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  1. Introduction: The Evidence for Anosognosia.B. Baars - 1992 - Consciousness and Cognition 1 (2):148-151.
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  2. Unrealistic Representations of “the Self”: A Cognitive Neuroscience Assessment of Anosognosia for Memory Deficit.Manuela Berlingeri, Alessandra Ravasio, Silvia Cranna, Stefania Basilico, Maurizio Sberna, Gabriella Bottini & Eraldo Paulesu - 2015 - Consciousness and Cognition 37:160-177.
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  3. Anosognosia Related to Hemiplegia and Hemianopia.E. Bisiach & G. Geminiani - 1991 - In George P. Prigatano & Daniel L. Schacter (eds.), Awareness of Deficits After Brain Injury. Oxford University Press.
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  4. Types of Body Representation and the Sense of Embodiment.Glenn Carruthers - 2008 - Consciousness and Cognition 17 (1302):1316.
    The sense of embodiment is vital for self recognition. An examination of anosognosia for hemiplegia—the inability to recognise that one is paralysed down one side of one’s body—suggests the existence of ‘online’ and ‘offline’ representations of the body. Online representations of the body are representations of the body as it is currently, are newly constructed moment by moment and are directly “plugged into” current perception of the body. In contrast, offline representations of the body are representations of what the body (...)
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  5. Developing Awareness About Awareness in Early-Stage Dementia: The Role of Psychosocial Factors.Linda Clare - 2002 - Dementia 1 (3):295-312.
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  6. Differences in Awareness of Neuropsychological Deficits Among Three Patient Populations.D. Ashley Cohen - manuscript
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  7. Anosognosia and the Two-Factor Theory of Delusions.Martin Davies, Anne Aimola Davies & Max Coltheart - 2005 - Mind and Language 20 (2):241-57.
    Anosognosia is literally ‘unawareness of or failure to acknowledge one’s hemi- plegia or other disability’ (OED). Etymology would suggest the meaning ‘lack of knowledge of disease’ so that anosognosia would include any denial of impairment, such as denial of blindness (Anton’s syndrome). But Babinski, who introduced the term in 1914, applied it only to patients with hemiplegia who fail to acknowledge their paralysis. Most commonly, this is failure to acknowledge paralysis of the left side of the body following damage to (...)
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  8. Hysteria: The Reverse of Anosognosia.Frédérique De Vignemont - unknown
    Hysteria has been the subject of controversy for many years, with theorists arguing about whether it is best explained by a hidden organic cause or by malingering and deception. However, it has been shown that hysterical paralysis cannot be explained in any of these terms. With the recent development of cognitive psychiatry, one may understand psychiatric and organic delusions within the same conceptual framework. Here I contrast hysterical conversion with anosognosia. They are indeed remarkably similar, though the content of their (...)
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  9. The Development of Awareness and the Use of Compensatory Strategies for Cognitive Deficits.Diane Dirette - 2002 - Brain Injury 16 (10):861-871.
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  10. A Review of Awareness Interventions in Brain Injury Rehabilitation. [REVIEW]J. M. Fleming & T. Ownsworth - 2006 - Neuropsychological Rehabilitation 16 (4):474-500.
  11. The Virtual Bodily Self: Mentalisation of the Body as Revealed in Anosognosia for Hemiplegia.Aikaterini Fotopoulou - 2015 - Consciousness and Cognition 33:500-510.
  12. Theoretical Reflections on Awareness, Monitoring, and Self in Relation on Anosognosia.David Galin - 1992 - Consciousness and Cognition 1 (2):152-62.
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  13. The Physiology of Motor Delusions in Anosognosia for Hemiplegia: Implications for Current Models of Motor Awareness.Martina Gandola, Gabriella Bottini, Laura Zapparoli, Paola Invernizzi, Margherita Verardi, Roberto Sterzi, Ignazio Santilli, Maurizio Sberna & Eraldo Paulesu - 2014 - Consciousness and Cognition 24:98-112.
  14. Self-Awareness and Memory Deficits in Sub-Acute Traumatic Brain Injury.Shelley Marie Gremley - unknown
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  15. Awareness and Knowing: Implications for Rehabilitation.Peter W. Halligan - 2006 - Neuropsychological Rehabilitation 16 (4):456-473.
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  16. Executive Function and Self-Awareness of "Real-World" Behavior and Attention Deficits Following Traumatic Brain Injury.Tessa Hart, John Whyte, Junghoon Kim & Monica Vaccaro - 2005 - Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation. Special Issue 20 (4):333-347.
