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1 — 50 / 177
  1. added 2020-05-05
    Aristotle’s Explanations of Monstrous Births and Deformities in Generation of Animals 4.4.Sophia Connell - 2018 - In A. Falcon & D. Lefebvre (eds.), Aristotle's Generation of Animals: A Critical Guide. Cambridge, U.K: Cambridge University Press. pp. 207-223.
    Given that they are chance events, there can be no scientific demonstration or knowledge of monsters. There are still, however, many recognizable elements of scientific explanation in Aristotle's Generation of Animals Book IV chapter 4. What happens in cases of monsters and deformities occurs in the process of generation, and there is much that we can know scientifically about this process—working from the animal’s essential attributes outward to factors that influence these processes. In particular, we find Aristotle looking for and (...)
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  2. added 2020-05-05
    From Natural Character to Moral Virtue in Aristotle, by Mariska Leunissen. [REVIEW]Sophia M. Connell - 2018 - Mind 127 (507):938-946.
    From Natural Character to Moral Virtue in Aristotle, by LeunissenMariska. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017. Pp. vii + 216.
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  3. added 2020-05-05
    Aristotle on Female Animals: A Study of the Generation of Animals.Sophia M. Connell - 2015 - Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    Aristotle's account of female nature has received mostly negative treatment, emphasising what he says females cannot do. Building on recent research, this book comprehensively revises such readings, setting out the complex and positive role played by the female in Aristotle's thought with a particular focus on the longest surviving treatise on reproduction in the ancient corpus, the Generation of Animals. It provides new interpretations of the nature of Aristotle's sexism, his theory of male and female interaction in generation, and his (...)
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  4. added 2020-05-03
    F Amerini, Tommaso d’Aquino. Origine e fine della vita umana. [REVIEW]Sergio Volodia Marcello Cremaschi - 2010 - Rivista di Filosofia Neo-Scolastica 102 (4):716-718.
    Amerini declares that by this book he did not want to make any contribution to the contemporary bioethical debate, or in another way, he wanted to give a preliminary contribution of great importance. His opinion on the implications of Aquinas's embryological theory for today's bioethical debate is in fact that it "certainly has some bioethical consequences, but it does not give rise to one particular bioethical theory rather than another. It is, as said, a philosophical explanation, traced in terms of (...)
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  5. added 2020-04-02
    Out of Thin Air? Diogenes on Causal Explanation.Bryan C. Reece - 2020 - In Hynek Bartoš & Colin King (eds.), Heat, Pneuma, and Soul in Ancient Philosophy and Medicine. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 106-120.
    Diogenes subscribes to a principle that, roughly, causal interaction and change require a certain sort of uniformity among the relata. Attending to this principle can help us understand Diogenes's relationship to the superficially similar Anaximenes without insisting, as some do, that Diogenes must be consciously responding to Parmenides. Diogenes is distinctive and philosophically interesting because his principle combines two senses of ‘archê’ (principle, starting-point), namely, the idea of source or origin and that of underlying (material) principle, and gives the rudiments (...)
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  6. added 2020-03-05
    Being, Nature, and Life in Aristotle: Essays in Honor of Alan Gotthelf. [REVIEW]Monte Johnson - 2011 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2011 (02).
  7. added 2020-03-04
    The Medical Background of Aristotle's Theory of Nature and Spontaneity.Monte Johnson - 2012 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 27:105-152.
    An appreciation of the "more philosophical" aspects of ancient medical writings casts considerable light on Aristotle's concept of nature, and how he understands nature to differ from art, on the one hand, and spontaneity or luck, on the other. The account of nature, and its comparison with art and spontaneity in Physics II is developed with continual reference to the medical art. The notion of spontaneous remission of disease (without the aid of the medical art) was a controversial subject in (...)
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  8. added 2020-03-01
    The Principle of Life: from Aristotelian Psyche to Drieschian Entelechy.Agustin Ostachuk - 2016 - Ludus Vitalis 24 (45):37-59.
