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  1. Escepticismo, metafísica y argumentación. Estudios sobre filosofía griega antigua.Daniel Vazquez - 2023 - Mexico City: NUN.
    Este libro recopila siete estudios que discuten algunas de las aportaciones de Aristóteles, Platón y Sexto Empírico en temas de argumentación filosófica, tiempo, causalidad y escepticismo radical. Algunas de las preguntas que abordo incluyen: ¿Qué papel debe tener la metáfora y la analogía en el discurso filosófico? ¿Cuáles son los presupuestos éticos de una discusión filosófica abierta y productiva y por qué a veces fracasa? ¿Cuál es el alcance y qué se debe responder ante el escepticismo radical? ¿Es el tiempo (...)
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  2. Qui imperitus est vestrum, primus calculum omittat. Aristotelis sophistici elenchi 1 in the Boethian Tradition.Leone Gazziero - 2023 - Ad Argumenta 4:75-118.
    The prologue of the Sophistici elenchi is as close an Aristotelian text gets to dealing with language as a subject matter in its own right, only in reverse. Language and its features bear consideration to the extent that they account for some major predicaments discursive reasoning is prone to, both as a separate and as a common endeavour. That being said, the linguistic pitfalls that trick us into thinking that whatever is the case for words and word-compounds is also the (...)
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  3. Getting Your Sources Right: What Aristotle Didn’t Say.James Mahon - 1999 - In Researching and Applying Metaphor. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 69-80.
    In this chapter I argue that writers on metaphor have misunderstood Aristotle on metaphor. Aristotle is not an elitist about metaphor and does not consider metaphors to be merely ornamental. Rather, Aristotle believes that metaphors are ubiquitous and believes that people can express themselves in a clearer and more attractive way through the use of metaphors and that people learn and understand things better through metaphor. He also distinguishes between the use of metaphor and the coinage of metaphor, and believes (...)
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  4. Kategorije 10, 13b27-35: logička forma singularnih subjektno-predikatnih rečenica [Categories 10, 13b27-35: Logical form for Singular Predications].Igor Martinjak - 2021 - Nova Prisutnost : Časopis Za Intelektualna I Duhovna Pitanja 19 (2):373-388.
    The possibility of formal representation of Aristotle’s discussion about singular predication in Categories 10, 13b27-35 is investigated through three symbolic idioms: the first-order language with identity, with and without definitive description, and through the languages of free logics. I show that such representations are not fully adequate. According to the first option, we are committing Aristotle with some (meta)logical implications he is not willing to accept. According to the second option, we are burdening Aristotle with Russell’s theory of names. Finally, (...)
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  5. Why Are Accidents Included under Being per se?Elliot Polsky - forthcoming - Nova et Vetera.
    In In V Metaphysics, lec. 9, Aquinas distinguishes between “being by accident” (ens per accidens) and “being by itself” (ens per se) and includes the nine accidental categories under the latter. But isn’t substance a being per se while accidents are, by definition, accidental beings? Several authors—including Ralph McInerny, Paul Symington, and Greg Doolan—have offered explanations of this strange classification. Drawing on an overlooked parallel text in the Posterior Analytics commentary and on Aquinas’s critique of Avicenna’s understanding of accidental denominatives, (...)
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  6. Getting Your Sources Right: What Aristotle Didn’t Say.James Mahon - 1999 - In Researching and Applying Metaphor. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 69-80.
    In this chapter I argue that writers on metaphor have misunderstood Aristotle on metaphor. Aristotle is not an elitist about metaphor and does not consider metaphors to be merely ornamental. Rather, Aristotle believes that metaphors are ubiquitous and believes that people can express themselves in a clearer and more attractive way through the use of metaphors and that people learn and understand things better through metaphor. He also distinguishes between the use of metaphor and the coinage of metaphor, and believes (...)
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  7. Experimenting with every American king.Poppy Mankowitz - 2023 - Natural Language Semantics 31 (4):349-387.
    The standard contemporary semantics for ‘every’ predict the truth of occurrences of sentences with restrictors that denote the empty set, such as ‘Every American king lives in New York’. The literature on empty restrictors has been concerned with explaining a particular violation of this prediction: many assessors consider empty-restrictor sentences to be odd rather than valued, and they are apparently more likely to do so when such sentences include determiners like ‘every’ as opposed to those like ‘no’. Empirical investigation of (...)
