About this topic
Summary

Broadly construed, animal ethics is an area of inquiry and debate that focuses on a variety of approaches to assessing the moral status of nonhuman animals. One of the main approaches in contemporary scholarship is deontological and argues for strict rights for animals on the grounds that they are subjects-of-a-life (Tom Regan) and thus possess inherent worth; such views often seek to expand Kant's ascription of inherent worth to rational agents so that it applies to all sentient beings. Other views, including those of some secular naturalists, seek to ascribe moral status to animals not on the basis of inherent worth but on the basis of capacities shared by all sentient beings. Another main approach encompasses a variety of views that tend to be "welfarist" in the sense that they do not seek to ascribe strict right to animals but instead argue that certain actions performed against animals (such as killing them or using them as sources of milk or eggs) are permissible as long as human beings perform them in a humane manner. Welfarist views are generally utilitarian in character, being based on calculations of the quantity of harm that can be done to a given living being, and they tend to assert hierarchies in which beings that are cognitively more sophisticated can be harmed in ways in which beings that are cognitively less sophisticated cannot; on the basis of such hierarchization, welfarist views typically ascribe moral superiority to human beings over nonhuman animals, although they also tend to avoid a speciesistic privileging of all human beings over all nonhuman animals on the grounds that some nonhuman animals are cognitively superior to some human beings. Thus thinkers such as Peter Singer argue that self-conscious beings have a stronger claim to life than non-self-conscious beings, where self-conscious beings are defined as those that can conceptualize the past, present, and future of their lives as one coherent whole. (Summary written by Gary Steiner and Erwin Lengauer)

Key works

Armstrong, Susan /  Botzler, Richard (ed.) ²2008. The Animal Ethics Reader - (AER). 2nd Edition. London; New York, NY, Routledge. 

Beauchamp, Tom L. / Frey, Raymond G. (eds.) 2011. The Oxford Handbook of Animal Ethics. Oxford, Oxford University Press.

Bekoff, Marc (ed.) 2010. Encyclopedia of Animal Rights and Animal Welfare. 2 Volume Set. Santa Barbara, CA, Greenwood Press, Imprint of ABC - Clio. 

Cavalieri, Paola 2001. The Animal Question: Why Non-Human Animals Deserve Human Rights. Oxford, Oxford University Press. 

Chapouthier, Georges (ed.) 1998. The Universal Declaration of Animal Rights: Comments and Intentions. Paris, Ligue Francaise des Droit de l´Animal.

DeGrazia, David (1996). Taking Animals Seriously. Mental Life and Moral Status. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Dombrowski, Daniel A. 1997. Babies and Beasts: The Argument from Marginal Cases. Urbana, IL, University of Illinois Press.

Francione, Gary  2008. Animals as Persons: Essays on the Abolition of Animal Exploitation. New York, NY, Columbia University Press.

Garner, Robert 2005. The Political Theory of Animal Rights (Perspectives on Democratization). Manchester, Manchester University Press.

Kalof, Linda / Fitzgerald, Amy (eds.). 2007. The Animals Reader: The Essential Classic and Contemporary Writings. Oxford, Berg.  

Munro, Lyle 2005. Confronting Cruelty. Moral Orthodoxy and the Challenge of the Animal Rights Movement. Human-Animal Studies.  (Dissertation). Leiden, Brill Academic.     

Palmer, Clare (ed.) 2008. Animal Rights. Clare Palmer. Series: The International Library of Essays on Rights. Aldershot, GB, Ashgate Publishing Company.

Pluhar, Evelyn 1995. Beyond Prejudice. The Moral Significance of Human and Nonhuman Animals. Durham, NC, Duke University Press.

Regan, Tom 1983. The Case for Animal Rights. Berkeley, CA, University of California Press.

Rollin, Bernard  ²1992. Animal Rights and Human Morality. Amherst, Prometheus.

Rowlands, Mark ²2009. Animal Rights. Moral Theory and Practice. London, Macmillan Press.

Sapontzis, Steve F. 1987, ²1992. Morals, Reason and Animals. Philadelphia, PA, Temple University Press.

Singer, Peter 1975, ²1990. Animal Liberation. A New Ethics for our Treatment of Animals. New York, NY, New York Review of Book.

Singer, Peter (ed.) 2006. In Defense of Animals. The Second Wave. Malden, Blackwell.

Steiner, Gary 2008. Animals and the Moral Community: Mental Life, Moral Status, and Kinship. New York, NY, Columbia University Press.