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  17. Anosognosia for Hemiplegia: A Confabulatory State.Kenneth Heilman - 2009 - In William Hirstein (ed.), Confabulation: Views From Neuroscience, Psychiatry, Psychology and Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
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  18. Anosognosia: Possible Neuropsychological Mechanisms.K. M. Hellman - 1991 - In G. P. Prigatono & Daniel L. Schacter (eds.), Awareness of Deficit After Brain Injury: Clinical and Theoretical Issues. Oxford University Press. pp. 53--62.
  19. Introduction: What is Confabulation?William Hirstein - 2009 - In Confabulation: Views From Neuroscience, Psychiatry, Psychology and Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
  20. Self-Awareness of Neuropsychological Deficits in Children and Adolescents with Epilepsy.Bradley J. Hufford - 2000 - Dissertation, Purdue University
  21. Unawareness of Deficits After Right Hemisphere Stroke: Double-Dissociations of Anosognosias.M. Jehkonen, J. Ahonen, P. Dastidar & J. Vilkki - 2000 - Acta Neurologica Scandinavica 102:378-384.
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  22. Reality Monitoring in Anosognosia for Hemiplegia.Paul M. Jenkinson, Nicola M. J. Edelstyn, Justine L. Drakeford & Simon J. Ellis - 2009 - Consciousness and Cognition 18 (2):458-470.
    Anosognosia for hemiplegia is a lack of awareness about paralysis following stroke. Recent explanations use a ‘forward model’ of movement to suggest that AHP patients fail to register discrepancies between internally- and externally-generated sensory information. We predicted that this failure would impair the ability to recall from memory whether information is internally- or externally-generated . Two experiments examined this prediction. Experiment 1 demonstrated that AHP patients exhibit a reality monitoring deficit for non-motor information , whilst hemiplegic controls without anosognosia perform (...)
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  23. Awareness of the Functioning of One's Own Limbs Mediated by the Insular Cortex?Hans-Otto Karnath, Bernhard Baier & Thomas Nägele - 2005 - Journal of Neuroscience 25 (31):7134-7138.
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  24. Anosognosia.Alfred W. Kaszniak - 2003 - In L. Nadel (ed.), Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Nature Publishing Group.
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  25. Anosognosia, Consciousness, and the Self.John F. Kihlstrom & Betsy A. Tobias - 1991 - In G. P. Prigatono & Daniel L. Schacter (eds.), Awareness of Deficit After Brain Injury: Clinical and Theoretical Issues. Oxford University Press. pp. 198--222.
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  26. Higher Order Thought and the Problem of Radical Confabulation.Timothy Lane & Caleb Liang - 2008 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 46 (1):69-98.
    Currently, one of the most influential theories of consciousness is Rosenthal's version of higher-order-thought (HOT). We argue that the HOT theory allows for two distinct interpretations: a one-component and a two-component view. We further argue that the two-component view is more consistent with his effort to promote HOT as an explanatory theory suitable for application to the empirical sciences. Unfortunately, the two-component view seems incapable of handling a group of counterexamples that we refer to as cases of radical confabulation. We (...)
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  27. Self-Awareness of Deficits in Parkinson Disease.Elizabeth Leritz, Chris Loftis, Greg Crucian, William J. Friedman & Dawn Bowers - 2004 - Clinical Neuropsychologist 18 (3):352-361.
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  28. Approaches to the Assessment of Awareness: Conceptual Issues.Ivana S. Marková & German E. Berrios - 2006 - Neuropsychological Rehabilitation 16 (4):439-455.
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  29. Anosognosia and the Two‐Factor Theory of Delusions.Anne Aimola Davies Martin Davies - 2005 - Mind and Language 20 (2):209-236.
    : Anosognosia , and especially anosognosia for hemiplegia, seems to involve a belief that counts as a delusion by the usual definitions. Existing theories of anosognosia for hemiplegia appeal to impaired feedback from the paralysed side of the body and to cognitive impairments. We show how cases of anosognosia for hemiplegia can be brought within the scope of a generic two‐factor theory about the aetiology of monothematic delusions of neuropsychological origin.
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  30. Evaluating Awareness: A Rating Scale and its Uses.Rebecca Martin-Scull & Robert Nilsen - 2002 - International Journal of Cognitive Technology 7 (1):31-37.
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  31. Unawareness of Deficits in Neuropsychological Syndromes.S. M. McGlynn & Daniel L. Schacter - 1989 - Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology 11:143-205.
  32. Awareness and Unawareness of Thought Disorder.John McGrath & Rebecca Allman - 2000 - Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry 34 (1):35-42.
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  33. Anosognosia in Alzheimer's Disease – The Petrified Self.Daniel C. Mograbi, Richard G. Brown & Robin G. Morris - 2009 - Consciousness and Cognition 18 (4):989-1003.
