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  1. added 2020-05-23
    Aristotle on Divine and Human Contemplation.Bryan Reece - 2020 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 7 (4):131–160.
    Aristotle’s theory of human happiness in the Nicomachean Ethics explicitly depends on the claim that contemplation (theôria) is peculiar to human beings, whether it is our function or only part of it. But there is a notorious problem: Aristotle says that divine beings also contemplate. Various solutions have been proposed, but each has difficulties. Drawing on an analysis of what divine contemplation involves according to Aristotle, I identify an assumption common to all of these proposals and argue for rejecting it. (...)
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  2. added 2020-05-04
    Minimum Circumstances Necessary for Virtue and Happiness.Benjamin Hole - 2020 - Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 76 (1):237-260.
    What are the worst conditions under which someone can be virtuous and happy? In this paper, I argue that a minimum threshold of favorable circumstances is necessary for moral virtue and human flourishing or happiness. Stoic and Aristotelian traditions make different and important claims about the role of external circumstances in our moral lives. Retrieving the ancient dispute benefits contemporary ethics. For one, the relevance of external circumstances is an important question for the development of present-day virtue ethics. For another, (...)
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  3. added 2020-04-10
    Wishing for Fortune, Choosing Activity: Aristotle on External Goods and Happiness.Eric Brown - 2006 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 22 (1):221-256.
    Aristotle's account of external goods in Nicomachean Ethics I 8-12 is often thought to amend his narrow claim that happiness is virtuous activity. I argue, to the contrary, that on Aristotle's account, external goods are necessary for happiness only because they are necessary for virtuous activity. My case innovates in three main respects: I offer a new map of EN I 8-12; I identify two mechanisms to explain why virtuous activity requires external goods, including a psychological need for external goods; (...)
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  4. added 2020-04-04
    Are There Really Two Kinds of Happiness in Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics?Bryan C. Reece - 2020 - Classical Philology 115 (2):270-280.
    Aristotle appears to claim at Nicomachean Ethics 10.8, 1178a9 that there are two kinds of happy life: one theoretical, one practical. This claim is notoriously problematic and does not follow from anything that Aristotle has said to that point. However, the apparent claim depends on supplying 'happy' or 'happiest' from the previous sentence, as is standard among translators and interpreters. I argue for an alternative supplement that commits Aristotle to a much less problematic and unexpected position and permits a wider (...)
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  5. added 2019-10-18
    Eudaimonia and Neltiliztli: Aristotle and the Aztecs on the Good Life.Lynn Sebastian Purcell - 2017 - APA Newsletter on Hispanic/Latino Issues in Philosophy 16 (2):10-21.
    This essay takes a first step in comparative ethics by looking to Aristotle and the Aztec's conceptions of the good life. It argues that the Aztec conception of a rooted life, neltiliztli, functions for ethical purposes in a way that is like Aristotle's eudaimonia. To develop this claim, it not only shows just in what their conceptions of the good consist, but also in what way the Aztecs conceived of the virtues (in qualli, in yectli).
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  6. added 2019-06-13
    Notes From Narnia (on the Human Body).Samuel Baker - 2019 - Think 18 (52):81-86.
    What is a human body? Some reasons are given for thinking that, in the primary case, it is a body that is both of and suitable to a rational animal.
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  7. added 2019-06-13
    What is ‘the Best and Most Perfect Virtue’?Samuel H. Baker - 2019 - Analysis 79 (3):387-393.
    We can clarify a certain difficulty with regard to the phrase ‘the best and most perfect virtue’ in Aristotle’s definition of the human good in Nicomachean Ethics I 7 if we make use of two related distinctions: Donnellan’s attributive–referential distinction and Kripke’s distinction between speaker’s reference and semantic reference. I suggest that Aristotle is using the phrase ‘the best and most perfect virtue’ attributively, not referentially, and further that even though the phrase may refer to a specific virtue (semantic reference), (...)
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  8. added 2019-06-11
    Lei, amizade e participação política em Aristóteles após o biological turn: Reflexões preliminares sobre um novo paradigma hermenêutico.Daniel Simão Nascimento - 2015 - Archai: Revista de Estudos Sobre as Origens Do Pensamento Ocidental 15:59-70.
    Este artigo tem quatro objetivos. O primeiro deles é mostrar que dois debates contemporâneos de grande importância para a filosofia política aristotélica – a saber, o debate acerca do laço que liga ou deve ligar os cidadãos de uma comunidade política e o debate acerca da importância da participação política no que diz respeito ao alcance da felicidade – devem ser compreendidos em conjunto com o mo- vimento hermenêutico que chamamos hoje de biological turn. Como veremos, a maneira como respondemos (...)
