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1 — 50 / 58
  1. added 2020-05-23
    Aristotle on Divine and Human Contemplation.Bryan Reece - 2020 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 7 (4):131–160.
    Aristotle’s theory of human happiness in the Nicomachean Ethics explicitly depends on the claim that contemplation (theôria) is peculiar to human beings, whether it is our function or only part of it. But there is a notorious problem: Aristotle says that divine beings also contemplate. Various solutions have been proposed, but each has difficulties. Drawing on an analysis of what divine contemplation involves according to Aristotle, I identify an assumption common to all of these proposals and argue for rejecting it. (...)
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  2. added 2020-03-01
    The Principle of Life: from Aristotelian Psyche to Drieschian Entelechy.Agustin Ostachuk - 2016 - Ludus Vitalis 24 (45):37-59.
    Is life a simple result of a conjunction of physico-chemical processes? Can be reduced to a mere juxtaposition of spatially determined events? What epistemology or world-view allows us to comprehend it? Aristotle built a novel philosophical system in which nature is a dynamical totality which is in constant movement. Life is a manifestation of it, and is formed and governed by the psyche. Psyche is the organizational principle of the different biological levels: nutritive, perceptive and intelective. Driesch's crucial experiment provided (...)
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  3. added 2020-01-31
    Aristotle's 'Cosmic Nose' Argument for the Uniqueness of the World.Tim O'Keefe & Harald Thorsrud - 2003 - Apeiron 36 (4):311 - 326.
    David Furley's work on the cosmologies of classical antiquity is structured around what he calls "two pictures of the world." The first picture, defended by both Plato and Aristotle, portrays the universe, or all that there is (to pan), as identical with our particular ordered world-system. Thus, the adherents of this view claim that the universe is finite and unique. The second system, defended by Leucippus and Democritus, portrays an infinite universe within which our particular kosmos is only one of (...)
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  4. added 2019-10-31
    Living Without a Soul: Why God and the Heavenly Movers Fall Outside of Aristotle’s Psychology.Caleb Cohoe - 2020 - Phronesis: A Journal for Ancient Philosophy 65.
    I argue that Aristotle's science of the soul only covers sublunary living things. Aristotle cannot properly ascribe soul to unmoved movers since they do not have any capacities that are distinct from their activities or any matter to be structured. Heavenly bodies do not have souls in the way that mortal living things do, because their matter is not subject to alteration or generation. These beings do not fit into the hierarchy of soul powers that Aristotle relies on to provide (...)
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  5. added 2019-09-22
    Cosmos in the Ancient World.Phillip Sidney Horky (ed.) - 2019 - Cambridge University Press.
    How did the ancient Greeks and Romans conceptualise order? This book answers that question by analysing the formative concept of kosmos in ancient literature, philosophy, science, art, and religion. This concept encouraged the Greeks and Romans to develop theories to explain core aspects of human life, including nature, beauty, society, politics, the individual, and what lies beyond human experience. Hence, Greek kosmos, and its Latin correlate mundus, are subjects of profound reflection by a wide range of important ancient figures, including (...)
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  6. added 2019-08-15
    Perennial Symmetry Arguments: Aristotle’s Heavenly Cosmology and Noether’s First Theorem.Ryan Miller - forthcoming - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association.
    Attempts to find perennial elements in Aristotle’s cosmology are doomed to failure because his distinction of sub- and supra-lunary realms no longer holds. More fruitful approaches to the contemporary importance of Aristotelian cosmology must focus on parities of reasoning rather than content. This paper highlights the striking parallels between Aristotle’s use of symmetry arguments in cosmology and instances of Noether’s First Theorem in contemporary physics. Both observe simple motion, find symmetries in that motion, argue from those symmetries to notions of (...)
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  7. added 2019-06-19
    Aristotle on Kosmos and Kosmoi.Monte Johnson - 2019 - In Phillip Horky (ed.), Cosmos in the Ancient World. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. pp. 74-107.