Steiner, Gary. 2013. Animals and the Limits of Postmodernism. New York: Columbia University Press.

Introductions Regan, Tom 2001. Animals, treatment of. In: Becker, Lawrence (ed.). Encyclopedia of Ethics. New York, Routledge: 70-74 (on page 72 about Inherentism)

Regan, Tom ³2004. Animal Welfare and Rights. In:  Post, Stephen (ed.). Encyclopedia of Bioethics. 3. edition. New York, NY, Macmillan. E-Book Version

Wilson, Scott 2010. Animals and Ethics In: Fieser, James (ed.). Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Martin, TN, The University of Tennessee at Martin. –

Wise, Steve M. 2011. animal rights. Encyclopaedia Britannica: Retrieved from http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/25760/animal-rights 

Related categories

4596 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 4596
Material to categorize
  1. Journal of Animal Ethics. [REVIEW]Jeremy D. Yunt - 2020 - Journal of Animal Ethics 10:93-96.
    A review of Abbey-Anne Smith's book "Animals in Tillich's Philosophical Theology.".
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. The Value of Being Wild: A Phenomenological Approach to Wildlife Conservation.Adam Cruise - 2020 - Dissertation, University of Stellenbosch
    Given that one-million species are currently threatened with extinction and that humans are undermining the entire natural infrastructure on which our modern world depends (IPBES, 2019), this dissertation will show that there is a need to provide an alternative approach to wildlife conservation, one that avoids anthropocentrism and wildlife valuation on an instrumental basis to provide meaningful and tangible success for both wildlife conservation and human well-being in an inclusive way. In this sense, The Value of Being Wild will showcase (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Making Veterinary Ethics More Ethical.John Rossi - 2020 - Journal of Animal Ethics 10 (1):73.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. How the Suffering of Nonhuman Animals and Humans in Animal Research is Interconnected.Nina Kranke - 2020 - Journal of Animal Ethics 10 (1):41.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. A Critique of Some Appeals to Science in Animal Ethics.Thomas Lepeltier - 2020 - Journal of Animal Ethics 10 (1):33.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. The Attribution of Limited Legal Personality to Nonhuman Species.Veerle Platvoet - 2020 - Journal of Animal Ethics 10 (1):49.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Secondary Victimization of Animals in Criminal Procedure: Lessons From Switzerland.Charlotte E. Blattner - 2020 - Journal of Animal Ethics 10 (1):1.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. The Unnaturalness Objection to De-Extinction: A Critical Evaluation.Carolyn Mason - 2017 - Animal Studies Journal 6 (1):40-60.
    The Unnaturalness Objection to De-Extinction: A Critical Evaluation Carolyn Mason, University of Canterbury, New Zealand Abstract De-extinction of species has been criticised for being unnatural, as have the techniques that might be used to accomplish de-extinction. This objection of unnaturalness will be dismissed by those who claim that everything that humans do is natural, by those who claim that naturalness is a social construct, and by those who argue that ethical concerns arising from considerations of unnaturalness rest on a failure (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  9. How to Tell If Animals Can Understand Death.Susana Monsó - forthcoming - Erkenntnis:1-20.
    It is generally assumed that humans are the only animals who can possess a concept of death. However, the ubiquity of death in nature and the evolutionary advantages that would come with an understanding of death provide two prima facie reasons for doubting this assumption. In this paper, my intention is not to defend that animals of this or that nonhuman species possess a concept of death, but rather to examine how we could go about empirically determining whether animals can (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  10. Don’T Demean “Invasives”: Conservation and Wrongful Species Discrimination.C. E. Abbate & Bob Fischer - 2019 - Animals 871 (9).
    It is common for conservationists to refer to non-native species that have undesirable impacts on humans as “invasive”. We argue that the classification of any species as “invasive” constitutes wrongful discrimination. Moreover, we argue that its being wrong to categorize a species as invasive is perfectly compatible with it being morally permissible to kill animals—assuming that conservationists “kill equally”. It simply is not compatible with the double standard that conservationists tend to employ in their decisions about who lives and who (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Why Kant Animals Have Rights?Alexander Howell - 2019 - Journal of Animal Ethics 9 (2):137.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Investigating the Elasticity of Meat Consumption for Climate Mitigation: 4Rs for Responsible Meat Use.Sophia Efstathiou - 2019 - In Eija Vinnari & Markus Vinnari (eds.), Sustainable Governance and Management of Food Systems: Ethical Perspectives. Wageningen, Netherlands: pp. 19-25.