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  9. added 2019-06-06
    Loving the Fine: Virtue and Happiness in Aristotle's Ethics. By Anna Lännström. Pp. 145, Notre Dame, IN, University of Notre Dame Press, 2006, $27.50. [REVIEW]Louis Groark - 2012 - Heythrop Journal 53 (4):701-704.
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  10. added 2019-06-06
    The Activity of Happiness In Aristotle’s Ethics.Gary M. Gurtler - 2003 - Review of Metaphysics 56 (4):801-834.
    This article examines happiness as an activity, modeled on pleasure in NE 10, 1-5. Aristotle is not proposing a choice, but defining the formal nature of happiness. Contemplation, as the activity of wisdom, constitutes happiness in the strict and formal sense. It has all the attributes of happiness, highest, most continuous, most pleasant, most self-sufficient, leisured, and an end in itself. Practical virtues are formally secondary, as including elements outside the activity of the best part and having leisure as their (...)
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  11. added 2019-06-06
    Stephen A. White, "Sovereign Virtue: Aristotle on the Relation Between Happiness and Virtue". [REVIEW]Paula Gottlieb - 1995 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 33 (2):333.
  12. added 2018-06-30
    Intelecto en acción: Aristóteles y la filosofía como forma de vida.Alejandro Farieta - 2018 - Bogotá, Colombia: Editorial Uniagustiniana.
    This book faces the problem of how is it possible to conceive Aristotelian philosophy as a way of life, and not as a discipline or profession. If there are any of his texts where this concerns are to be found, it is in his practical treatises, in which he defends a philosophy of human affairs. However, Aristotle insists on the fact that philosophy, in its greatest expression, is the first philosophy, to which the idea of contemplation seems to refer to, (...)
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  13. added 2018-06-12
    Luck in Aristotle's Physics and Ethics.Monte Johnson - 2015 - In Devin Henry & K. Nielson (eds.), Bridging the Gap between Aristotle's Science and Ethics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 254-275.
    I discuss how Aristotle’s formulation of the problem of moral luck relates to his natural philosophy. I review well-known passages from Nicomachean Ethics I/X and Eudemian Ethics I/VII and Physics II, but in the main focus on EE VII 14 (= VIII 2). I argue that Aristotle’s position there (rejecting the elimination of luck, but reducing luck so far as possible to incidental natural and intelligent causes) is not only consistent with his treatment of luck in Physics II, but is (...)
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  14. added 2018-06-12
    Protreptic Aspects of Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics.Monte Johnson & D. S. Hutchinson - 2014 - In Ronald Polansky (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 383-409.
    We hope to show that the overall protreptic plan of Aristotle's ethical writings is based on the plan he used in his published work Protrepticus (Exhortation to Philosophy), by highlighting those passages that primarily offer hortatory or protreptic motivation rather than dialectical argumentation and analysis, and by illustrating several ways that Aristotle adapts certain arguments and examples from his Protrepticus. In this essay we confine our attention to the books definitely attributable to the Nicomachean Ethics (thus excluding the common books).
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  15. added 2018-05-14
    Depression and the Emotions: An Argument for Cultivating Cheerfulness.Derek McAllister - 2018 - Philosophia 46 (3):771-784.
    In this paper, I offer an argument for cultivating cheerfulness as a remedy to sadness and other emotions, which, in turn, can provide some relief to certain cases of depression. My thesis has two tasks: first, to establish the link between cheerfulness and sadness, and second, to establish the link between sadness and depression. In the course of accomplishing the first task, I show that a remedy of cultivating cheerfulness to counter sadness is supported by philosophers as diverse as Thomas (...)
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  16. added 2017-12-08
    Aristotle on Self-Sufficiency, External Goods, and Contemplation.Marc Gasser-Wingate - 2020 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 102 (1):1-28.
    Aristotle tells us that contemplation is the most self-sufficient form of virtuous activity: we can contemplate alone, and with minimal resources, while moral virtues like courage require other individuals to be courageous towards, or courageous with. This is hard to square with the rest of his discussion of self-sufficiency in the Ethics: Aristotle doesn't generally seek to minimize the number of resources necessary for a flourishing human life, and seems happy to grant that such a life will be self-sufficient despite (...)