    Is life a simple result of a conjunction of physico-chemical processes? Can be reduced to a mere juxtaposition of spatially determined events? What epistemology or world-view allows us to comprehend it? Aristotle built a novel philosophical system in which nature is a dynamical totality which is in constant movement. Life is a manifestation of it, and is formed and governed by the psyche. Psyche is the organizational principle of the different biological levels: nutritive, perceptive and intelective. Driesch's crucial experiment provided (...)
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  9. added 2020-02-18
    Philosophy and Dietetics in the Hippocratic On Regimen: A Delicate Balance of Health. By Hynek Bartos. [REVIEW]Monte Ransome Johnson - 2020 - Ancient Philosophy 40 (1):221-227.
    Hynek Bartos does the field of ancient philosophy a great service by detailing the influence of early Greek thinkers (such as Heraclitus, Empedocles, Anaxagoras, Democritus, and Diogenes of Apollonia) on the Hippocratic work On Regimen, and by demonstrating that work’s innovative engagement with contemporary scientific and philosophical concepts as well as its direct influence on Plato and Aristotle. His study usefully counteracts the lamentable tendency among ancient philosophers to ignore or downplay the influence of medical literature on philosophy in general, (...)
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  10. added 2019-12-13
    Movement as Efficient Cause in Aristotle’s Generation of Animals.Ignacio De Ribera-Martin - 2019 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 9 (2):296-326.
    In this article, I present in a systematic way Aristotle’s understanding of movement (kinêsis) as efficient cause in the Generation of Animals. This aspect of movement is not disclosed in the approach to movement as an incomplete activity in contrast to energeia, which has been extensively discussed in the literature. I explain in which sense movement is the efficient cause of generation and how this movement is related to the other factors, in particular the source of movement, the seminal fluid, (...)
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  11. added 2019-11-13
    Aristotle and the Origins of Evil.Jozef Müller - 2020 - Phronesis: A Journal for Ancient Philosophy 65 (2):179-223.
    The paper addresses the following question: why do human beings, on Aristotle’s view, have an innate tendency to badness, that is, to developing desires that go beyond, and often against, their natural needs? Given Aristotle’s teleological assumptions (including the thesis that nature does nothing in vain), such tendency should not be present. I argue that the culprit is to be found in the workings of rationality. In particular, it is the presence of theoretical reason that necessitates the limitless nature of (...)
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  12. added 2019-09-17
    Trama analógica do De motu animalium de Aristóteles: Funções básicas e modus operandi das analogias estruturantes.Eraci Gonçalves de Oliveira - 2019 - Anais de Filosofia Clássica 13 (25):87-114.
  13. added 2019-07-21
    Aspectos de Processos Necessários e Princípios Gerativos na análise do Vivente em Aristóteles.Rodrigo Romão de Carvalho - 2019 - Problemata 10 (1):5-10.
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  14. added 2019-06-13
    Notes From Narnia (on the Human Body).Samuel Baker - 2019 - Think 18 (52):81-86.
    What is a human body? Some reasons are given for thinking that, in the primary case, it is a body that is both of and suitable to a rational animal.
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  15. added 2019-06-07
    Kausalität Und Zufatt in der Philosophic des Aristoteles. [REVIEW]D. A. Rees - 1946 - The Classical Review 60 (2):96-97.
  16. added 2019-06-06
    Aristotle's Anthropology.Nora Kreft & Geert Keil (eds.) - 2019 - Cambridge University Press.
    This is the first collection of essays devoted specifically to the nature and significance of Aristotle's anthropological philosophy, covering the full range of his ethical, metaphysical and biological works. The book is organised into four parts, two of which deal with the metaphysics and biology of human nature and two of which discuss the anthropological foundations and implications of Aristotle's ethico-political works. The essay topics range from human nature and morality to friendship and politics, including original discussion and fresh perspectives (...)
