About this topic
Summary The topic of Animal Minds is a broad interdisciplinary area with contributions by philosophers, psychologists, behavioral biologists, neuroscientists, and anthropologists. Because the notion of "mind" predates science and because the scientific definition of "cognition" is itself contested, the exact range of capacities attributable to animals and capable of empirical investigation is also contested, but these capacities include general reasoning, reasoning in specific domains such as causal inference or social hierarchies, tool use, problem solving, communicative and proto-linguistic abilities, episodic and semantic memory, spatial navigation (including cognitive maps), metacognition, self-recognition and self-awareness, and various capacities related to social cognition such as "mind reading" or "theory of mind", imitation and emulation.  Questions about the existence, distribution and forms of animal consciousness, along with feelings, emotions and affective states such as pain, are also debated in this area. All of these topics also bear on the moral status of animals, both as subjects of moral concern and possibly as moral agents themselves. Comparative approaches to animal mind and cognition have contributed importantly to debates about evolution.
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  1. A Description of the Cerebral Convolutions of the Chimpanzee Known as "Sally"; with Notes on the Convolutions of Other Chimpanzees and of Two Orangs.No Authorship Indicated - 1895 - Psychological Review 2 (2):195-196.
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  2. Abnormal Animal Behavior and Conflict.F. W. Finger - 1945 - Psychological Review 52 (4):230-233.
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  3. Mind in Animals, Tr. By A. Besant.Friedrich Carl C. Ludwig Büchner & Annie Besant - 1880
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  4. Ashburn's The Animal Mind. [REVIEW]S. O. Mast - 1908 - Journal of Philosophy 5 (17):467.
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  5. Olmes's Studies in Animal Behavior. [REVIEW]W. B. Pillsbury - 1918 - Journal of Philosophy 15 (8):222.
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  6. Animals Don't Mind. [REVIEW]Martin Cohen - 2010 - The Philosopher 98 (1).
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  7. Beyond Assimilationism and Differentialism. Comment on Glock.Keil Geert - 2012 - In Julian Nida-Rümelin Elif Özmen (ed.), Welt der Gründe. pp. 914-922.
    In a number of articles, Hans-Johann Glock has argued against the »lingualist« view that higher mental capacities are a prerogative of language-users. He has defended the »assimilationist« claim that the mental capacities of humans and of non-human animals differ only in degree. In the paper under discussion, Glock argues that animals are capable of acting for reasons, provided that reasons are construed along the lines of the new »objectivist« theory of practical reasons.
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  8. Less is Different: Discontinuity Between Animal and Human Consciousness. Animal Consciousness and Animal Ethics, Marcel Dol A.O. [REVIEW]S. E. E. M. Lijmbach - unknown
  9. Animal Subjectivity : A Study Into Philosophy and Theory of Animal Experience.S. Lijmbach - unknown
    For many people, laypeople as well as animal scientists and philosophers, animal welfare involves animal feelings. Scientifically, however, animal feelings are problematic. In the concluding remarks of a conference about the welfare of domestic animals in 1994, for example, two questions for further research were proposed: What is the nature of feelings? and Why is it not possible to measure the occurrence of feelings in animals directly? This book intends to give a philosophical and scientific-theoretical answer to both questions. The (...)
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  10. Sabine Eggers Reviews The Metaphysics of Apes: Negotiating the Animal-Human Boundary.R. Corbey - 2006 - Journal of Biosocial Science 38 (6):845.
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  11. Selbstbewusstsein bei Tieren: begriffliche und methodologische Probleme.Florian L. Wüstholz - 2013 - Studia Philosophica 72:87-101.
    Are nonhuman non-linguistic animals self-conscious? And how is it possible to find out whether they are or not? This question raises two interrelated problems: the conceptual problem and the methodological problem. In order to approach an answer, it is first and foremost necessary to establish criteria for self-consciousness by considering the phenomenon and the abilities connected with it. Subsequently, one can survey the experimental paradigms. Do the experiments really show that the identified ability has to be used to successfully master (...)
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  12. The Farmer, the Hunter, and the Census Taker: Three Distinct Views of Animal Behavior.Mark E. Borrello - 2010 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 32 (1).
  13. Apes, Men and Morons.R. M. W. Travers - 1938 - The Eugenics Review 30 (2):143.
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  14. Encounters with Animal Minds.Barbara Smuts - 2001 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 8 (5-7):5-7.
    In this article I draw on personal experience to explore the kinds of relationships that can develop between human and nonhuman animals. The first part of the article describes my encounters with wild baboons, whom I studied in East Africa over the course of many years. The baboons treated me as a social being, and to gain their trust I had to learn the troop's social conventions and behave in accordance with them. This process gave me a feeling for what (...)