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  17. added 2017-11-01
    My Other Myself: Aristotle and the Value of Friendship.Richard Oxenberg - manuscript
    What constitutes a true human-to-human relationship? What is its importance and value for human life? These are the questions I explore in this talk on Aristotle's philosophy of friendship, originally presented as part of Boston University's Core Curriculum lecture series.
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  18. added 2017-10-18
    Eudaimonia as an Activity in Nicomachean Ethics 1. 8–12.Robert Heinaman - 2007 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 33:221-253.
  19. added 2017-10-16
    The Metaphysics of Goodness in the Ethics of Aristotle.Samuel Baker - 2017 - Philosophical Studies 174 (7):1839-1856.
    Kraut and other neo-Aristotelians have argued that there is no such thing as absolute goodness. They admit only good in a kind, e.g. a good sculptor, and good for something, e.g. good for fish. What is the view of Aristotle? Mostly limiting myself to the Nicomachean Ethics, I argue that Aristotle is committed to things being absolutely good and also to a metaphysics of absolute goodness where there is a maximally best good that is the cause of the goodness of (...)
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  20. added 2017-08-28
    A Phronesis (Prudência) como condição necessária para a realização da eudaimonia (felicidade).Ianna Cerqueira Santos - 2014 - Dissertation, UFSC, Brazil
  21. added 2017-08-14
    Aristóteles desvelado por Martha Nussbaum: As raízes trágicas da ética e a condição humana em Hannah Arendt.Harley Juliano Mantovani - 2015 - Theoria: Revista Eletrônica de Filosofia 7 (18):221-250.
    Neste artigo, tivemos o objetivo de analisar como o racionalismo ético limita a ética. Frente a este propósito, expomos a fonte trágica da ética de Aristóteles, para quem a ética não é ciência e não tem uma fonte metafísica. A revelação de Aristóteles mostrou como o seu pensamento ético, por ultrapassar o racionalismo filosófico, inaugura uma corrente de pensamento moral cuja modéstia é mais adequada à fragilidade da condição humana.
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  22. added 2017-08-13
    A eudaimonía e a conexão das virtudes na Ética a Nicômaco.Roberto Robinson Bezerra Catunda - 2011 - Dissertation, Universidade Estadual Do Ceará (UECE), Brazil
    O objetivo dessa dissertação é discutir alguns conceitos que dizem respeito ao estatuto da eudaimonía, tendo como pressuposto que o texto da Ética a Nicômaco possa por si só esclarecer como ela é entendida por Aristóteles. Na minha hipótese, as discussões metodológicas estabelecidas no livro I servem como orientações suficientes para esclarecer a relação entre a realização da eudaimonía e o exercício das virtudes da alma, sem com isso haver a necessidade de que recorramos a outras obras de Aristóteles. Em (...)
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  23. added 2017-06-09
    Protrepticus. Aristotle, Monte Ransome Johnson & D. S. Hutchinson - manuscript
    A new translation and edition of Aristotle's Protrepticus (with critical comments on the fragments) -/- Welcome -/- The Protrepticus was an early work of Aristotle, written while he was still a member of Plato's Academy, but it soon became one of the most famous works in the whole history of philosophy. Unfortunately it was not directly copied in the middle ages and so did not survive in its own manuscript tradition. But substantial fragments of it have been preserved in several (...)
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  24. added 2017-06-02
    Aristotle's Virtue Ethics.John Bowin - forthcoming - In A Companion to World Literature. Hoboken, New Jersey: Wiley-Blackwell.
    Aristotle, though not the first Greek virtue ethicist, was the first to establish virtue ethics as a distinct philosophical discipline. His exposition of the subject in his Nicomachean Ethics set the terms of subsequent debate in the European and Arabic traditions by proposing a set of plausible assumptions from which virtue ethics should proceed. His conception of human well-being and virtue as well as his brand of ethical naturalism were influential from antiquity through the Middle Ages and continue to be (...)
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  25. added 2017-03-29
    Aristotle on Happiness and the Good Life.Desh Raj Sirswal - manuscript
    Aristotle was the last, and the most influential of the Greek philosophers. Aristotle studied philosophy as well as different branches of natural sciences. In fact, he had a keen interest in the world of experience and is the founder of at least two sciences: (1) Logic and (2) Biology. Aristotle’s system of philosophy falls into the fivefold division of Logic, metaphysics, physics, ethics and aesthetics. Aristotle talks about the ultimate good being eudaimonia – a good life, a flourishing life, a (...)
