious experiences. Many people believe that this result would have deep and far-reaching consequences. More specifically, they believe that the absence of phenomenal consciousness from the rest of the animal kingdom must mark a radical and theoretically significant divide between ourselves and other animals, with important implications for comparative psychology. I shall argue that this belief is mistaken. Since phenomenal consciousness might be almost (...)
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  47. Consciousness Might Matter Very Much - Reply.Peter Carruthers - 2005 - Philosophical Psychology 18 (1):113-122.
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  48. Reply to Shriver and Allen.Peter Carruthers - 2005 - Philosophical Psychology 18 (1):113-122.
    Shriver and Allen (this volume, this journal; hereafter S&A) make three unconnected criticisms of my views concerning phenomenal consciousness and the question of animal consciousness. First, they claim that my dispositional higher-order thought theory of consciousness has much greater significance for ethics than I recognize. Second, they claim that, in the course of attempting to motivate that theory, I have presented inadequate criticisms of first-order theories (according to which phenomenal consciousness may well be rampant in the animal world). And third, (...)
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  49. Suffering Without Subjectivity.Peter Carruthers - 2004 - Philosophical Studies 121 (2):99-125.
    This paper argues that it is possible for suffering to occur in the absence of phenomenal consciousness – in the absence of a certain sort of experiential subjectivity, that is. (Phenomenal consciousness is the property that some mental states possess, when it is like something to undergo them, or when they have subjective feels, or possess qualia.) So even if theories of phenomenal consciousness that would withhold such consciousness from most species of non-human animal are correct, this neednt mean that (...)
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  50. On Being Simple Minded.Peter Carruthers - 2004 - American Philosophical Quarterly 41 (3):205-220.
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