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  1. Raymond Corbey's' The Metaphysics of Apes'.Pieter Adriaens - 2007 - Algemeen Nederlands Tijdschrift voor Wijsbegeerte 99 (4):310-312.
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  2. Self-Recognition.James R. Anderson, Gordon G. Gallup & Steven M. Platek - 2011 - In Shaun Gallagher (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the Self. Oxford University Press.
    This article focuses on mirror self-recognition, the ability to recognize one's own image in a mirror. It presents the result of the first experiment on mirror self-recognition which showed that chimpanzees are able to learn that the chimps they see in the mirror are not other chimps, but themselves, as evidenced by self-directed behaviour. It reviews evidence for neural network for self-recognition and self-other differentiation and cites evidence that frontal cortex and cortical midline structures are implicated in self-recognition tasks. It (...)
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  3. The First Step in the Case for Great Ape Equality: The Argument for Other Minds.Kristin Andrews - unknown
    A defense of equality for great apes must begin with an understanding of the opposition and an acknowledgement of the most basic point of disagreement. For great apes to gain status as persons in our community, we must begin by determining what the multitude of different definitions of "person" have in common. Finding that great apes fulfill the requirements of any one specific theory of personhood is insufficient, for these theories are highly controversial, and a critique of the theory will (...)
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  4. The Animal Mind: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Animal Cognition.Kristin Andrews - 2014 - Routledge.
    The study of animal cognition raises profound questions about the minds of animals and philosophy of mind itself. Aristotle argued that humans are the only animal to laugh, but in recent experiments rats have also been shown to laugh. In other experiments, dogs have been shown to respond appropriately to over two hundred words in human language. In this introduction to the philosophy of animal minds Kristin Andrews introduces and assesses the essential topics, problems and debates as they cut across (...)
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  5. The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Animal Minds.Kristin Andrews & Jacob Beck (eds.) - forthcoming - Routledge.
    While philosophers have been interested in animals since ancient times, in the last few decades the subject of animal minds has emerged as a major topic in philosophy. The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Animal Minds is an outstanding reference source to the key topics, problems and debates in this exciting subject and is the first collection of its kind. Comprising nearly fifty chapters by a team of international contributors, the Handbook is divided into eight parts: -/- • Mental representation (...)
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  6. The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Animal Minds.Kristin Andrews & Jacob Beck (eds.) - 2017 - Routledge.
    While philosophers have been interested in animals since ancient times, in the last few decades the subject of animal minds has emerged as a major topic in philosophy. _The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Animal Minds_ is an outstanding reference source to the key topics, problems and debates in this exciting subject and is the first collection of its kind. Comprising nearly fifty chapters by a team of international contributors, the _Handbook_ is divided into eight parts: Mental representation Reasoning and (...)
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  7. The Failure of Theories of Personhood.Tom L. Beauchamp - 1999 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 9 (4):309-324.
    : The belief persists in philosophy, religion, science, and popular culture that some special cognitive property of persons like self-consciousness confers a unique moral standing. However, no set of cognitive properties confers moral standing, and metaphysical personhood is not sufficient for either moral personhood or moral standing. Cognitive theories all fail to capture the depth of commitments embedded in using the language of "person." It is more assumed than demonstrated in these theories that nonhuman animals lack a relevant form of (...)
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  8. Consciousness and Self in Animals: Some Reflections.Marc Bekoff - 2003 - Zygon 38 (2):229-245.
    In this essay I argue that many nonhuman animal beings are conscious and have some sense of self. Rather than ask whether they are conscious, I adopt an evolutionary perspective and ask why consciousness and a sense of self evolved---what are they good for? Comparative studies of animal cognition, ethological investigations that explore what it is like to be a certain animal, are useful for answering this question. Charles Darwin argued that the differences in cognitive abilities and emotions among animals (...)
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  9. Do Dolphins Know Their Own Minds?Derek Browne - 2004 - Biology and Philosophy 19 (4):633-53.