    Our main research question is how pliable Norwegian meat consumption practices are. However it is not any type of elasticity we are interested in. We are specifically interested in the scope for what we dub the “4Rs” of responsible meat consumption within existing food systems: 1. Reducing the amount of animal-based proteins used 2. Replacing animal-based protein with plant-based, or insect-based alternatives 3. Refining processes of utilization of animal-based protein to minimize emissions, loss and waste 4. Recognising animal-based protein as (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Food, Animals, and the Environment: An Ethical Approach; By Christopher Schlottmann and Jeff Sebo. [REVIEW]Kyle Johannsen - 2019 - Philosophy in Review 39 (4):206-8.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. In Search of Pedigrees: Why Do We Harm the Dogs We Love?Randall Lockwood - 2019 - Journal of Animal Ethics 9 (2):220.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Are Zoos and Aquariums Justifiable? A Utilitarian Evaluation of Two Prominent Arguments.Stephen Bennett - 2019 - Journal of Animal Ethics 9 (2):177.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. A Critique of the Cultural Defense of Animal Cruelty.Elisa Galgut - 2019 - Journal of Animal Ethics 9 (2):184.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. Consequentialism and Thought Experiments in Philosophy Comes to Dinner.Robert Lazo - 2019 - Journal of Animal Ethics 9 (2):212.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Does In Vitro Meat Constitute Animal Liberation?Nathan Poirier & Joshua Russell - 2019 - Journal of Animal Ethics 9 (2):199.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Can “Conservation Hunting” Be Ethically Justified?Matthew Colin Sayce - 2019 - Journal of Animal Ethics 9 (2):170.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. Eternal Mirroring: Charles Patterson's Treatment of Animals and the Holocaust.Natalie Woodward - 2019 - Journal of Animal Ethics 9 (2):158.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. The Recognition of Animal Sentience by the Law.Charlotte E. Blattner - 2019 - Journal of Animal Ethics 9 (2):121.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. Why Kant Animals Have Rights?Alex Howe - 2019 - Journal of Animal Ethics 9 (2):137.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Genealogical Relationships Do Not Support Indirect Speciesism.Josh Mund - 2019 - Journal of Animal Ethics 9 (2):143.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. Stopping Hard, for a Girl [Part One].Paul Bali - unknown
    contents -/- 1. can sexual decadence lead to extinction? 2. sex plugs a man into a feminine system 3. stopping hard, for a girl 4. Venus in Furs 5. a Hero saves Helen from blame - so condescends .
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. A Conceptual Approach for a Quantitative Economic Analysis of Farmers’ Decision-Making Regarding Animal Welfare.É Gocsik, H. W. Saatkamp, C. C. de Lauwere & A. G. J. M. Oude Lansink - 2014 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 27 (2):287-308.
    Decisions related to animal welfare standards depend on farmer’s multiple goals and values and are constrained by a wide range of external and internal forces. The aim of this paper is twofold, i.e., to develop a theoretical framework for farmers’ AW decisions that incorporates farmers’ goals, use and non-use values and to present an approach to empirically implement the theoretical framework. The farmer as a head of the farm household makes choices regarding production to maximize the utility of the household. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  26. Mary Midgley: An Introduction.Gregory McElwain - 2020 - London, UK: Bloomsbury Academic Press.
    For over 40 years, Mary Midgley made a forceful case for the relevance and importance of philosophy. With characteristic wit and wisdom, she drew special attention to the ways in which our thought influences our everyday lives. Her wide-ranging explorations of human nature and the self; our connections with animals and the natural world; and the complexities of morality, gender, science, and religion all contributed to her reputation as one of the most expansive and compelling moral philosophers of the twentieth (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. Individuals in the Wild.Bob Fischer - 2018 - Animal Sentience 23 (8).
    If many wild animals have net negative lives, then we have to consider how likely it is that the good for animals, considered as individuals, aligns with the good for species, or the climate, or the preservation of wild spaces.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. Distinction morale entre animaux sauvages et non-sauvages : Une critique de l’approche contextuelle de Clare Palmer.Sophia Rousseau-Mermans - 2016 - Ithaque 18:73-90.