    The concept of kosmos did not play the leading role in Aristotle’s physics that it did in Pythagorean, Atomistic, Platonic, or Stoic physics. Although Aristotle greatly influenced the history of cosmology, he does not himself recognize a science of cosmology, a science taking the kosmos itself as the object of study with its own phenomena to be explained and its own principles that explain them. The term kosmos played an important role in two aspects of his predecessor’s accounts that Aristotle (...)
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  8. added 2019-06-06
    The Relation of the Sublunary Substances to God in Aristotle.Joan Franks - 1992 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 66:175.
  9. added 2019-06-06
    Aristotle’s Doctrine of the Uncreatedness and Indestructibility of the Universe.Anton-Hermann Chroust - 1978 - New Scholasticism 52 (2):268-279.
  10. added 2019-06-06
    On the Elements. Aristotle’s Early Cosmology. [REVIEW]S. R. - 1977 - Review of Metaphysics 30 (3):523-524.
    The author claims that parts of the De Caelo comprise a distinct work of Aristotle and can be taken as an early composition, earlier than the De Philosophia. The book is a careful philological and philosophical analysis of this text, and takes a position in regard to the authors who have commented on it. The doctrine of the text is contrasted to Plato’s cosmology, especially concerning the concepts of physics and aether. The text is also compared to Aristotle’s later teaching (...)
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  11. added 2019-06-06
    On the Elements: Aristotle's Early Cosmology. [REVIEW]W. E. W. StG Charlton - 1976 - The Classical Review 26 (1):133-134.
  12. added 2019-06-06
    A. P. Bos, "On the Elements: Aristotle's Early Cosmology". [REVIEW]Dorothea Frede - 1976 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 14 (2):227.
  13. added 2019-06-06
    Aristotle’s System of the Physical World: A Comparison with His Predecessors. [REVIEW]Joseph Owens - 1965 - New Scholasticism 39 (4):545-547.
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  14. added 2019-06-05
    David Ebrey, Ed. Theory and Practice in Aristotle’s Natural Science. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2015. Pp. Viii+261. $99.00. [REVIEW]Tiberiu Popa - 2016 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 6 (2):354-357.
  15. added 2019-06-05
    Aristotle and Corruptibility: A Discussion of Aristotle "De Caelo" I, Xii. Part II.C. J. F. Williams - 1966 - Religious Studies 1 (2):203.
    ἆρ' ∈ἰ kaì ⋯γ ∈´νητον … πρòς τò ɸθαρτόν, ⋯ϕ' ᾧΘ . Aristotle claims so far to have proved that the eternal is incorruptible and that it is ungenerated. He has still to prove the converse of each of these propositions, namely, that whatever is incorruptible is eternal and that whatever is ungenerated is eternal also. After putting the thesis in question form he gives a further definition of ⋯γ∈´νητος and ἄɸθαρτος in the parenthesis of 282 a 27–30. Unfortunately in (...)
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  16. added 2019-03-23
    Capacities and the Eternal in Metaphysics Θ.8 and De Caelo.Christopher Frey - 2015 - Phronesis 60 (1):88-126.
    _ Source: _Volume 60, Issue 1, pp 88 - 126 The dominant interpretation of Metaphysics Θ.8 commits Aristotle to the claim that the heavenly bodies’ eternal movements are not the exercises of capacities. Against this, I argue that these movements are the result of necessarily exercised capacities. I clarify what it is for a heavenly body to possess a nature and argue that a body’s nature cannot be a final cause unless the natural body possesses capacities that are exercised for (...)
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  17. added 2019-03-21
    Aristotle on Teleology.Monte Ransome Johnson - 2008 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    Monte Johnson examines one of the most controversial aspects of Aristiotle's natural philosophy: his teleology. Is teleology about causation or explanation? Does it exclude or obviate mechanism, determinism, or materialism? Is it focused on the good of individual organisms, or is god or man the ultimate end of all processes and entities? Is teleology restricted to living things, or does it apply to the cosmos as a whole? Does it identify objectively existent causes in the world, or is it merely (...)
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  18. added 2018-02-17
    On the Elements. Aristotle’s Early Cosmology.A. P. Bos - 1973 - Assen, Netherlands: Van Gorcum & Comp..