    Knowledge of one's own states of mind is one of the varieties of self-knowledge. Do any nonhuman animals have the capacity for this variety of self-knowledge? The question is open to empirical inquiry, which is most often conducted with primate subjects. Research with a bottlenose dolphin gives some evidence for the capacity in a nonprimate taxon. I describe the research and evaluate the metacognitive interpretation of the dolphin's behaviour. The research exhibits some of the difficulties attached to the task of (...)
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  10. Specifically Human? The Limited Conception of Self-Consciousness in Theories of Reflective Endorsement.Irene Bucelli - 2016 - In .
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  11. Machiavellian Intelligence: Social Expertise and the Evolution of Intellect in Monkeys, Apes, and Humans.R. W. Byrne & Andrew Whiten (eds.) - 1988 - Oxford University Press.
    This book presents an alternative to conventional ideas about the evolution of the human intellect.
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  12. Meta-Cognition in Animals: A Skeptical Look.Peter Carruthers - 2007 - Mind and Language 22 (1):58–89.
    This paper examines the recent literature on meta-cognitive processes in non-human animals, arguing that in each case the data admit of a simpler, purely first-order, explanation. The topics discussed include the alleged monitoring of states of certainty and uncertainty, the capacity to know whether or not one has perceived something, and the capacity to know whether or not the information needed to solve some problem is stored in memory. The first-order explanations advanced all assume that beliefs and desires come in (...)
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  13. A Declaration of Great Apes.Paola Cavalieri & Peter Singer - 1993 - In Peter Singer & Paola Cavalieri (eds.), The Great Ape Project. St. Martin's Griffin. pp. 4--7.
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  14. Why Animals Are Persons.Tony Cheng - 2016 - Animal Sentience 1 (10):5-6.
    Rowlands’s case for attributing personhood to lower animals is ultimately convincing, but along the way he fails to highlight several distinctions that are crucial for his argument: Personhood vs. personal identity; the first person vs. its mental episodes; and pre- reflective awareness in general vs. one specific case of it.
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  15. Did Consciousness Evolve From Self-Paced Probing of the Environment, and Not From Reflexes?Rodney M. J. Cotterill - 2000 - Brain and Mind 1 (2):283-298.
    It is suggested that the anatomical structures whichmediate consciousness evolved as decisiveembellishments to a (non-conscious) design strategypresent even in the simplest monocellular organisms.Consciousness is thus not the pinnacle of ahierarchy whose base is the primitive reflex, becausereflexes require a nervous system, which the monocelldoes not possess. By postulating that consciousness isintimately connected to self-paced probing of theenvironment, also prominent in prokaryotic behavior,one can make mammalian neuroanatomy amenable todramatically simple rationalization.
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  16. Self-Consciousness in Chimps and Pigeons.Lawrence H. Davis - 1989 - Philosophical Psychology 2 (3):249-59.
    Chimpanzee behaviour with mirrors makes it plausible that they can recognise themselves as themselves in mirrors, and so have a 'self-concept'. I defend this claim, and argue that roughly similar behaviour in pigeons, as reported, does not in fact make it equally plausible that they also have this mental capacity. But for all that it is genuine, chimpanzee self-consciousness may differ significantly from ours. I describe one possibility I believe consistent with the data, even if not very plausible: that the (...)
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  17. Self-Awareness in Animals.David DeGrazia - 2009 - In Robert W. Lurz (ed.), The Philosophy of Animal Minds. Cambridge University Press. pp. 201--217.
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  18. The Pinnacle of Life: Consciousness and Self-Awareness in Humans and Animals.Derek A. Denton - 1993 - Harpersanfrancisco.
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  19. Mind the Gap: Or Why Humans Aren't Just Great Apes.R. I. M. Dunbar - 2008 - Proceedings of the British Academy 154:403-423.
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  20. Animal Consciousness and Human Self-Consciousness.John C. Eccles - 1982 - Experientia 38:1384-91.
  21. "Self-Awareness" in the Pigeon.Robert Epstein, R. P. Lanza & B. F. Skinner - 1981 - Science 212 (4495):695-96.
