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  1. Is There a God?: A Debate.Kenneth L. Pearce & Graham Oppy - forthcoming - Routledge.
    Bertrand Russell famously quipped that he didn't believe in God for the same reason that he didn't believe in a teapot in orbit between the earth and Mars: it is a bizarre assertion for which no evidence can be provided. Is belief in God really like belief in Russell's Teapot? Kenneth L. Pearce argues that God is no teapot. God is a real answer to the deepest question of all: why is there something rather than nothing? Graham Oppy argues that (...)
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  2. The Prospects for Debunking Non-Theistic Belief.Thaddeus Robinson - 2021 - Sophia 60 (1):83-89.
    According to The Debunking Argument, evidence from the cognitive science of religion suggests that it is epistemically inappropriate to persist in believing in the theistic God. In this paper, I focus on a reply to this argument according to which the evidence from cognitive science says nothing about the epistemic propriety of belief in the theistic God, since God may have chosen to create human beliefs in God by means of precisely the systems identified by cognitive scientists. I argue that (...)
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  3. Moral Motivation and the Evil-God Challenge.Luke Wilson - forthcoming - Religious Studies:1-14.
    The evil-god challenge holds that theism is highly symmetrical to the evil-god hypothesis and thus it is not more reasonable to accept one rather than the other. But, since it is not reasonable to accept the evil-god hypothesis, it is not reasonable to accept theism. This article will primarily focus on defending the challenge from two recent objections which hold that it follows from the nature of moral motivation that theism is intrinsically much more likely to be true than the (...)
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  4. The Modal Problem of Creatio Ex Nihilo.Pao-Shen Ho - 2020 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 88 (2):197-213.
    I first provide an interpretation of the doctrine of creatio ex nihilo based on the Fourth Lateran Council, according to which God creates from nothing if and only if God creates everything except God Himself. I then show that this doctrine entails the modal problem that it is both possible and not possible that there is nothing at all except God, or alternatively, that it is both necessary and not necessary that there is something else besides God. I proceed to (...)
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  5. God, existence, and fictional objects: the Case for Meinongian theism: John-Mark L. Miravalle. Bloomsbury Academic, 2018, 186 pp, $102.60.Tyron Goldschmidt - 2020 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 88 (1):133-136.
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  6. Editorial preface.R. L. Hall - 2020 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 88 (1):1-3.
  7. What’s Wrong with Theistic Evolution?William Hasker - 2018 - Philosophia Christi 20 (2):581-590.
  8. The Common Consent Argument for the Existence of Nature Spirits.Tiddy Smith - 2020 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 98 (2):334-348.
    The traditional common consent argument for the existence of God has largely been abandoned—and rightly so. In this paper, I attempt to salvage the strongest version of the argument. Surprisingly,...
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  9. Do Logic and Religion Mix?James Collin - 2017 - In Duncan Pritchard & Mark Harris (eds.), Philosophy, Science and Religion for Everyone. London, UK:
    Logic is the study of the validity of arguments, which is to say the study of when a conclusion follows or does not follow from a set of premises. Logic is an ancient discipline pioneered by Aristotle and developed by some of the greatest thinkers in the Middle Ages. However, in the nineteenth century logic underwent a remarkable transformation into a precise branch of mathematics that changed the nature of logic, and the study of religion, forever. Both religious adherents and (...)
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  10. Book Review: The Greatest Possible Being by Jeff Speaks. [REVIEW]Katherin Rogers - 2019 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 11 (4):213-219.
  11. Reseña de la ‘Religión Explicada--los orígenes evolutivos del pensamiento religioso’(Religion Explained—the evolutionary origins of religious thought) por Pascal Boyer (2002) (revisión revisada 2019).Michael Richard Starks - 2019 - In Delirios Utópicos Suicidas en el Siglo 21 La filosofía, la naturaleza humana y el colapso de la civilización Artículos y reseñas 2006-2019 4a Edición. Las Vegas, NV , USA: Reality Press. pp. 300-312.