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  19. added 2018-01-08
    The Role of Aristotle’s Metaphysics 12.9.Dougal Blyth - 2016 - Méthexis 28 (1):76-92.
    Ch.9 of Metaph. 12 gives no support to the common view (against which I have argued elsewhere) that in ch.7 Aristotle identifies his Prime Mover not only as a god but also as an intellect. Rather, ch.9 approaches the divinity of intellect as a common belief (ἔνδοξον) from the Greek philosophical and poetic tradition (as at ch.7, 1072b23) that now requires dialectical testing. Here Aristotle initially establishes that there is a most active intellect (proposed ch.7, 1072b18–19: demonstrated ch.9, 1074b17–21, b28–9), (...)
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  20. added 2018-01-08
    Heavenly Soul in Aristotle.Dougal Blyth - 2015 - Apeiron 48 (4):1-39.
  21. added 2017-11-22
    A Crítica de Filopono de Alexandria à Tese Aristotélica da Eternidade do Mundo.Fátima Regina Rodrigues Évora - 2003 - Analytica 7 (1):15-47.
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  22. added 2017-09-03
    Helen S. Lang. The Order of Nature in Aristotle’s Physics: Place and the Elements. Xii + 324 Pp., Bibl., Index. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998. $80. [REVIEW]Monte Johnson - 2004 - Isis 95 (4):687-688.
  23. added 2017-04-03
    Why Continuous Motions Cannot Be Composed of Sub-Motions: Aristotle on Change, Rest, and Actual and Potential Middles.Caleb Cohoe - 2018 - Apeiron 51 (1):37-71.
    I examine the reasons Aristotle presents in Physics VIII 8 for denying a crucial assumption of Zeno’s dichotomy paradox: that every motion is composed of sub-motions. Aristotle claims that a unified motion is divisible into motions only in potentiality (δυνάμει). If it were actually divided at some point, the mobile would need to have arrived at and then have departed from this point, and that would require some interval of rest. Commentators have generally found Aristotle’s reasoning unconvincing. Against David Bostock (...)
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  24. added 2016-12-08
    Aristotle, The Timaeus, and Contemporary Cosmology.T. M. Robinson - 1993 - Philosophical Inquiry 15 (3-4):48-58.
  25. added 2016-12-08
    From Aristotle's Fixed Earth to the Mobile Aristotelian Earth.J. E. Bolzan - 1979 - Philosophical Inquiry 1 (2):154-159.
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  26. added 2016-12-05
    The Holistic Presuppositions of Aristotle's Cosmology.Mohan Matthen - 2001 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 20:171-199.
    Argues that Aristotle regarded the universe, or Totality, as a single substance with form and matter, and that he regarded this substance together with the Prime Mover as a self-mover.
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  27. added 2016-04-08
    Theory and Practice in Aristotle's Natural Science.David Ebrey (ed.) - 2015 - Cambridge University Press.
    Aristotle argued that in theory one could acquire knowledge of the natural world. But he did not stop there; he put his theories into practice. This volume of new essays shows how Aristotle's natural science and philosophical theories shed light on one another. The contributors engage with both biological and non-biological scientific works and with a wide variety of theoretical works, including Physics, Generation and Corruption, On the Soul, and Posterior Analytics. The essays focus on a number of themes, including (...)
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  28. added 2015-08-26
    The Actual Infinite as a Day or the Games.Pascal Massie - 2007 - Review of Metaphysics 60 (3):573-596.
    It is commonly assumed that Aristotle denies any real existence to infinity. Nothing is actually infinite. If, in order to resolve Zeno’s paradoxes, Aristotle must talk of infinity, it is only in the sense of a potentiality that can never be actualized. Aristotle’s solution has been both praised for its subtlety and blamed for entailing a limitation of mathematic. His understanding of the infinite as simply indefinite (the “bad infinite” that fails to reach its accomplishment), his conception of the cosmos (...)