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  22. The Human Face of Early Modern England.Erica Fudge - 2011 - Angelaki 16 (1):97 - 110.
    This essay traces out the context that allowed numerous early modern thinkers to deny that animals had faces. Using early- to mid-seventeenth-century writing by, among others, John Milton, John Bulwer and Ben Jonson, it shows that faces were understood to be sites of meaning, and were thus, like gestural language and the capacity to perform a dance, possessed by humans alone. Animals, this discourse argued, have no ability to communicate meaningfully because they have no bodily control, and as such they (...)
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  23. The Mirror Test.Gordon G. Gallup Jr, James R. Anderson & Daniel J. Shillito - 2002 - In Marc Bekoff, Colin Allen & Gordon M. Burghardt (eds.), The Cognitive Animal: Empirical and Theoretical Perspectives on Animal Cognition. MIT Press.
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  24. Self-Recognition: Research Strategies and Experimental Design.G. G. Gallup - 1994 - In S. T. Parker, R. Mitchell & M. L. Boccia (eds.), Self-Awareness in Animals and Humans: Developmental Perspectives. Cambridge University Press.
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  25. Toward a Comparative Psychology of Self-Awareness: Species Limitations and Cognitive Consequences.G. G. Gallup - 1991 - In G. Goethals & J. Strauss (eds.), The Self: An Interdisciplinary Perspective. Springer Verlag.
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  26. Self-Awareness.G. G. Gallup - 1987 - In G. Mitchell (ed.), Comparative Primate Biology, Volume 2. Liss.
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  27. Self-Awareness and the Emergence of Mind in Primates.G. G. Gallup - 1982 - American Journal of Primatology 2:237-48.
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  28. Self-Recognition in Chimpanzees and Man: A Developmental and Comparative Perspective.G. G. Gallup - 1979 - In M. Lewis & M. Rosenblum (eds.), Genesis of Behavior, Volume 2. Plenum Press. pp. 107–126.
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  29. Self-Recognition in Primates: A Comparative Approach to the Bidirectionalproperties of Consciousness.G. G. Gallup - 1977 - American Psychologist 32:329-38.
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  30. Toward an Operational Definition of Self-Awareness.G. G. Gallup - 1975 - In R. Tuttle (ed.), Socioecology and the Psychology of Primates. Mouton.
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  31. Chimpanzees: Self-Recognition.G. G. Gallup - 1970 - Science 167:86-87.
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  32. The Consciousness Paradox: Consciousness, Concepts, and Higher-Order Thoughts.Rocco J. Gennaro - 2012 - MIT Press.
    Consciousness is arguably the most important area within contemporary philosophy of mind and perhaps the most puzzling aspect of the world. Despite an explosion of research from philosophers, psychologists, and scientists, attempts to explain consciousness in neurophysiological, or even cognitive, terms are often met with great resistance. In The Consciousness Paradox, Rocco Gennaro aims to solve an underlying paradox, namely, how it is possible to hold a number of seemingly inconsistent views, including higher-order thought (HOT) theory, conceptualism, infant and animal (...)
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  33. Animals, Consciousness, and I-Thoughts.Rocco J. Gennaro - 2009 - In Robert W. Lurz (ed.), The Philosophy of Animal Minds. Cambridge University Press. pp. 184--200.
    I argue that recent developments in animal cognition support the conclusion that HOT theory is consistent with animal consciousness. There seems to be growing evidence that many animals are indeed capable of having I-thoughts, including episodic memory, as well as have the ability to understand the mental states of others.
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  34. Man-Apes of Eastern Australia. Part 1.R. Gilroy - 1991 - Nexus 2 (5):25-28.
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  35. The Self: An Interdisciplinary Perspective.G. Goethals & J. Strauss (eds.) - 1991 - Springer Verlag.
