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  1. Aristotle’s Categories from Plotinus to Iamblichus.Riccardo Chiaradonna - 2024 - Chiaradonna, R. 2024. Aristotle’s Categories From Plotinus to Iamblichus. Works of Philosophy and Their Reception [Online]. Berlin, Boston: De Gruyter. Available From: Https://Www.Degruyter.Com/Database/Wpr/Entry/Wpr.28298978/Html.
    This article focuses on the reception of Aristotle’s Categories by the first three representatives of Greek Neoplatonism: Plotinus (204/205–270 CE), Porphyry (ca. 234–ca. 305 CE), Iamblichus (ca. 242–ca. 325 CE). The first section argues that Plotinus’ acquaintance with Aristotle’s treatises marked a fresh start vis-à-vis the previous Platonist tradition. Aristotle’s views, arguments and vocabulary are ubiquitous in Plotinus writings (the Enneads) and they must be considered an essential part of his philosophical project. Plotinus, however, does not share some of Aristotle’s (...)
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  2. Aristotle on Artifactual Substances.Phil Corkum - 2023 - Metaphysics 6 (1):24-36.
    It is standardly held that Aristotle denies that artifacts are substances. There is no consensus on why this is so, and proposals include taking artifacts to lack autonomy, to be merely accidental unities, and to be impermanent. In this paper, I argue that Aristotle holds that artifacts are substances. However, where natural substances are absolutely fundamental, artifacts are merely relatively fundamental—like any substance, an artifact can ground such nonsubstances as its qualities; but artifacts are themselves partly grounded in natural substances. (...)
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  3. Secondary Substance and Quod Quid Erat Esse: Aquinas on Reconciling the Divisions of "Substance" in the Categories and Metaphysics.Elliot Polsky - 2022 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 96 (1):21-45.
    Modern commentators recognize the irony of Aristotle’s Categories becoming a central text for Platonic schools. For similar reasons, these commentators would perhaps be surprised to see Aquinas’s In VII Metaphysics, where he apparently identifies the secondary substance of Aristotle’s Categories with a false Platonic sense of “substance” as if, for Aristotle, only Platonists would say secondary substances are substances. This passage in Aquinas’s commentary has led Mgr. Wippel to claim that, for Aquinas, secondary substance and essence are not the same (...)
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  4. The Anatomy of Primary Substance in Aristotle's Categories.Francesco Ademollo - 2021 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 60:145-202.
    This paper investigates two related aspects of Aristotle’s conception of primary substances in the Categories. In Section 1 I distinguish different interpretations of the relation between a primary substance and its accidental attributes: one (A) according to which a primary substance encompasses all of its attributes, including the accidental ones; another (B) according to which a primary substance encompasses only its essential attributes, whereas the accidental attributes are extrinsic to the substance, though related to it; and a third, intermediate one (...)
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  5. Aristotle’s Disturbing Relatives.Kyungnam Moon - 2021 - Apeiron 54 (4):451-472.
    In Categories 7, Aristotle gives two different accounts of relatives, and presents the principle of cognitive symmetry, which seems to help distinguish between relatives and some secondary substances. I suggest that the long-disputed difference between the two accounts lies in a difference in the determination of the categorial status of the object in question, and I formulate the principle of cognitive symmetry such that it plays a crucial role in making explicit how one conceptualizes the categorial status of the object. (...)
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  6. The Concept of Priority in Aristotle's Categories.Remus Breazu - 2020 - Revue Roumaine de Philosophie 64 (1):169-181.
    In Categories 12 Aristotle gives several meanings of the concept of priority. Since this chapter belongs to what was traditionally called “post-predicaments,” Aristotle’s presentation of priority was rather neglected by commentators. In this paper, I analyse the concept of priority as it is presented by Aristotle in Categories 12. First, I analyse priority with respect to opposites, contraries, and relatives. Second, I investigate each of the five meanings, and I show their inner connection with other concepts from Categories. Furthermore, I (...)
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  7. Ancient.Phil Corkum - 2020 - In Michael J. Raven (ed.), Routledge Handbook of Metaphysical Grounding. New York: pp. 20-32.