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  17. added 2019-06-06
    Aristotle’s Biological Works as Scientific Literature.Sabine Föllinger - 2012 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 43 (2):237-244.
  18. added 2019-06-06
    Aristotle and Galen on Sex Difference and Reproduction: A New Approach to an Ancient Rivalry.Sophia M. Connell - 1999 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 31 (3):405-427.
    In contrast to Aristotle's male oriented explanation of procreation the Galenic was 'feminist' inasmuch as both sexes were presented as contributing equally in conception and accordingly both had to experience pleasure... Anatomically, the two sexes were presented in Galenic accounts as complementary, the difference being that the man's genitalia were on the outside and the woman's on the inside. The clitoris was likened to the penis and the ovaries considered 'testicles' or 'stones' that produced seed. The male seed was, it (...)
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  19. added 2019-06-06
    Philosophical Issues in Aristotle’s Biology. [REVIEW]Paul Carrick - 1990 - International Studies in Philosophy 22 (3):108-109.
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  20. added 2019-06-06
    Simple Necessity in Aristotle’s Biology.Robert Friedman - 1987 - International Studies in Philosophy 19 (1):1-9.
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  21. added 2019-06-06
    Aristotle's Biological Studies. [REVIEW]Jonathan Barnes - 1984 - The Classical Review 34 (1):55-57.
  22. added 2019-06-06
    La Classification des Animaux Chez Aristote. Statut de la Biologie Et Unité de L'Aristotelisme. [REVIEW]Jonathan Barnes - 1983 - The Classical Review 33 (2):334-335.
  23. added 2019-06-06
    Aristotle's de Motu Animalium. [REVIEW]Jonathan Barnes - 1980 - The Classical Review 30 (2):222-226.
  24. added 2019-06-06
    The Budé History of Animals. [REVIEW]A. L. Peck - 1966 - The Classical Review 16 (3):314-315.
  25. added 2019-06-06
    Aristotle's De Generatione. [REVIEW]Edward S. Forster - 1944 - The Classical Review 58 (2):54-55.
  26. added 2019-06-06
    The Works of Aristotle. [REVIEW]F. H. A. Marshall - 1911 - The Classical Review 25 (7):208-209.
  27. added 2019-06-06
    The Works of Aristotle. [REVIEW]F. H. A. Marshall - 1911 - The Classical Review 25 (3):85-87.
  28. added 2019-06-05
    David Ebrey, Ed. Theory and Practice in Aristotle’s Natural Science. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015. Pp. Viii+261. $99.00. [REVIEW]Tiberiu Popa - 2016 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 6 (2):354-357.
  29. added 2019-05-24
    Aristotle's Biological Studies - Michael Boylan: Method and Practice in Aristotle's Biology. Pp.300; 7 Figures. Washington D.C.: University Press of America, 1983. $22.50. [REVIEW]Jonathan Barnes - 1984 - The Classical Review 34 (1):55-57.
  30. added 2019-05-20
    Dynamic Boundaries: Place in Aristotle’s Biology.Nathan Andersen - 2004 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 25 (1):5-29.
    Place, as Aristotle defines it, is to be sharply distinguished from merely geometrical space. Places, unlike geometrical spaces, are not indifferent to that which they contain. Indeed, they seem to have a kind of power. For unless something interferes, things gravitate naturally toward places that suit them. This power that Aristotle attributes to place is obvious not only in the case of elemental bodies, but much more so in the case of animals, whose very existence depends upon their inhabitation of (...)
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  31. added 2019-03-23
    Two Conceptions of Soul in Aristotle.Christopher Frey - 2015 - In David Ebrey (ed.), Theory and Practice in Aristotle's Natural Science. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 137-160.
    Aristotle outlines two methods in De Anima that one can employ when one investigates the soul. The first focuses on the exercises of a living organism’s vital capacities and the proper objects upon which these activities are directed. The second focuses on a living organism’s nature, its internal principle of movement and rest, and the single end for the sake of which this principle is exercised. I argue that these two methods yield importantly different, and prima facie incompatible, views about (...)