    Puede obtener un resumen rápido de este libro en p 135 o 326. Si no estás a la velocidad de la psicología evolutiva, primero debe leer uno de los numerosos textos recientes con este término en el título. Uno de los mejores es "el manual de la psicología evolutiva" 2Nd Ed por Buss. Hasta hace unos 15 años, las explicaciones del comportamiento no han sido realmente explicaciones de los procesos mentales, sino descripciones vagas y en gran medida inútiles de lo (...)
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  12. Religious Presuppositions of Logic and Rationality.Alberto Leopoldo Batista Neto - 2018 - Forum Philosophicum: International Journal for Philosophy 23 (1):5-57.
    There is a crisis in philosophical rationality today—in which modern logicisimplicated—thatcanbetracedtotheabandonmentofacommonbackground of principles. The situation has no parallel within the pre-modern tradition, which not only admits of such principles, but also refers them back to a set of assumptions grounded in a clearly religious frame of mind. Modern conceptions of rationality claim complete independence from religious sources, as from tradition more generally, and typically end up disposing of first principles altogether. The result is a fragmentation of reason, which can be (...)
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  13. Natural Theology & Classical Apologetics.Joshua Synon - manuscript
    An essay concerning the arguments from natural theology for the existence of a theistic God. This is the second edition of an essay that I felt compelled to write in 2006. The first edition was quite uncritical of the various arguments examined. However, after further study, I felt the need to revise the arguments and, ultimately, the conclusion. Although I may no longer agree with everything written in this essay it remains an important part of my spiritual journey. Some ideas (...)
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  14. Handbook of the First World Congress on Logic and Religion.Ricardo Sousa Silvestre & Jean-Yves Beziau (eds.) - 2015 - Campina Grande, PB, Brasil: EDUFCG.
  15. The Pre-Eminent Good Argument.Alexander Bozzo - forthcoming - Religious Studies.
    According to J. L. Schellenberg, a perfectly loving God wouldn't permit the occurrence of non-resistant non-believers – that is, non-believers who are both capable of believing in and relating to God, but who fail to believe through no fault of their own. Since non-resistant non-believers exist, says Schellenberg, it follows that God doesn't. A popular response to this argument is some version or other of the greater good defence. God, it's argued, is justified in hiding himself when done for the (...)
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  16. Explanation and the Problem of Evil.Paul Draper & Trent Dougherty - 2013 - In Daniel Howard Snyder & Justin McBrayer (eds.), A Companion to the Problem of Evil. pp. 71-87.
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  17. Natural Selection and the Problem of Evil.Paul Draper - 2007 - In God or Blind Nature? Philosophers Debate the Evidence.
    This chapter appeals to natural selection in order to show that the failure of many humans and animals to flourish is strong evidence against the existence of an omnipotent, omniscient, and morally perfect God. Treating theism and naturalism as hypotheses that aim to explain certain features of our world, Draper sets out to test each hypothesis against various known facts, including facts about human and animal suffering. After demonstrating that, prior to such testing, naturalism is more probable than theism in (...)
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  18. Evolution and the Problem of Evil.Paul Draper - 2014 - In Michael C. Rea & Louis P. Pojman (eds.), Philosophy of Religion: An Anthology, 7th edition. Belmont, CA, USA: pp. 271-282.
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  19. God or Blind Nature? Philosophers Debate the Evidence.Paul Draper (ed.) - 2008 - The Secular Web.
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  20. Craig's Case for God's Existence.Paul Draper - 2003 - In Stan W. Wallace (ed.), Does God Exist? The Antony Flew/William Lane Craig Debate. pp. 141-154.
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  21. God, Evil, and the Nature of Light.Paul Draper - 2017 - In Chad Meister & Paul Moser (eds.), Cambridge companion to the problem of evil. pp. 65-84.