    Is there grounding in ancient philosophy? To ask a related but different question: is grounding a useful tool for the scholar of ancient philosophy? These questions are difficult, and my goal in this paper is not so much to give definitive answers as to clarify the questions. I hope to direct the student of contemporary metaphysics towards passages where it may be fruitful to look for historical precedent. But I also hope to offer the student of ancient philosophy some guidance (...)
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  8. The Ontological Status of Human Speech in Aristotle‘s "Categories".Pavol Labuda - 2019 - Filosoficky Casopis 67 (6):877-894.
    The subject of this paper is the issue of human speech in Aristotle, especially in his work Categories. Its primary goal is to elaborate an interpretation of Aristotle’s statements about human speech as a quantity (Cat. 4b20–b39, 5a15–b2) that would allow them to fit reasonably into the whole of Aristotle’s theory of language. The structure of the paper is as follows. In the first part a certain approach to the question of the reconstruction of Aristotle’s theory of language is proposed. (...)
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  9. Em defesa das Categorias de Aristóteles.Thiago Silva Freitas Oliveira - 2019 - Prometheus 30:299-318.
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  10. Some Notes on Predication.Roberto Pinzani - 2019 - In Fabrizio Amerini, Simone Fellina & Andrea Strazzoni (eds.), _Tra antichità e modernità. Studi di storia della filosofia medievale e rinascimentale_. Raccolti da Fabrizio Amerini, Simone Fellina e Andrea Strazzoni. Parma: E-theca OnLineOpenAccess Edizioni. pp. 71-82.
    In the Categories Aristotle defines the analytic relationship of ‘being said’ in terms of ordinary categorical predication. The interpreters found themselves facing different interpretative problems, among others the meaning of categorial terms, how to understand the predication relation or the predication relations, what properties these relations have, etc. In the present brief contribution I consider two questions concerning transitivity and the metaphysical meaning of Aristotelian definitions.
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  11. Aristotle’s Categories in the 19th Century.Colin Guthrie King - 2018 - In Christof Rapp, Colin G. King & Gerald Hartung (eds.), Aristotelian Studies in 19th Century Philosophy. Boston: De Gruyter. pp. 11-36.
  12. The Middle Included - Logos in Aristotle.Ömer Aygün - 2016 - Evanston, Illinois, Amerika Birleşik Devletleri: Northwestern University Press.
    The Middle Included is a systematic exploration of the meanings of logos throughout Aristotle’s work. It claims that the basic meaning is “gathering,” a relation that holds its terms together without isolating them or collapsing one to the other. This meaning also applies to logos in the sense of human language. Aristotle describes how some animals are capable of understanding non-firsthand experience without being able to relay it, while others relay it without understanding. Aygün argues that what distinguishes human language, (...)
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  13. Arystotelesowskie ujęcie homonimii.Mikołaj Domaradzki - 2016 - Diametros 50:1-24.
    The purpose of the paper is to discuss Aristotle’s account of homonymy. The major thesis advocated here is that Aristotle considers both entities and words to be homonymous, depending on the object of his criticism. Thus, when he takes issue with Plato, he tends to view homonymy more ontologically, upon which it is entities that become homonymous. When, on the other hand, he gainsays the exegetes or the sophists, he is inclined to perceive homonymy more semantically, upon which it is (...)
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  14. Categorias, Da Interpretação (Aristóteles, Obras Completas).Ricardo Santos - 2016 - Lisboa: Imprensa Nacional - Casa da Moeda.
  15. Glosse Categoriarum»: un commento anonimo del XII sec. alle «Categorie.Marco Sirtoli - 2016 - Noctua 3 (2):339-460.
    This work aims to a critical edition of an Aristotle’s Categories commentary, transmitted by M2 codex of St. Ambrose’s Chapter Archive in Milan. Written in Northern Italy, in the 12th century, it was probably a handbook for Chapter School. It is based upon some passages from the auctoritates, as it’s evident from the heading: incipiunt flores glosse categoriarum. It deals whit fundamental logical issues, and it presents a widespread use of the status’s theory, in order to solve some of the (...)