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  26. added 2017-03-13
    Purpose as a Moral Virtue for Flourishing.Hyemin Han - 2015 - Journal of Moral Education 44 (3):291-309.
    Positive psychology has significantly influenced studies in the fields of moral philosophy, psychology and education, and scholars in those fields have attempted to apply its ideas and methods to moral education. Among various theoretical frameworks, virtue ethics is most likely to connect positive psychology to moral educational studies because it pursues eudaimonia (flourishing). However, some virtue ethicists have been concerned about whether the current mainstream concept of positive psychology can apply directly to moral education because it focuses on subjective aspects (...)
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  27. added 2017-02-21
    Contemplation and Action Within the Context of the Kalon: A Reading of the Nicomachean Ethics.Michael Wiitala - 2009 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 83:173-182.
    In the Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle seems to take it for granted that the contemplative man is morally virtuous. Yet in certain passages he suggests that morally virtuous actions can impede contemplation. In this paper I examine the relationship between contemplation and morally virtuous action in Aristotle’s ethics. I argue that, when understood within the context of the motivating power of the kalon, contemplation and morally virtuous action are related to one another in such a way that one cannot be contemplative (...)
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  28. added 2017-01-06
    The Limits of Eudaimonia in the Nicomachean Ethics.Schwartz Daniel - 2016 - Journal of Greco-Roman Studies 55 (3):35-52.
    In Book I of his Nicomachean Ethics (NE), Aristotle defines happiness, or eudaimonia, in accordance with an argument he makes regarding the distinctive function of human beings. In this paper, I argue that, despite this argument, there are moments in the NE where Aristotle appeals to elements of happiness that don’t follow from the function argument itself. The place of these elements in Aristotle’s account of happiness should, therefore, be a matter of perplexity. For, how can Aristotle appeal to elements (...)
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  29. added 2016-12-31
    Review of D. Scott, Levels of Argument: A Comparative Study of Plato's Republic and Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics (Oxford, 2015). [REVIEW]Samuel H. Baker - 2015 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews:online.
  30. added 2016-12-31
    Review of C.D.C. Reeve, Aristotle on Practical Wisdom: Nicomachean Ethics VI. [REVIEW]Samuel H. Baker - 2015 - Philosophy in Review 35 (2):106-108.
  31. added 2016-09-26
    Contemplative Friendship in Nicomachean Ethics.Daniel P. Maher - 2012 - Review of Metaphysics 65 (4):765-794.
    In Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle’s two forms of human happiness correspond to two forms of human virtue and, I argue, to two forms of virtuous friendship. I propose that the most properly human form of happiness is achieved in contemplative friendship. This friendship is a genuinely contemplative approximation of divine life and still a specifically human life consisting in discursivespeech with others. Contemplative friends wish the good to one another as human beings and thus fulfill what friendship is more completely than (...)
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  32. added 2016-09-19
    Virtue and Knowledge: An Introduction to Ancient Greek Ethics.William J. Prior - 1991 - Routledge.
    Originally published in 1991, this book focuses on the concept of virtue, and in particular on the virtue of wisdom or knowledge, as it is found in the epic poems of Homer, some tragedies of Sophocles, selected writings of Plato, Aristotle, and the Stoic and Epicurean philosophers. The key questions discussed are the nature of the virtues, their relation to each other, and the relation between the virtues and happiness or well-being. This book provides the background and interpretative framework to (...)
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  33. added 2016-08-07
    A delimitação do conceito de eudaimonia em Ethica Nicomachea I.7.Angelo Antonio Pires de Oliveira - 2014 - Filogenese 7 (1):1-14.
  34. added 2016-08-02
    O Devido como Garantidor da Excelência: Análises a partir do Livro V da Ethica Nicomachea.Felipe Alves da Silva - 2016 - Clareira: Revista de Filosofia da Região Amazônica 3 (1):56-86.
    O presente trabalho tem por finalidade analisar, a partir do livro V da obra Ethica Nicomachea, se a justiça poderia ser tomada como um meio que irá auxiliar os cidadãos a desenvolver plenamente as suas virtudes. Buscar-se-á fundamentar que é através da justiça que os bons cidadãos seriam formados, bem como o bom caráter seria cultivado. Analisar-se-á, também, ainda que minimamente, o que Aristóteles entende de fato por justiça, de que o justo seria dar a cada um o que lhe (...)