    Scientific debates about the nature of light have nothing to do with the philosophical problem of evil if you focus on the subject matter of those debates, but quite a bit to do with it if you focus on the structure of the reasoning in those debates. Some theories of light have been shown to be improbable, at least other evidence held equal, by comparing them to incompatible theories, both with respect to how well they fit certain data and (at (...)
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  22. Where Skeptical Theism Fails, Skeptical Atheism Prevails.Paul Draper - 2016 - Oxford Studies in Philosophy of Religion 7:63-80.
    I define an ‘evidential argument from evil’ as an attempt to show that something we know about evil, while not provably incompatible with theism, is evidence against theism in the precise sense that it lowers the epistemic probability of theism being true. Such arguments must show that, for some statement e about evil that we know to be true, the antecedent probability of e given the denial theism – Pr(e/~G) – is greater than the antecedent probability of e given theism (...)
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  23. Meet the New Skeptical Theism, Same as the Old Skeptical Theism.Paul Draper - 2014 - In Trent Dougherty & Justin McBrayer (eds.), Skeptical theism: New essays. Oxford, UK: pp. 164-177.
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  24. Confirmation Theory and the Core of CORNEA.Paul Draper - 2014 - In Trent Dougherty & Justin McBrayer (eds.), Skeptical theism: New essays. Oxford, UK: pp. 132-141.
    Long before skeptical theism was called “skeptical theism,” Stephen Wykstra (1984) defended a version of it based on an epistemological principle he called CORNEA. In this paper, I use elementary confirmation theory to analyze CORNEA’s core. This enables me to show precisely what is right about Wykstra’s very influential defense of skeptical theism and, perhaps more importantly, precisely what is wrong with it. A key premise of that defense is that, on the assumption that God exists, we wouldn’t expect to (...)
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  25. Moral Imaginative Resistance to Heaven: Why the Problem of Evil is So Intractable.Chris Kramer - 2018 - de Ethica: Journal of Philosophical, Theological and Applied Ethics 1 (5):51-67.
    The majority of philosophers of religion, at least since Plantinga’s reply to Mackie’s logical problem of evil, agree that it is logically possible for an omnibenevolent, omniscient, and omnipotent God to exist who permits some of the evils we see in the actual world. This is conceivable essentially because of the possible world known as heaven. That is, heaven is an imaginable world in a similar way that logically possible scenarios in any fiction are imaginable. However, like some of the (...)
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  26. Undermining the Axiological Solution to Divine Hiddenness.Perry Hendricks & Kirk Lougheed - 2019 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 86 (1):3-15.
    Lougheed argues that a possible solution to the problem of divine hiddenness is that God hides in order to increase the axiological value of the world. In a world where God exists, the goods associated with theism necessarily obtain. But Lougheed also claims that in such a world it’s possible to experience the goods of atheism, even if they don’t actually obtain. This is what makes a world with a hidden God more valuable than a world where God is unhidden, (...)
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  27. God and the Bayesian Conception of Evidence.David Manley - forthcoming - Religious Studies.
    Contemporary arguments for and against the existence of God are often formulated within a broadly Bayesian framework. Arguments of this sort focus on a specific feature of the world that is taken to provide probabilistic evidence for or against the existence of God: the existence of life in a ‘fine-tuned’ universe, the magnitude of suffering, divine hiddenness, etc. In each case, the idea is that things were more likely to be this way if God existed than if God did not (...)
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  28. The Case Against Theism: Why the Evidence Disproves God’s Existence.Jacobus Erasmus - 2019 - International Journal of Philosophy and Theology 80 (3):303-304.
    Volume 80, Issue 3, July 2019, Page 303-304.
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  29. Maximal God: A New Defence of Perfect Being Theism, by Yujin Nagasawa. [REVIEW]Andrew M. Bailey - 2019 - Faith and Philosophy 36 (2):275-279.