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  32. added 2019-03-23
    From Blood to Flesh: Homonymy, Unity, and Ways of Being in Aristotle.Christopher Frey - 2015 - Ancient Philosophy 35 (2):375-394.
    My topic is the fundamental Aristotelian division between the animate and the inanimate. In particular, I discuss the transformation that occurs when an inanimate body comes to be ensouled. When nutriment is transformed into flesh it is first changed into blood. I argue that blood is unique in being, at one and the same time, both animate and inanimate; it is inanimate nutriment in actuality (or in activity) and animate flesh in potentiality (or in capacity). I provide a detailed exposition (...)
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  33. added 2019-03-21
    Aristotle on Teleology.Monte Ransome Johnson - 2008 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    Monte Johnson examines one of the most controversial aspects of Aristiotle's natural philosophy: his teleology. Is teleology about causation or explanation? Does it exclude or obviate mechanism, determinism, or materialism? Is it focused on the good of individual organisms, or is god or man the ultimate end of all processes and entities? Is teleology restricted to living things, or does it apply to the cosmos as a whole? Does it identify objectively existent causes in the world, or is it merely (...)
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  34. added 2019-03-05
    A necessidade no processo constitutivo das composições naturais em Aristóteles.Rodrigo Romão de Carvalho - 2019 - Griot: Revista de Filosofia 19 (1):115-126.
  35. added 2019-03-05
    Beyond Acting and Being Acted Upon.Emanuela Bianchi - 2018 - Philosophy Today 62 (3):1025-1036.
  36. added 2018-12-28
    Teleologia e necessidade Natural em Aristóteles.Rodrigo Romão de Carvalho - 2018 - Guairacá Revista de Filosofia 34 (2):134-150.
  37. added 2018-12-27
    Agregados, mistos e organismos vivos em Aristóteles: um delineamento de Scala Naturae.Rodrigo Romão de Carvalho - 2018 - Filosofia E História da Biologia 13 (2):263-278.
  38. added 2018-10-07
    Seed (Sperma) and Kuêma in Aristotle’s Generation of Animals.Ignacio De Ribera-Martin - 2019 - Journal of the History of Biology 52 (1):87-124.
    There are two different notions of seed at work in the Generation of Animals: seed as the spermatic residue, which concerns only the male and the female generative contributions, and seed as the kuêma and first mixture of the two generative contributions. The latter is a notion of seed common to plants and animals. The passage in GA I.18, 724b12–22 where Aristotle distinguishes between these two notions of seed has been mistakenly discredited as inauthentic or simply as irrelevant for understanding (...)
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  39. added 2018-10-01
    Changing Kinds: Aristotle and the Aristotelians.Stephen R. L. Clark - 2015 - Diametros 45:19-34.
    Aristotle is routinely blamed for several errors that, it is supposed, held 'science' back for centuries - among others, a belief in distinct, homogenous and unchanging species of living creatures, an essentialist account of human nature, and a suggestion that 'slavery' was a natural institution. This paper briefly examines Aristotle's own arguments and opinions, and the perils posed by a contrary belief in changeable species. Contrary to received opinion even amongst some of his followers, Aristotle was not a species essentialist (...)
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  40. added 2018-09-11
    Why De Anima Needs III.12-13.Robert Howton - manuscript
    The soul is an explanatory principle of Aristotle’s natural science, accounting both for the fact that living things are alive as well as for the diverse natural attributes that belong to them by virtue of being alive. I argue that the explanatory role of the soul in Aristotle’s natural science must be understood in light of his view, stated in a controversial passage from Parts of Animals (645b14–20), that the soul of a living thing is a “complex activity” of its (...)
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  41. added 2018-08-24
    Teleology Without Tears: Aristotle and the Role of Mechanistic Conceptions of Organisms.Sylvia Berryman - 2007 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 37 (3):351-369.