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  35. added 2016-04-19
    Eudaimonia e Contemplação na Ética Nicomaquéia de Aristóteles.Clarisse Goulart Nunes - 2012 - Dissertation, Universidade Federal Do Rio Grande Do Sul
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  36. added 2016-04-19
    Conhecer, legislar e educar: A filosofia das coisas humanas na Ética Nicomaquéia de Aristóteles.Priscilla Tesch Spinelli - 2010 - Dissertation, Universidade Federal Do Rio Grande Do Sul
  37. added 2016-04-16
    Felicidade Controversa.Fernando Gazzoni - 2012 - Dissertation, Universidade de São Paulo
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  38. added 2016-02-29
    A Walk Through Aristotle's Ethics.Valentin Muresan - 2014 - Editura Universitatii din Bucuresti.
    This is a detailed commentary on the Nicomachean Ethics. It is a fresh approach to Aristotle's masterpiece, by proposing a comprehensivist interpretation of happiness. Furthermore it offers an original perspective on the dialectical method, establish relations between virtue, continence and neuroscience and uses the "predicables" to determine sistematicaly the path to happiness.
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  39. added 2016-02-26
    The Crossroads of Norm and Nature: Essays on Aristotle's Ethics and Metaphysics.May Sim - 1995 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
  40. added 2015-11-20
    The Concept of Well-Being.Stephen M. Campbell - 2016 - In Guy Fletcher (ed.), Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Well-Being. Routledge.
  41. added 2015-11-04
    The Concept of Ergon: Towards An Achievement Interpretation of Aristotle's 'Function Argument'.Samuel H. Baker - 2015 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 48:227-266.
    In Nicomachean Ethics 1. 7, Aristotle gives a definition of the human good, and he does so by means of the “ ergon argument.” I clear the way for a new interpretation of this argument by arguing that Aristotle does not think that the ergon of something is always the proper activity of that thing. Though he has a single concept of an ergon, Aristotle identifies the ergon of an X as an activity in some cases but a product in (...)
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  42. added 2015-07-11
    Pursuits of Wisdom: Six Ways of Life in Ancient Philosophy From Socrates to Plotinus.John M. Cooper - 2012 - Princeton University Press.
    In "Pursuits of Wisdom," John Cooper brings this crucial question back to life. This marvelous book will shape the way we think about and engage with ancient philosophical traditions.
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  43. added 2015-06-27
    On Happiness and Contemplation in Aristotle's Thought.Victor Eugen Gelan - manuscript
  44. added 2014-08-28
    Other Selves.Efren A. Alverio - 2010 - Kritike 4 (1):199-218.
    Aristotle regarded highly the concept of friendship. For him, friendship—being one of the virtues just like truth, justice, courage, etc.—is something that affects not just human behavior but even the state’s as well . However, the English language has set a limit to its use and thus diminished its meaning. While the Greek for friendship, which is φιλια can be translated as love, when using the English language one cannot say that as A and B are friends, it must be (...)
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  45. added 2014-07-17
    The Morality of Happiness.Julia Annas - 1993 - Oxford University Press.
    Ancient ethical theories, based on the notions of virtue and happiness, have struck many as an attractive alternative to modern theories. But we cannot find out whether this is true until we understand ancient ethics--and to do this we need to examine the basic structure of ancient ethical theory, not just the details of one or two theories. In this book, Annas brings together the results of a wide-ranging study of ancient ethical philosophy and presents it in a way that (...)
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  46. added 2014-04-02
    Aristotle on Happiness and Death.Rory Goggins - 2012 - Southwest Philosophy Review 28 (1):63-71.
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  47. added 2014-04-02
    Plato and Aristotle on Human Happiness.Jeff Mason & Claude Pearson - 1998 - The Philosophers' Magazine 2 (2):25-26.
  48. added 2014-04-02
    La Question de L’Eudaimonia Dans L’Éthique a Nicomaque D’Aristote.Ingeborg Schüssler - 1992 - Études Phénoménologiques 8 (16):79-102.
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  49. added 2014-03-31
    The Supremely Happy Life in Aristotle's "Nicomachean Ethics".Howard J. Curzer - 1991 - Apeiron 24 (1):47 - 69.
  50. added 2014-03-27
    Virtue and Reason in Plato and Aristotle.A. W. Price - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    A.W. Price explores the views of Plato and Aristotle on how virtue of character and practical reasoning enable agents to achieve eudaimonia--the state of living or acting well. He provides a full philosophical analysis and argues that the perennial question of action within human life is central to the reflections of these ancient philosophers.
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