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  36. Ostensive Behavior in Great Apes: The Role of Eye Contact.Juan-Carlos Gomez - 1996 - In A. Russon, Kim A. Bard & S. Parkers (eds.), Reaching Into Thought: The Minds of the Great Apes. Cambridge University Press. pp. 131--151.
  37. Thinking About Animal Thoughts.Donald R. Griffin - 1983 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6 (3):364.
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  38. World Poverty, Animal Minds and the Ethics of Veterinary Expenditure.John Hadley & Siobhan O'Sullivan - 2009 - Environmental Values 18 (3):361-378.
    In this paper we make an argument for limiting veterinary expenditure on companion animals. The argument combines two principles: the obligation to give and the self-consciousness requirement. In line with the former, we ought to give money to organisations helping to alleviate preventable suffering and death in developing countries; the latter states that it is only intrinsically wrong to painlessly kill an individual that is self-conscious. Combined, the two principles inform an argument along the following lines: rather than spending inordinate (...)
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  39. Descartes on Animals.Peter Harrison - 1992 - Philosophical Quarterly 42 (167):219-227.
    Did Descartes deny that animals can feel? While it has generally been assumed that he did, there has been some confusion over the fact that Descartes concedes to animals both sensations and passions'. John Cottingham, for example, has argued that while Descartes did insist that animals were automata, denying them thought and "self"-consciousness, none of these assertions entail the conclusion that animals do not feel. This paper examines both Cottingham's arguments and the relevant sections of Descartes' writings, concluding that Descartes (...)
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  40. Self-Awareness and Self-Knowledge in Humans, Apes, and Monkeys.Daniel Hart & M. P. Karmel - 1996 - In A. Russon, Kim A. Bard & S. Parkers (eds.), Reaching Into Thought: The Minds of the Great Apes. Cambridge University Press.
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  41. Knot Tying in Great Apes: Etho-Ethnology of an Unusual Tool Behavior.C. Herzfeld - 2005 - Social Science Information 44 (4):621-653.
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  42. Reflections on Self-Recognition in Primates.Cecilia M. Heyes - 1994 - Animal Behaviour 47:909-19.
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  43. Rational Animals?Susan L. Hurley & Matthew Nudds (eds.) - 2006 - Oxford University Press.
    To what extent can animal behaviour be described as rational? What does it even mean to describe behaviour as rational? -/- This book focuses on one of the major debates in science today - how closely does mental processing in animals resemble mental processing in humans. It addresses the question of whether and to what extent non-human animals are rational, that is, whether any animal behaviour can be regarded as the result of a rational thought processes. It does this with (...)
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  44. Self-Awareness in Bonobos and Chimpanzees: A Comparative Perspective.C. W. Hyatt & W. Hopkins - 1994 - In S. T. Parker, R. Mitchell & M. L. Boccia (eds.), Self-Awareness in Animals and Humans: Developmental Perspectives. Cambridge University Press.
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  45. Animal Consciousness In Hegel's Philosophy Of Subjective Spirit.Heikki Ikäheimo - 2010 - Hegel-Jahrbuch 12:180-185.
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  46. Of Apes and Ancestors: Evolution, Christianity and the Oxford Debate. [REVIEW]Frank James - 2011 - British Journal for the History of Science 44 (2):298-300.
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  47. Great Apes and the Human Resistance to Equality.Dale Jamieson - 1993 - In Peter Singer & Paola Cavalieri (eds.), The Great Ape Project. St. Martin's Griffin. pp. 223--229.
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  48. We Should Prohibit the Use of Chimpanzees and Other Great Apes in Biomedical.Jean Kazez - 2013 - In Arthur L. Caplan & Robert Arp (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Bioethics. Wiley. pp. 25--271.
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  49. Did Consciousness of Self Play a Part in the Behavior of This Monkey?Edward J. Kempf - 1916 - Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 13 (15):410-412.
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  50. Are Apes and Elephants Persons?Barbara J. King - 2011 - In J. Wentzel Van Huyssteen & Erik P. Wiebe (eds.), In Search of Self: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Personhood. William B. Eerdmans Pub. Co.. pp. 70.
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