    In this paper I outline a role for mechanistic conceptions of organisms in ancient Greek natural philosophy, especially the study of organisms. By ‘mechanistic conceptions’ I mean the use of ideas and techniques drawn from the field of mechanics to investigate the natural world. ‘Mechanistic conceptions’ of organisms in ancient Greek philosophy, then, are those that draw on the ancient understanding of the field called ‘mechanics’ — hê mêchanikê technê—to investigate living things, rather than those bearing some perceived similarity to (...)
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  42. added 2018-06-12
    Aristotelian Mechanistic Explanation.Monte Johnson - 2017 - In J. Rocca (ed.), Teleology in the Ancient World: philosophical and medical approaches. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 125-150.
    In some influential histories of ancient philosophy, teleological explanation and mechanistic explanation are assumed to be directly opposed and mutually exclusive alternatives. I contend that this assumption is deeply flawed, and distorts our understanding both of teleological and mechanistic explanation, and of the history of mechanistic philosophy. To prove this point, I shall provide an overview of the first systematic treatise on mechanics, the short and neglected work Mechanical Problems, written either by Aristotle or by a very early member of (...)
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  43. added 2018-06-06
    Blood, Matter, and Necessity.David Ebrey - 2015 - In Theory and Practice in Aristotle's Natural Science. Cambridge, UK: pp. 61-76.
    According to most scholars, in the Parts of Animals Aristotle frequently provides explanations in terms of material necessity, as well as explanations in terms of that-for-the-sake-of-which, i.e., final causes. In this paper, I argue that we misunderstand both matter and the way that Aristotle explains things using necessity if we interpret Aristotle as explaining things in terms of material necessity. Aristotle does not use the term “matter” very frequently in his detailed discussions of animal parts; when he does use it, (...)
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  44. added 2018-05-28
    Definition and the Epistemology of Natural Kinds in Aristotle.Nathanael Stein - 2018 - Metaphysics 1 (1):33–51.
    We have reason to think that a fundamental goal of natural science, on Aristotle’s view, is to discover the essence-specifying definitions of natural kinds—with biological species as perhaps the most obvious case. However, we have in the end precious little evidence regarding what an Aristotelian definition of the form of a natural kind would look like, and so Aristotle’s view remains especially obscure precisely where it seems to be most applicable. I argue that if we can get a better understanding (...)
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  45. added 2018-05-10
    Was Aristotle the ‘Father’ of the Epigenesis Doctrine?Ina Goy - 2018 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 40 (2):28.
    Was Aristotle the ‘father’ and founder of the epigenesis doctrine? Historically, I will argue, this question must be answered with ‘no’. Aristotle did not initiate and had no access to a debate that described itself in terms of ‘epigenesis’ and ‘preformation’, and thus cannot be considered the ‘father’ or founder of the epigenesis-preformation controversy in a literal sense. But many ancient accounts of reproduction and embryological development contain analogies to what early modern scientist called ‘epigenesis’ and ‘preformation’, and, in this (...)
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  46. added 2018-04-25
    Science in Aristotle's Natural Treatises.Barbara Botter - 2015 - Aporia 10:13-28.
  47. added 2018-04-05
    As 'Διαστάσεις' em Aristóteles: entre as potências da alma e a tridimensionalidade do corpo.Matheus Oliveira Damião - 2018 - Dissertation, UFRJ, Brazil
  48. added 2018-02-18
    Aristotle on Genera, Species, And?The More and the Less?James G. Lennox - 1980 - Journal of the History of Biology 13 (2):321-346.
  49. added 2018-01-10
    A substancialidade orgânica e a sua preservação no ser a partir da concepção aristotélica de natureza.Rodrigo Romão de Carvalho - 2015 - Anais Do Encontro de História E Filosofia da Biologia 2015.
  50. added 2017-12-29
    O onde antes do lugar: as διαστάσεις no De incessu animalium de Aristóteles.Matheus Oliveira Damião - 2017 - Codex 5 (2):155-180.
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