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  8. Contraintes disciplinaires – anciennes et modernes – de l’interprétation logique des Catégories d’Aristote.Gazziero Leone - 2019 - In Véronique Brière & Juliette Lemaire (eds.), Qu'est-ce qu'une catégorie?: interprétations d'Aristote. Louvain-la-Neuve: Peeters. pp. 9-59.
    L. Gazziero, « “Οἰκείως τῇ λογικῇ πραγματείᾳ” (Simplicii in Aristotelis categorias commentarium, 12.11). Contraintes disciplinaires – anciennes et modernes – de l’interprétation logique des Catégories d’Aristote », dans V. Brière et J. Lemaire (éd.), Qu’est-ce qu’une catégorie ? Interprétations d’Aristote, Leuven, Peeters, 2019, p. 9-59 [ISBN 9789042936621] -/- In addition to understanding the very notion of « category » according to its different Aristotelian contexts, the first order of business of an archaeology of Aristotle’s categories is to inquire into its (...)
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  9. Word, thought, and object in Aristotle's De int. 14 and Metaphysics Γ3.Colin Guthrie King - 2021 - Studia Philosophica 80:53–73.
    The discussion of the Principle of Non-Contradiction (PNC) in Aristotle’s Metaphysics Γ is usually taken to include three ‘versions’ of the principle: an ontological, psychological, and logical one. In this article I develop an interpretation of Metaphysics Γ3 and a parallel text, De interpretatione 14, in order to show that these texts are concerned with two related but different principles: a version of the Principle of Identity, and a corollary to this, which concerns the ability to accept two ‘opposite’ items (...)
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  10. The Semantics of Divine Esse in Boethius.Elliot Polsky - forthcoming - Nova et Vetera.
    Boethius identifies God both with esse ipsum and esse suum. This paper explains Boethius's general semantic use of "esse" and the application of this use to God. It questions the helpfulness of attributing to Boethius "existence" words and argues for a more robust role in Boethius’s thought for Hilary of Poitiers’s and Augustine’s exegeses of Exodus 3:14-15 than has been acknowledged in recent scholarship.
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  11. Aristotle on Comparison.Elena Comay del Junco - 2022 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 61:103-142.
    Many contemporary philosophers hold that comparison requires a common, monistic ‘covering value’, and Aristotle is often described as a forerunner of this view. This paper reconsiders that claim. First, its textual warrant is substantially weaker than has been thought. Philosophically, moreover, Aristotle’s theory of non-synonymous predication allows for comparisons to be made using the special kind of non-synonymous terms that he calls pros hen legomenon, literally those ‘said with reference to a single thing.’ His favourite example is ‘healthy’ as said (...)
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  12. Greek rhetoricians and the enthymeme - (j.) fredal the enthymeme. Syllogism, reasoning, and narrative in ancient greek rhetoric. Pp. VIII + 217. Pennsylvania: The pennsylvania state university press, 2020. Cased, us$89.95. Isbn: 978-0-271-08613-2. [REVIEW]Owen Goldin - 2022 - The Classical Review 72 (1):79-81.
  13. O MODELO EXPLANATÓRIO-CAUSAL DE ARISTÓTELES EM SEGUNDOS ANALÍTICOS II.8-10 E O CASO DAS SUBSTÂNCIAS HILEMÓRFICAS.Daniela Fernandes Cruz - 2021 - In Jeferson Forneck, Daniel Peres dos Santos, João Francisco Cortés Bustamante & Isis Hochmann de Freitas (eds.), XXI Semana Acadêmica Do PPG Em Filosofia da PUCRS Vol. 1. Porto Alegre: Editora Fundação Fênix. pp. 45-59.
    Nos Segundos Analíticos II.8-10, Aristóteles apresenta um modelo investigativo de descoberta da essência pela causa a partir de uma estrutura triádica: a demonstração silogística. Esse modelo explanatório-causal é colocado em prática em casos de processos naturais (e.g. eclipse, trovão) e, apesar de mencionadas, as substâncias sensíveis (e.g. homem) não são concretamente analisadas – algo que só se consolida nos livros centrais da Metafísica (mais especificamente, em Z.17) a partir da análise hilemórfica. Além disso, em Segundos Analíticos II.9, Aristóteles apresenta uma (...)
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  14. Ὁ ἄπειρος πρῶτος τὴν ψῆφον βαλέτω. Leaving No Pebble Unturned in Sophistici elenchi, 1.Leone Gazziero - 2021 - In Gazziero Leone (ed.), Le langage. Lectures d’Aristote. Leuven: Peeters. pp. 241-343.