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  16. Andronicus sparked the exegetical history of Aristotle's categories. M.j. Griffin Aristotle's categories in the early Roman empire. Pp. XIV + 283. Oxford: Oxford university press, 2015. Cased, £55, us$90. Isbn: 978-0-19-872473-5. [REVIEW]Daniel James Vecchio - 2016 - The Classical Review 66 (2):371-373.
  17. O problema das categorias nas Categorias de Aristóteles: uma abordagem baseada nos relativos.Igor M. Morici - 2015 - Ética E Filosofia Política 18 (2):76-96.
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  18. Forma lógica Das proposições científicas E ontologia da predicação: Um falso dilema nos segundos analíticos de aristóteles.Breno Andrade Zuppolini - 2014 - Philósophos - Revista de Filosofia 19 (2):11-45.
    In the Posterior Analytics, Aristotle imposes some requirements on the formulation of scientific propositions: their terms must be able to perform the role of subject as well as of predicate; their terms should be universal; every demonstration must involve “primary” subjects denoted by terms that “cannot be said of another underlying subject”. Several interpreters, inspired by theses from the Categories, believed that this third requirement refers to names and descriptions of particular substances as basic subjects of predicative statements, since they (...)
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  19. Which 'Athenodorus' Commented on Aristotle's Categories?Michael J. Griffin - 2013 - Classical Quarterly 63 (1):199-208.
    The principate of Augustus coincided with a surge of interest in the short Aristotelian treatise which we now entitle Categories, contributing to its later installation at the outset of the philosophical curriculum and its traditional function as an introduction to logic. Thanks in part to remarks made by Plutarch and Porphyry , the origin of this interest has often been traced to Andronicus of Rhodes: his catalogue and publication of the Aristotelian corpus began with the Categories and may have drawn (...)
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  20. DISTINÇÃO ENTRE PREDICAÇÃO E INERÊNCIA NAS CATEGORIAS DE ARISTÓTELES.Thiago Silva Freitas Oliveira - 2013 - Dissertation, University of Campinas
  21. FIO CONDUTOR DE ARISTÓTELES NA TÁBUA DAS CATEGORIAS.Vicente do Prado Tolezano - 2013 - Dissertation, Faculdade de São Bento, São Paulo
  22. The unity of Aristotle's category of relatives.Orna Harari - 2011 - Classical Quarterly 61 (2):521-537.
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  23. Composite Substances as True Wholes: Toward a Modified Nyāya-Vaiśeṣika Theory of Composite Substances.John Kronen & Jacob Tuttle - 2011 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 41 (2):289-316.
    In the Categories Aristotle defined substance as that which is neither predicable of nor in another. In saying that a substance is not predicable of another, Aristotle meant to exclude genera and species from the category substance. Aman is a substance but not man. In saying that a substance is not in another, Aristotle meant to exclude property particulars from the category. A man is a substance, not his color. The Categories treats substances as simples. Though a particular substance, Bucephalus (...)
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  24. Aristotle on Nonsubstantial Individuals.Phil Corkum - 2009 - Ancient Philosophy 29 (2):289-310.
    As a first stab, call a property recurrent if it can be possessed by more than one object, and nonrecurrent if it can be possessed by at most one object. The question whether Aristotle holds that there are nonrecurrent properties has spawned a lively and ongoing debate among commentators over the last forty-five years. One source of textual evidence in the Categories, drawn on in this debate, is Aristotle’s claim that certain properties are inseparable from what they are in. Here (...)
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  25. Aristotle on Ontological Dependence.Phil Corkum - 2008 - Phronesis 53 (1):65 - 92.
    Aristotle holds that individual substances are ontologically independent from nonsubstances and universal substances but that non-substances and universal substances are ontologically dependent on substances. There is then an asymmetry between individual substances and other kinds of beings with respect to ontological dependence. Under what could plausibly be called the standard interpretation, the ontological independence ascribed to individual substances and denied of non-substances and universal substances is a capacity for independent existence. There is, however, a tension between this interpretation and the (...)