  30. Is the Sacred Older Than the Gods?Guy Bennett-Hunter - 2018 - Journal of Scottish Thought 10:13–25.
  31. Analityczna filozofia religii i teologia filozoficzna / Analytic Philosophy of Religion and Philosophical Theology.Marek Pepliński - 2016 - In Janusz Salamon (ed.), Przewodnik po filozofii religii. Nurt analityczny. Kraków: WAM. pp. 437-458.
  32. Atheism.C. M. Lorkowski - 2013 - Philosophy Compass 8 (5):523-538.
    Philosophical atheism claims not only that there are no sufficient reasons for believing there is a God, but also that there are sufficient reasons for thinking no such deity exists. The purpose of this article is to explicate the typical commitments of this position. After distinguished several related views, the article will then consider typical grounds for the rejection of theistic commitments, first by showing that the theistic position makes a stronger claim and therefore carries the burden of proof. The (...)
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  33. The Explanatory Challenge: Moral Realism Is No Better Than Theism.Dan Baras - 2018 - European Journal of Philosophy 26 (1):368-389.
    Many of the arguments for and against robust moral realism parallel arguments for and against theism. In this article, I consider one of the shared challenges: the explanatory challenge. The article begins with a presentation of Harman's formulation of the explanatory challenge as applied to moral realism and theism. I then examine two responses offered by robust moral realists to the explanatory challenge, one by Russ Shafer-Landau and another by David Enoch. Shafer-Landau argues that the moral realist can plausibly respond (...)
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  34. Ordinary Morality Does Not Imply Atheism.T. Ryan Byerly - 2018 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 83 (1):85-96.
    Many theist as well as many atheist philosophers have maintained that if God exists, then every instance of undeserved, unwanted suffering ultimately benefits the sufferer. Recently, several authors have argued that this implication of theism conflicts with ordinary morality. I show that these arguments all rest on a common mistake. Defenders of these arguments overlook the role of merely potential instances of suffering in determining our moral obligations toward suffering.
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  35. How Not to Defend Positive Evidential Atheism.Paul K. Moser - 2017 - Religious Studies 53 (4):459-465.
  36. Review: Spectres of False Divinity: Hume's Moral Atheism. [REVIEW]Ryan Nichols - 2012 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 10 (1):117-120.
  37. The God Delusion. By Richard Dawkins: Book Reviews. [REVIEW]Peter Milward - 2008 - Heythrop Journal 49 (4):696-700.
  38. Spectres of False Divinity: Hume’s Moral Atheism. [REVIEW]David O’Connor - 2010 - Hume Studies 36 (2):236-239.
    The main thesis developed and defended in this superb book is that Hume implicitly "denies the existence . . . of a morally assessable god" (8), not just the existence of an overall "morally praiseworthy god" (8). Holden characterizes these as "strong" and "weak" moral atheism, respectively (7–9). While the idea of Hume as a moral atheist is not new, Holden's case for that proposition makes two new and important contributions to the discussion of the issue. The first is his (...)
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  39. Atheism, Religion and Enlightenment in Pre‐Revolutionary Europe. By Mark Curran. Pp. Viii, 218, Woodbridge, The Royal Historical Society/The Boydell Press, 2012, £50.00. [REVIEW]Jan Marten Ivo Klaver - 2013 - Heythrop Journal 54 (3):518-519.
  40. Intentionality and Atheism: Sartre and Maritain.Frederick J. Crosson - 1987 - Modern Schoolman 64 (3):151-160.
  41. Atheism & Theism. [REVIEW]Martin Perlmutter - 1999 - Dialogue 38 (3):609-609.
    The latest volume in the Great Debate in Philosophy series has Smart and Haldane defending the virtues of atheism and theism, respectively. In keeping with the format of this series, each author presents an original essay defending his views, then responds to the other’s views. Additionally, in this volume, Smart and Haldane jointly write a helpful introduction to begin the volume, an insightful afterword to conclude it, and a useful bibliography with which the reader can pursue issues raised in their (...)