    Relying on evidence from fifteen epigraphic collections and sixty-odd ancient sources as well as discussing a literature of over five hundred titles, the essay’s highly unorthodox conclusions are a case in point of the micrological ideal of achieving novelty on any given subject by way of transcribing and studying first-hand all relevant materials – edited and unedited alike. The paper’s ambition was to shed new light on one of the most intriguing analogies of the whole Aristotelian corpus, namely the comparison (...)
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  15. Aristote et le langage. Mode d’emploi.Leone Gazziero - 2021 - In Gazziero Leone (ed.), Le langage. Lectures d’Aristote. Leuven: Peeters. pp. 1-8.
    Quelque nombreuses et quelque influentes qu'elles soient par ailleurs, les vues d'Aristote sur le langage se caractérisent à la fois par leur hétérogénéité et par leur marginalité. Sans faire nulle part du langage et de la signification l'objet d'une investigation autonome et méthodique, Aristote multiplie les remarques et les digressions à leur sujet, que ce soit dans ses écrits d'éthique et de politique ou dans ses traités d'histoire et de philosophie naturelle, ou encore dans ses manuels de dialectique, de poétique (...)
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  16. Commentary on the Posterior Analytics of Aristotle.Thomas Aquinas - 1949 - Albany, NY, USA: Magi Books. Edited by Fabian R. Larcher.
    Original publisher: London: Burns, Oates, and Washbourne, 1934.
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  17. Megaric Metaphysics.Dominic Bailey - 2012 - Ancient Philosophy 32 (2):303-321.
    I examine two startling claims attributed to some philosophers associated with Megara on the Isthmus of Corinth, namely: Ml. Something possesses a capacity at t if and only if it is exercising that capacity at t. M2. One can speak of a thing only by using its own proper A6yor;. In what follows, I will call the conjunction of Ml and M2 'Megaricism' .1 The lit­ erature on ancient philosophy contains several valuable discussions of Ml and M2 taken individually .2 (...)
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  18. Relativity, categories and principles in the diuisio aristotelea 67M/32DL.Roberto Granieri - 2022 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 142:204-218.
    The Diuisio Aristotelea 67M/32DL draws a distinction between two categories of beings, per se and relatives. I defend three main theses. First, that the relation of dependence characterizing the members of the latter category is modal and symmetrical in nature and, accordingly, the per se-relatives contrast cannot be equivalent to the substance-accidents contrast. Second, that the type of relativity relevant to this diuisio is both ontological and semantic in nature (but with different emphases depending on the version of the diuisio (...)
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  19. Systems of Predication. Aristotle’s Categories in Topics, I, 9.Roberto Granieri - 2016 - Documenti E Studi Sulla Tradizione Filosofica Medievale 27:1-18.
    In this paper I investigate Aristotle’s account of predication in Topics I 9. I argue for the following interpretation. In this chapter Aristotle (i) presents two systems of predication cutting across each other, the system of the so-called four ‘predicables’ and of the ten ‘categories’, in order to distinguish them and explore their mutual relationship. I propose a semantic interpretation of the relationship between them. According to this reading, every proposition formed through a predicable constitutes at the same time a (...)
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  20. La distinción aristotélica entre enérgeia y kı́nesis comprendida de modo intensional.Matı́as Von Dem Bussche - 2019 - Mutatis Mutandis: Revista Internacional de Filosofía 14.
    El siguiente artı́culo intenta defender la tesis de que la distinción aristotélica entre enérgeia y kı́nesis debe ser comprendida de modo intensional (en contraposición a una lectura extensional), tomando como punto de partida su célebre aparición en Met IX 6. Sobre la base de la identificación del problema acerca del cual trata dicho pasaje, se toma en consideración otras apariciones de la distinción en Met IX 8, en la EE, en la EN y en otros textos, en orden a documentar, (...)
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  21. Sullogismos and Sullogizesqai in Aristotle's Organon.James Duerlinger - 1969 - American Journal of Philology 90 (3):320.
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  22. The Aristotelian Tradition in Ancient Rhetoric.Friedrich Solmsen - 1941 - American Journal of Philology 62 (1):35.
  23. Sullogismoi ec Upoqesews in Aristotle.Paul Shorey - 1889 - American Journal of Philology 10 (4):460.
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  24. Greek Foundations of Traditional Logic.Phillip de Lacy & Ernst Kapp - 1944 - American Journal of Philology 65 (3):305.