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  26. As Categorias de Aristóteles e suas categorias.Igor Mota Morici - 2008 - Dissertation, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais
  27. Aristotle’s Categories.Ludger Jansen - 2007 - Topoi 26 (1):153-158.
    Being an "untimely review", this paper reviews Aristotle's 'Categories' as if they were published today, in the era of computerised information, where categorisation becomes more and more essential for information retrieval. I suggest a systematic ordering of Aristotle's list of categories and argue that Aristotle's discussion of ontological dependency and his focus on concrete entities are still a source of new insight and can indeed be read as a contribution to the emerging field of applied ontology and ontological engineering.
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  28. Quantities and Contraries: Aristotle's "Categories" 6, 5b11-6a18.Pavel Gregoric - 2006 - Apeiron 39 (4):341 - 358.
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  29. Aristoteles’ Kategorie des Relativen zwischen Dialektik und Ontologie.Ludger Jansen - 2006 - Philosophie­Geschichte Und Logische Analyse 9.
    Like the doctrine of the categories in general, Aristotle’s category of the relative fulfils disparate functions: On the one hand, the category of the pros ti fulfils a dialectic or logical function that aims at the avoidance of fallacies. On the other hand, the category respects the peculiar mode of being of the relative. Taking these two different functions into consideration helps with the interpretation of Aristotle’s two definitions of the relative and his treatment of the properties of the relative (...)
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  30. R. Thiel, C. Lohr: Ammonius Hermeae: Commentaria in quinque voces Porphyrii. übersetzt von Pomponius Gauricus. In Aristotelis categorias . übersetzt von Ioannes Baptista Rasarius. Pp. xxii + 108. Stuttgart-Bad Cannstatt: frommann-holzboog, 2002. Cased, €148. ISBN:3-7728-1229-5. [REVIEW]Andrew Smith - 2004 - The Classical Review 54 (2):569-569.
  31. Aristotle's Category of Quantity: A Unified Interpretation.Paul Studtmann - 2004 - Apeiron 37 (1):69 - 91.
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  32. Aristotle's Category of Quality: A Regimented Interpretation.Paul Studtmann - 2003 - Apeiron 36 (3):205 - 227.
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  33. Finding Things Out W.-R. Mann: The Discovery of Things: Aristotle's Categories and their Context . Pp. xii + 231. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2000. [REVIEW]Jonathan Barnes - 2001 - The Classical Review 51 (01):64-.
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  34. Finding Things Out. [REVIEW]Jonathan Barnes - 2001 - The Classical Review 51 (1):64-66.
  35. The Discovery of Things: Aristotle’s Categories & Their Context. [REVIEW]Monte Ransome Johnson - 2001 - Ancient Philosophy 21 (1):188-198.
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  36. Aristotle’s Categories 3b10-21.Daniel T. Devereux - 1998 - Ancient Philosophy 18 (2):341-352.
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  37. Basic concepts of formal ontology.Barry Smith - 1998 - In Nicola Guarino (ed.), Formal Ontology in Information Systems. IOS Press. pp. 19-28.
    The term ‘formal ontology’ was first used by the philosopher Edmund Husserl in his Logical Investigations to signify the study of those formal structures and relations – above all relations of part and whole – which are exemplified in the subject-matters of the different material sciences. We follow Husserl in presenting the basic concepts of formal ontology as falling into three groups: the theory of part and whole, the theory of dependence, and the theory of boundary, continuity and contact. These (...)
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  38. The Strategy of Aristotle’s Categories.Michael Wedin - 1997 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 79 (1):1-26.
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  39. Sulle categorie di Aristotele.Hermann Bonitz - 1995 - Milano: Vita E Pensiero.
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  40. Metaphysics, Dialectic and the Categories.Stephen Menn - 1995 - Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 100 (3):311 - 337.
    J'examine le statut et la fonction des Catégories dans la philosophie d'Aristote.Le traité n'appartient ni à la philosophie première, ni même à la philosophie tout court, mais à la dialectique. Il ne s'agit pas d'une « discussion dialectique » de l'être, mais plutôt de dialectique en tant que tel : ce traité forme un ensemble avec les Topiques, qui a pour but d'aider le questionneur dans un débat dialectique à décider si le terme donné peut tomber sous la définition proposée (...)