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  42. Recent Objections to Perfect Knowledge and Classical Approaches to Omniscience.Benjamin W. McCraw - 2016 - Philosophy and Theology 28 (1):259-270.
    Patrick Grim and Einar Duenger Bohn have recently argued that there can be no perfectly knowing Being. In particular, they urge that the object of omniscience is logically absurd or requires an impossible maximal point of all knowledge. I argue that, given a more classical notion of omniscience found in Aquinas and Augustine, we can shift the focus of perfect knowledge from what that being must know to the mode of that being’s understanding. Since Grim and Bohn focus on the (...)
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  43. Atheism and Theism.Hugh J. McCann, J. J. C. Smart & J. J. Haldane - 1998 - Philosophical Review 107 (3):462.
    In this volume, the sixth in Blackwell's Great Debates in Philosophy series, Smart and Haldane discuss the case for and against religious belief. The debate is unusual in beginning with the negative side. After a short jointly authored introduction, there is a fairly extended presentation of the atheist position by Smart. Haldane then offers an equally extended defense of theism. The authors respond to one another in the same order, and the book concludes with a brief co-authored treatment of antirealism, (...)
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  44. “Scientific Atheism” in Action.Svetlana M. Klimova & Elena S. Molostova - 2013 - Forum Philosophicum: International Journal for Philosophy 18 (2):169-190.
  45. Contemporary Atheism and the Religious Mind.Gabriel Marcel - 1960 - Philosophy Today 4 (4):252-262.
  46. The No-Minimum Argument and Satisficing: A Reply to Chris Dragos.Jeff Jordan - 2014 - Religious Studies 50 (3):379-386.
    Chris Dragos has recently presented two objections to criticisms I've published against Peter van Inwagen's No-Minimum argument. He also suggests that the best way to criticize the No-Minimum argument is via the concept of divine satisficing. In this article I argue that both of Dragos's objections fail, and I question whether satisficing is relevant to the viability of the No-Minimum argument.
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  47. Paul Tillich and Divine Ineffability.Guy Bennett-Hunter - 2016 - In Mireille Hébert & Anne Marie Reijnen (eds.), Paul Tillich et Karl Barth: Antagonismes et accords théologiques. LIT Verlag. pp. 79–92.
    “Guy Bennett-Hunter dans «Tillich and Divine lneffabililty» affirme l‘étroite correlation entre l’affirmation tillichienne de l’ineffabilité divine et le rejet de l’ontothéologie. L’affirmation de leur incompatibilité lui semble une contribution majeure de Tillich à la pensée religieuse. Guy Bennett-Hunter part des déclarations bien connues où Tillich affirme que l’on ne saurait, à proprement parler, attribuer l’existence a Dieu puisque Dieu est «être même au-delà de l’essence et de l’existence». En d’autres termes, Dieu «mystére de l’être», «fondement et abîme de la raison», (...)
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  48. Debunking Arguments and the Cognitive Science of Religion.Matthew Braddock - 2016 - Theology and Science 14 (3):268-287.
    Do the cognitive origins of our theistic beliefs debunk them or explain them away? This paper develops an empirically-motivated debunking argument and defends it against objections. First, we introduce the empirical and epistemological background. Second, we develop and defend the main argument, the debunking argument from false god beliefs. Third, we characterize and evaluate the most prominent religious debunking argument to date, the debunking argument from insensitivity. It is found that insensitivity-based arguments are problematic, which makes them less promising than (...)
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  49. Dawkins’ Godless Delusion.J. Angelo Corlett - 2009 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 65 (3):125-138.
    A philosophical assessment of Richard Dawkins' The God Delusion, exposing some errors of reasoning that undermine part of the foundation of his atheism. Distinctions between theism, atheism and agnosticism are also provided and explored for their significance to Dawkins' argument.
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  50. Status of Research on Scientific Atheism.Russel P. Moroziuk - 1973 - Studies in Soviet Thought 13 (1-2):89-91.
1 — 50 / 2268