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  29. added 2015-04-11
    From Aristotle’s Teleology to Darwin’s Genealogy: The Stamp of Inutility, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015 (Pdf: Contents, Introduction).Marco Solinas - 2015 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Starting with Aristotle and moving on to Darwin, Marco Solinas outlines the basic steps from the birth, establishment and later rebirth of the traditional view of living beings, and its overturning by evolutionary revolution. The classic framework devised by Aristotle was still dominant in the 17th Century world of Galileo, Harvey and Ray, and remained hegemonic until the time of Lamarck and Cuvier in the 19th Century. Darwin's breakthrough thus takes on the dimensions of an abandonment of the traditional finalistic (...)
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  30. added 2014-06-07
    Creationism and its Critics in Antiquity.David Sedley - 2008 - University of California Press.
    In this book, David Sedley examines this question and illuminates new historical perspectives on the pantheon of thinkers who laid the foundations of Western ...
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  31. added 2014-04-02
    Aristotle, the Direction Problem, and the Structure of the Sublunar Realm.Frederick M. Kronz - 1990 - Modern Schoolman 67 (4):247-257.
  32. added 2014-03-24
    Fire Above.Abraham P. Bos - 2002 - Ancient Philosophy 22 (2):303 - 317.
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  33. added 2014-03-09
    New Perspectives on Aristotle’s De Caelo.Alan Bowen & Christian Wildberg (eds.) - 2009 - Brill.
    New Perspectives on Aristotle'sDe caelo (Leiden) 139-161. Machamer, PK (1978) " Aristotle on Natural Place and Motion" Isis 69: 377-387. ...
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  34. added 2014-03-09
    Aristotle and Mathematics: Aporetic Method in Cosmology and Metaphysics.John J. Cleary - 1995 - E.J. Brill.
    This book examines Aristotle's critical reaction to the mathematical cosmology of Plato's Academy, and traces the aporetic method by which he developed his own ...
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  35. added 2014-03-07
    Aristóteles e o progresso da investigação científica: o caso do De caelo.Lucas Angioni - 2010 - Scientiae Studia 8 (3):319-338.
    This article examines three passages of De caelo in order to discuss Aristotle’s epistemological attitude towards the theories advanced by him and towards the possibility of progress in the scientific research of the celestial world. I argue that, although the possibility of progress in scientific investigation is not central in Aristotle’s reflections, progress is not ruled out either as impossible or as undesirable.
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  36. added 2014-03-06
    About Celestial Circulation: Averroes’ Tahafūt Al-Tahafūt and Aristotle’s De Caelo.Lisa Farooque - 2008 - Journal of Islamic Philosophy 4:21-38.
    For Averroes, celestial circulation is evidence of a divinely mandated rational universe. This paper follows Averroes’ account on cosmic contact between the eternal and the temporal, in Tahafūt al-tahafūt contra al-Ghazālī. It argues that the polemical perspective of the Tahafūt al-tahafūt frames Averroes’ appeal to Aristotle’s account of cosmic motion. Consequently, Averroes’ exceptional account of the universe contrasts Aristotle’s exemplary account of the mutual participation of intellect and nature. Their accounts of celestial circulation implicate the status of human nature conditioned (...)
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  37. added 2014-03-06
    Aristotle's Rewinding Spheres: Three Options and Their Difficulties.István M. Bodnár - 2005 - Apeiron 38 (4):257 - 275.
    Aristotle asserts at 1073b10-13 that he intends to give in Metaphysics XII.8 a definite conception about the multitude of the divine transcendent entities, which function as the movers of the celestial spheres. In order to do so, he describes several celestial theories. First Eudoxus’s, then the modifications of this theory propounded by Callippus, and finally his own suggestion, the introduction of yet further spheres which integrate the celestial spheres into a single overarching scheme. For this, after explaining the spheres providing (...)
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  38. added 2013-08-28
    Aristotle De Caelo Aristotelis De Caelo libri IV. Recognovit brevique adnotatione critica instruxit D. J. Allan. (Scr. Class. Bibl. Oxon.) Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1936. Cloth, 7s. 6d. [REVIEW]W. K. C. Guthrie - 1937 - The Classical Review 51 (01):15-16.