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  41. Chasing Aristotle’s Categories Down the Tree of Grammar.Michael R. Baumer - 1993 - Journal of Philosophical Research 18:341-449.
    This paper addresses the problem of the origin and principle of Aristotle’s distinctions among the categories. It explores the possibilities of reformulating and reviving the “grammatical” theory, generally ascribed first to Trendelenburg. The paper brings two new perspectives to the grammatical theory: that of Aristotle’s own theory of syntax and that of contemporary linguistic syntax and semantics. I put forth a provisional theory of Aristotle’s categories in which (1) I propose that the Categories sets forth a theory of lexical structure, (...)
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  42. On Aristotle's Categories by Ammonius; S. Marc Cohen; Gareth B. Matthews. [REVIEW]Sten Ebbesen - 1992 - Isis 83:643-644.
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  43. Aristotle's Categories and Porphyry by Christos Evangeliou. [REVIEW]Sten Ebbesen - 1991 - Isis 82:363-364.
  44. The Role of the Commentaries on Aristotle in the Teaching of Philosophy according to the Prefaces of the Neoplatonic Commentaries on the Categories.Ilsetraut Hadot - 1991 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy:175-189.
  45. John M. Dillon : Dexippus, On Aristotle Categories. Pp. 155. London: Duckworth, 1990. £24.Andrew Smith - 1991 - The Classical Review 41 (2):478-478.
  46. Aristotle's Categories and Porphyry. [REVIEW]Lawrence P. Schrenk - 1989 - Review of Metaphysics 43 (1):155-157.
    This new study, an updated version of the author's doctoral dissertation, is a detailed investigation of Porphyry's one extant commentary on Aristotle's Categories and Plotinus' critique of Aristotle's doctrine of categories in "On the Kinds of Being". Evangeliou's investigation is limited by the fact that Porphyry's work was written for the student in an elementary "question and answer" format, yet Evangeliou is still able to decipher his general approach to Aristotle, which is respectful and conciliatory. In stark contrast is Plotinus' (...)
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  47. Categorías aristotélicas y categorías intensionales.Gérold Stahl - 1989 - Theoria: Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia 4 (2):461-469.
    Did Aristotle, with his categories, classify only expressions or also something extralinguistic? In the second case his classification seems to be not exclusive, at least if the usual universes of discourse are considered. However, if we use certain enlarged universes, which may have more than one individual for each individual of the usual universes, we may construct exclusive general classifications that approach the aristotelian categories. The latter ones should then be considered second order classes that classify classes of individuals. If (...)
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  48. Naming the Categories: Back to Aristotle by Way of Whitehead.Marion Leathers Kuntz & Paul Grimley Kuntz - 1988 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 2 (1):30 - 47.
  49. Non-substantial Individuals in the Categories.Robert Heinaman - 1981 - Phronesis 26 (3):295-307.
    There is a dispute as to what sort of entity non-substantial individuals are in Aristotle's Categories. The traditional interpretation holds that non-substantial individuals are individual qualities, quantities, etc. For example, Socrates' white is an individual quality belonging to him alone, numerically distinct from (though possibly specifically identical with) other individual colors. I will refer to these sorts of entities as 'individual instances.' The new interpretation1 suggests instead that non-substantial individuals are atomic species such as a specific shade of white that (...)
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  50. A Defense of the Traditional Position Concerning Aristotle's Non-substantial Particulars.Herbert Granger - 1980 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 10 (4):593-606.
    In this paper I shall defend the traditional claim that Aristotle's nonsubstantial particulars discussed in the second chapter of the Categories are unsharable particulars against G. E. L. Owen's claim that they are sharable universals. I shall proceed by presenting first a sketch of the traditional position that makes explicit why it holds that non-substantial particulars are unsharable particulars. Secondly, I shall sketch Owen's position and recount how it differs in certain important respects from the traditional position. Thirdly, I shall (...)
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