    Dans deux articles récents, Clare Palmer défend la portée morale de la distinction entre animaux non humains domestiqués et animaux non humains sauvages suivant une approche « contextuelle ». Suivant cette approche, Palmer considère que les liens historiques qui unissent les animaux domestiqués aux êtres humains, à l’origine causale d’un état de dépendance et de vulnérabilité subi par les premiers, génèrent des obligations morales spéciales à leur égard non partagées par les animaux non-domestiqués. Considérant tout d'abord les limites de la (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. Climate Change, Autonomy of Nature, and Animal Suffering: Rethinking Borders between Animal Ethics and Environmental Ethics.R.-M. Sophia Rousseau-Mermans Sophia - 2018 - Les ateliers de l'éthique/The Ethics Forum 13 (1):4-16.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. Une théorie morale peut-elle être cognitivement trop exigeante?Nicolas Delon - 2015 - Implications Philosophiques.
    Starting from the typical case of utilitarianism, I distinguish three ways a moral theory may be deemed (over-)demanding: practical, epistemic, and cognitive. I focus on the latter, whose specific nature has been overlooked. Taking animal ethics as a case study, I argue that knowledge of human cognition is critical to spelling out moral theories (including their implications) that are accessible and acceptable to the greatest number of agents. In a nutshell: knowing more about our cognitive apparatus with a view to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. “Like One Who is Bringing His Own Hide to Market”: Marx, Irigaray, Derrida and Animal Commodification.Dinesh Joseph Wadiwel - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (2):65-82.
    This paper explores the commodification of animals, beginning with Marx’s description of how value arises within a system of exchange. Drawing from Irigaray, I observe that value in animals is both arrived at through the use value of the animal as a commodity for human consumption and as a form of currency which serves a function in reproducing the value of the “human” itself. Extending this further, I reflect on Derrida’s discussion of the metaphor as a way to understand the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. On Asking the Right Questions: An Interview with Vinciane Despret.Jeffrey Bussolini, Matthew Chrulew & Brett Buchanan - 2015 - Angelaki 20 (2):165-178.
    :This interview ranges across a number of topics relevant to Vinciane Despret's thought: the history and philosophy of ethology; animal culture; stories and storytelling; feminism; philosophical anthropology; animal studies; collaborative research; and animals in laboratories, in the field, on farms, and in books. It touches on thinkers and artists including Isabelle Stengers, Donna Haraway, Bruno Latour, Jacques Derrida, Gilles Deleuze, and Luc Petton.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  33. Animal Abecedary: “O for Œuvres” and “Q for Queer”.Brett Buchanan & Vinciane Despret - 2015 - Angelaki 20 (2):137-147.
    :In 2012, Despret published an abecedary entitled What Would Animals Say, If … They Were Asked the Right Questions? Covering a range of subjects, themes, authors, and animals, Despret carefully and playfully demonstrates the ability of animals to continuously force us to re-examine our most basic and arrived at human conceptions, understandings, and biases. Excerpted from this book are two chapters on art and gender. “O for Œuvres” looks at the question of animal agency and intentionality in the making of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. ZOOMIMESIS: Animal Inspiration.Jeffrey Bussolini & Roberto Marchesini - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (1):175-197.
    The meticulous observation and imitation of animals lies deeply within human culture and identity. Zoomimesis refers to this performative animal mimicry and to how animal references and interaction are woven into the conception of the human. Zoomimesis has an anthropodecentering effect that places animal–human interactions in horizontal rather than hierarchical relation. Music, dance, and clothing show influence from animal behaviors. Many types of body art and body modification are inspired by animals. Animal movements and behaviors become an extension of the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. Food, Animals, and the Environment: An Ethical Approach.Christopher Schlottmann & Jeff Sebo - 2018 - New York: Routledge.
    Food, Animals, and the Environment: An Ethical Approach examines some of the main impacts that agriculture has on humans, nonhumans, and the environment, as well as some of the main questions that these impacts raise for the ethics of food production, consumption, and activism. Agriculture is having a lasting effect on this planet. Some forms of agriculture are especially harmful. For example, industrial animal agriculture kills 100+ billion animals per year; consumes vast amounts of land, water, and energy; and produces (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  36. Earth as a Life-Raft and Ethics as the Raft’s Axe.Evangelos D. Protopapadakis - 2016 - In Irina Deretić & Stefan Lorenz Sorgner (eds.), From Humanism to Meta-, Post- and Transhumanism? Frankfurt am Main, Berlin, Bern, Bruxelles, New York, Oxford, Wien: pp. 227-242.