  39. added 2013-05-13
    Aristotle, Copernicus, Galileo.Pierre Conway - 1949 - New Scholasticism 23 (1):38-61.
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  40. added 2013-04-22
    Review. Aristotle: On the Heavens I and II. S Leggatt.T. Brennan - 1997 - The Classical Review 47 (2):282-284.
  41. added 2013-04-18
    La Prétendue Intuition de Dieu Dans le De Coelo d'Aristote.Richard Bodeüs - 1990 - Phronesis 35 (1):245-257.
  42. added 2013-04-18
    Aristotle’s Great Clock.James Bogen & J. E. McGuire - 1986 - Philosophy Research Archives 12:387-448.
    This paper offers a detailed account of arguments in De Caelo I by which Aristotle tried to demonstrate the necessity of the perpetual existence and the perpetual rotation of the cosmos. On our interpretation, Aristotle’s arguments are naturalistic. Instead of being based (as many have thought) on rules of logic and language, they depend, we argue, on natural science theories about abilities (δυνάμεις), e.g., to move and to change, which things have by nature and about the conditions under which these (...)
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  43. added 2013-04-15
    De Mundo Giovanni Reale: Aristotele: Trattato sul Cosmo per Alessandro, traduzione con testo greco a fronte, introduzione, commento e indici. Pp. xv + 358. Naples: Loffredo, 1974. Cloth, L. 9,000. [REVIEW]Jonathan Barnes - 1977 - The Classical Review 27 (01):40-43.
  44. added 2013-04-14
    De Caelo. Aristotle - 2005 - Clarendon Press.
    This new translation of _De Caelo_ fits seamlessly with other volumes in the New Hackett Aristotle series, enabling Anglophone readers to study Aristotle’s work in a way previously not possible. The Introduction describes the book that lies ahead, explaining what it is about, what it is trying to do, how it goes about doing it, and what sort of audience it presupposes. Sequentially numbered endnotes provide the information most needed at each juncture, while a detailed Index indicates the places where (...)
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  45. added 2013-04-14
    On the Heavens.W. K. C. Aristotle & Guthrie - 1939 - Heinemann Harvard University Press.
  46. added 2013-04-03
    Topsy-Turvy World: Circular Motion, Contrariety, and Aristotle’s Unwinding Spheres.Christopher Isaac Noble - 2013 - Apeiron 46 (4):1-28.
    In developing his theory of aether in De Caelo 1, Aristotle argues, in DC 1.4, that one circular motion cannot be contrary to another. In this paper, I discuss how Aristotle can maintain this position and accept the existence of celestial spheres that rotate in contrary directions, as he does in his revision of the Eudoxan theory in Metaphysics 12.8.
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  47. added 2013-04-03
    Aristotle and Copernican Revolutions. Williams - 1991 - Phronesis 36 (3):305-312.
  48. added 2013-04-03
    A New Text of Aristotle's de Mundo Aristotelis Qui Fertur Libellus De Mundo. By W. L. Lorimer. Pp. 121. Paris: Société d'Edition 'Les Belles Lettres,' 1933. Paper, 50 Francs. [REVIEW]W. D. Ross - 1933 - The Classical Review 47 (05):182-183.
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  49. added 2013-04-01
    Aristotle's God and the Authenticity of De Mundo : An Early Modern Controversy.Jill Kraye - 1990 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 28 (3):339-358.
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  50. added 2013-04-01
    Aristote Et la Question du Monde. Essai Sur le Contexte Cosmologique Et Anthropologique de L'Ontologie.David R. Lachterman - 1989 - Review of Metaphysics 43 (2):387-390.
    This is the most noteworthy and, potentially, most fructifying Aristotelian study in recent decades. Unlike many other vues d'ensemble, it is neither a reconstruction of Aristotle's putative "development," nor an analytical rehabilitation of sedimented "doctrines"; rather, Brague's work is an engagement with the original evidence generating and sustaining Aristotle's discourses on the human, the worldly, and the divine. This engagement is carried through in a special register: Aristote et la question du monde is a surrogate for the book on Aristotle (...)
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