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  15. Men and Apes.Herbert Brewer - 1966 - The Eugenics Review 58 (3):162.
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  16. Chimpanzees Are Always New to Me.Toshisada Nishida - 1993 - In Peter Singer & Paola Cavalieri (eds.), The Great Ape Project. St. Martin's Griffin. pp. 24--27.
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  17. 2 Life and Cognition.Margaret Boden - 2001 - In João Branquinho (ed.), The Foundations of Cognitive Science. Oxford: Clarendon Press. pp. 11.
  18. Animal Behavior in Four Components.B. W. Mel - 1995 - In H. Roitblat & Jean-Arcady Meyer (eds.), Comparative Approaches to Cognitive Science. MIT Press.
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  19. Comparing Cognition in Animals, and Researchers.Dario Maestripieri - 2001 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5 (10):452-453.
  20. Spontaneous Number Discrimination of Multi-Format Auditory Stimuli in Cotton-Top Tamarins.Marc D. Hauser, Stanislas Dehaene, Ghislaine Dehaene-Lambertz & Andrea L. Patalano - 2002 - Cognition 86 (2):B23-B32.
  21. Comprehension of Sentences by Bottlenosed Dolphins.Louis M. Herman, Douglas G. Richards & James P. Wolz - 1984 - Cognition 16 (2):129-219.
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  22. Signing Behavior in Apes: A Critical Review.Mark S. Seidenberg & Laura A. Petitto - 1979 - Cognition 7 (2):177-215.
  23. Representations in Animal Cognition: An Introduction.C. R. Gallistel - 1990 - Cognition 37 (1-2):1-22.
  24. On Thoughts Without Words.N. Goodman - 1982 - Cognition 12 (2):211-217.
  25. Levels of Causal Understanding in Chimpanzees and Children.David Premack & Ann James Premack - 1994 - Cognition 50 (1-3):347-362.
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  26. Artifactual Kinds and Functional Design Features: What a Primate Understands Without Language.Marc D. Hauser - 1997 - Cognition 64 (3):285-308.
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  27. Segmentation of the Speech Stream in a Non-Human Primate: Statistical Learning in Cotton-Top Tamarins.Marc D. Hauser, Elissa L. Newport & Richard N. Aslin - 2001 - Cognition 78 (3):B53-B64.
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  28. The Gestural Abilities of Apes.Suzanne Chevalier-Skolnikoff - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (3):382-383.
  29. Animal Well-Being: There Are Many Paths to Enlightenment.Evalyn F. Segal - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):36-37.
  30. Animals, Science, and Morality.R. G. Frey - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):22-22.
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  31. Animal Suffering, Critical Anthropomorphism, and Reproductive Rights.Gordon M. Burghardt - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):14-15.
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  32. The Significance of Seeking the Animal's Perspective.Arnold Arluke - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):13-14.
  33. Ethics and Animals.Peter Singer - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):45-48.
  34. Human Ethology: Methods and Limits.I. Eibl-Eibesfeldt - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):50-57.
  35. Classical Ethology: Concepts and Implications for Human Ethology.Glendon Schubert - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):44-46.
  36. On Human Ethology: Some Methodological Comments.Steven A. Peterson - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):43-44.
  37. “It Just Depends on What One Wants to Know”: Eibl-Eibesfeldt's Human Ethology.Joseph K. Kovach - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):40-42.
  38. The Ethology Behind Human Ethology.Jack P. Hailman - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):35-36.
  39. The Dangers of Analogy in Human Ethology.Burton Benedict - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):27.
  40. Cognitive Ethology Comes of Age.Michael Tomasello - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):168-169.
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  41. Monkeys Mind.Colin Allen - 1992 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 15 (1):147-147.
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  42. Avian Data on Aggression.R. J. Andrew - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (2):213-214.
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  43. Making the Best Use of Primate Tool Use?James R. Anderson - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):551-552.
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  44. Ethology: The Natural Model.Douglas A. Kramer & William T. McKinney - 1979 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (4):639-640.
  45. Is Human Cognition Adaptive?John R. Anderson - 1991 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (3):471-485.
  46. Motivational Systems: Fear or Defense? Pain or Recuperation?David B. Adams - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (2):301.
  47. Do Nonhuman Animals Commit Suicide?William J. Hamilton - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (2):278.
  48. Defense Motivational System: Issues of Emotion, Reinforcement, and Neural Structure.David Adams - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (4):675.
  49. Some Thoughts on the Proper Foundations for the Study of Cognition in Animals.Lynn Nadel - 1982 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (3):383.
  50. The Ethology of Neuroethology.Hubert Markl - 1984 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (3):396.
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