    A common metaphor on our planet portrays it as a rescue boat for life that travels in an endless see of cosmic darkness. If this metaphor is to be considered a precise one, this would mean that the earth is the only chance for life to survive the journey – at least as far as animal life is concerned. Apart from this, however, the metaphor implies that our planet is also very fragile, and that its carrying capacity is limited. Now, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. Redefending Nonhuman Justice in Complex Animal Communities: A Response to Jacobs.C. E. Abbate - 2018 - Journal of Animal Ethics 8 (2):159.
    In response to my argument against Aristotle’s claim that humans are more political than other animals, Edward Jacobs counters that the evidence I use from cognitive ethology and my application of evolutionary principles fail to demonstrate that other animals are as political as humans. Jacobs furthermore suggests that humans are more political than other animals by pointing to the political variation in human communities. In this article, I defend my use of evolutionary principles and my interpretation of anecdotes from cognitive (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  38. Animals in Biblical and Ancient Near Eastern Law: Tort and Ethical Laws.Idan Breier - 2018 - Journal of Animal Ethics 8 (2):166.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. “Aristotle and the Zoon Politkon”: A Response to Abbate.Edward Jacobs - 2018 - Journal of Animal Ethics 8 (2):150.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40. The Future of SeaWorld.Katie Javanaud, Harshmeena Sanghani & Grace C. Young - 2018 - Journal of Animal Ethics 8 (2):133.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. A Remarkable Convergence.Andrew Linzey & Clair Linzey - 2018 - Journal of Animal Ethics 8 (2):v.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. Training Young Killers: How Butcher Education Might Be Damaging Young People.Maša Blaznik - 2018 - Journal of Animal Ethics 8 (2):199.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. Cat Wars: The Devastating Consequences of a Dangerous Book.Joan E. Schaffner - 2018 - Journal of Animal Ethics 8 (2):236.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44. The Case for Ethical Fur: Is In Vitro Fur a Viable Alternative?Rivers Gambrell, Katie Javanaud & Harshmeena Sanghani - 2018 - Journal of Animal Ethics 8 (2):229.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45. Hermeneutical Injustice and Animal Ethics: Can Nonhuman Animals Suffer From Hermeneutical Injustice?Paul-Mikhail Podosky - 2018 - Journal of Animal Ethics 8 (2):216.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46. A Case for Recognizing the Rights of Animals as Workers.Rosemary Shaw - 2018 - Journal of Animal Ethics 8 (2):182.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47. Should We Help Wild Animals Suffering Negative Impacts From Climate Change?Clare Alexandra Palmer - 2018 - In Svenja Springer & Herwig Grimm (eds.), Professionals in food chains. Wageningen Academic Publishers. pp. 35-40.
    Should we help wild animals suffering negative impacts from anthropogenic climate change? It follows from diverse ethical positions that we should, although this idea troubles defenders of wildness value. One already existing climate threat to wild animals, especially in the Arctic, is the disruption of food chains. I take polar bears as my example here: Should we help starving polar bears? If so, how? A recent scientific paper suggests that as bears’ food access worsens due to a changing climate, we (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. Meeting the Patient’s Interest in Veterinary Clinics. Ethical Dimensions of the 21st Century Animal Patient.Kerstin Weich & Herwig Grimm - 2018 - Food Ethics 1 (3):259-272.
    The main objective of this paper is to introduce the concept of the “animal patient” to academic debates on animal ethics, veterinary ethics and medical ethics. This move reflects the prioritization of the animal patient in the veterinary profession’s own current ethical self-conception. Our paper contributes to the state of research by analysing the conceptual prerequisites for the constitution and understanding of animals as patients through the lens of two concepts fundamental to the medical field: health and disease. The first (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  49. Routledge Handbook of Animal Ethics.Bob Fischer (ed.) - 2019 - New York: Routledge.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. How Should One Live? An Introduction to Ethics and Moral Reasoning.Bradley Thames - 2018 - San Diego, CA, USA: Bridgepoint Education.
    This book provides an entry-level introduction to philosophical ethics, theories of moral reasoning, and selected issues in applied ethics. Chapter 1 describes the importance of philosophical approaches to ethical issues, the general dialectical form of moral reasoning, and the broad landscape of moral philosophy. Chapter 2 presents egoism and relativism as challenges to the presumed objectivity and unconditionality of morality. Chapters 3, 4 and 5 discuss utilitarianism, deontology, and virtue ethics, respectively. Each chapter begins with a general overview of the (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 4596