    This paper reviews the literature concerning the neural correlates of the self, the relationship between self and memory and the profile of memory impairments in Alzheimer’s disease and explores the relationship between the preservation of the self and anosognosia in this condition. It concludes that a potential explanation for anosognosia in AD is a lack of updating of personal information due to the memory impairments characteristic of this disease. We put forward the hypothesis that anosognosia is due in part to (...)
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  34. Anosognosia and the Unity of Consciousness.Drakon Nikolinakos - 2004 - Philosophical Studies 119 (3):315-342.
    There are researchers in cognitive science who use clinical and experimental evidence to draw some rather skeptical conclusions about a central feature of our conscious experience, its unity. They maintain that the examination of clinical phenomena reveals that human consciousness has a much more fragmentary character than the one we normally attribute to it. In the article, these claims are questioned by examining some of the clinical studies on the deficit of anosognosia. I try to show that these studies support (...)
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  35. The Study of Anosognosia.George P. Prigatano - 2010 - Oxford University Press USA.
    The study of anosognosia has witnessed an unprecedented increase in interest over the last 20 years. This has resulted in numerous empirical investigations as well as theoretical writings on the nature of human consciousness and how disorders of the brain may influence the person's subjective awareness of a disturbed neurological or neuropsychological function. This edited text summarizes many of the advances that have taken place in the field of anosognosia. It reviews research findings on anosognosia for hemiplegia following stroke, Anton's (...)
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  36. Anosognosia, Interests and Equal Moral Consideration.Constance Perry - 2009 - American Journal of Bioethics 9 (5):25-27.
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  37. Can Anosognosia Vindicate Traditionalism About Self-Deception?José Eduardo Porcher - 2015 - Epistemology and Philosophy of Science 44 (2):206-217.
    The traditional conception of self-deception takes it for an intrapersonal form of interpersonal deception. However, since the same subject is at the same time deceiver and deceived, this means attributing the agent a pair of contradictory beliefs. In the course of defending a deflationary conception of self-deception, Mele [1997] has challenged traditionalists to present convincing evidence that there are cases of self-deception in which what he calls the dual belief-requirement is satisfied. Levy [2009] has responded to this challenge affirming that (...)
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  38. Awareness of Deficits After Brain Injury.George P. Prigatano & Daniel L. Schacter (eds.) - 1991 - Oxford University Press.
    This volume provides, for the first time, multidisciplinary perspectives on the problem of awareness of deficits following brain injury.
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  39. Awareness of Deficit After Brain Injury: Clinical and Theoretical Issues.G. P. Prigatono & Daniel L. Schacter (eds.) - 1991 - Oxford University Press.
  40. Anosognosia in Parietal Lobe Syndrome.Vilayanur S. Ramachandran - 1995 - Consciousness and Cognition 4 (1):22-51.
    Patients with right parietal lesions often deny their paralysis , but do they have "tacit" knowledge of their paralysis? I devised three novel tests to explore this. First, the patients were given a choice between a bimanual task vs a unimanual one . They chose the former on 17 of 18 trials and, surprisingly, showed no frustration or learning despite repeated failed attempts. I conclude that they have no tacit knowledge of paralysis . Second, I used a "virtual reality box" (...)
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  41. Self Awareness and Personality Change in Dementia.K. P. Rankin, E. Baldwin, C. Pace-Savitsky, J. H. Kramer & B. L. Miller - 2005 - Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry 76 (5):632-639.
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  42. Block's Philosophical Anosognosia.G. Rey - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (2):266.
  43. Toward a Cognitive Neuropsychology of Awareness: Implicit Knowledge and Anosognosia.Daniel L. Schacter - 1990 - Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology 12:155-78.
  44. The Role of Personality and Coping Style in Relation to Awareness of Current Functioning in Early-Stage Dementia.A. Seiffer, Linda Clare & Rudolf Harvey - 2005 - Aging and Mental Health 9 (6):535-541.
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  45. On Anosognosia.Erwin Straus - 1967 - In Erwin W. Straus (ed.), Phenomenology of Will and Action. Pittsburgh: Duquesne University Press. pp. 103--25.
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  46. Implicit Awareness of Deficit in Anosognosia? An Emotion-Based Account of Denial of Deficit. Comment.Oliver H. Turnbull, Karen Jones & Judith Reed-Screen - 2002 - Neuro-Psychoanalysis 4 (1):69-86.
  47. Belief and Awareness: Reflections on a Case of Persistent Anosognosia.Annalena Venneri & Michael F. Shanks - 2004 - Neuropsychologia 42 (2):230-238.
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  48. Anosognosia and Denial of Illness.Edwin A. Weinstein - 1991 - In G. P. Prigatono & Daniel L. Schacter (eds.), Awareness of Deficit After Brain Injury: Clinical and Theoretical Issues. Oxford University Press. pp. 240--257.
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