  25. Filosofía vs. erística según platón Y aristóteles: Acerca de la distinción entre estar problematizado Y hablar Por el gusto de hablar.Graciela E. Marcos - 2020 - Argos 1 (38):7-29.
    En este artículo pretendo echar luz sobre la distinción entre filosofía y erística en Platón y Aristóteles, dirigiendo la atención a la noción de aporía. En la sección I, sobre la base de un examen de las ocurrencias de eristikós en Menón, intento mostrar que Sócrates aparece estrechamente conectado al erístico, quien suele ser presentado como su oponente más peligroso. En la sección II, analizo la taxonomía de Aristóteles de los opositores al principio de no-contradicción en Metafísica IV, con el (...)
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  26. Understanding Mediated Predication in Aristotle’s Categories.Patrick Grafton-Cardwell - 2021 - Ancient Philosophy 41 (2):443-462.
    I argue there are two ways predication relations can hold according to the Categories: they can hold directly or they can hold mediately. The distinction between direct and mediated predication is a distinction between whether or not a given prediction fact holds in virtue of another predication fact’s holding. We can tell Aristotle endorses this distinction from multiple places in the text where he licenses an inference from one predication fact’s holding to another predication fact’s holding. The best explanation for (...)
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  27. False ἔvδοξα and fallacious argumentation.Colin Guthrie King - 2012 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 15 (1):185-199.
    Aristotle determines eristic argument as argument which either operates upon the basis of acceptable premisses and merely give the impression of being deductive, or argument which truly is deductive but operates upon the basis of premisses which seem to be acceptable, but are not. I attempt to understand what Aristotle has in mind when he says that someone is deceived into accepting premisses which seem to be acceptable but which are really not, and how this disqualifies such arguments from being (...)
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  28. The Ontological Status of Human Speech in Aristotle‘s "Categories".Pavol Labuda - 2019 - Filosoficky Casopis 67 (6):877-894.
    The subject of this paper is the issue of human speech in Aristotle, especially in his work Categories. Its primary goal is to elaborate an interpretation of Aristotle’s statements about human speech as a quantity (Cat. 4b20–b39, 5a15–b2) that would allow them to fit reasonably into the whole of Aristotle’s theory of language. The structure of the paper is as follows. In the first part a certain approach to the question of the reconstruction of Aristotle’s theory of language is proposed. (...)
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  29. K. J. J. Hintikka: On the Interpretation of ‘De Interpretatione’ XII–XIII; J. M. E. Moravcsik: Being and Meaning in the ‘Sophist’. (Acta Philosophica Fennica, xiv.) Pp. 78. Helsinki: Akateeminen Kirjakauppa, 1962. Paper. [REVIEW]D. W. Hamlyn - 1963 - The Classical Review 13 (3):343-343.
  30. Dorothea Frede: Aristoteles und die ‘Seeschlacht’: das Problem der Contingentia Futura in De Interpretatione 9. (Hypomnemata, 27.) Pp. 129. Göttingen: Vandenhoeck and Ruprecht, 1970. Paper DM. 24. [REVIEW]Pamela M. Huby - 1972 - The Classical Review 22 (2):272-272.
  31. Aristotle’s Two Accounts of Relatives in Categories 7.Matthew Duncombe - 2015 - Phronesis 60 (4):436-461.
    AtCategories7, 6a36-7 Aristotle defines relatives, but at 8a13-28 worries that the definition may include some substances. Aristotle introduces a second account of relatives to solve the problem. Recent commentators have held that Aristotle intends to solve the extensional adequacy worry by restricting the extension of relatives. That is, R2 counts fewer items as relative than R1. However, this cannot explain Aristotle’s attitude to relatives, since he immediately returns to using R1. I propose a non-extensional reading. R1 and R2 do not (...)
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  32. Wayne N. Thompson: Aristotle's Deduction and Induction: Introductory Analysis and Synthesis. Pp. 114. Amsterdam: Rodopi N.V., 1975. Paper, fl. 20. [REVIEW]Pamela M. Huby - 1977 - The Classical Review 27 (1):125-125.
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  33. Jaakko Hintikka: Time and necessity: Studies in Aristotle's Theory of Modality. Pp. ix + 225. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1973. Cloth, £5·50. [REVIEW]W. E. W. St G. Charlton - 1976 - The Classical Review 26 (2):280-280.
  34. Klaus Schickert: Die Form der Widerlegung beim frühen Aristoteles. (Zetemata, 65.) Pp. xiv + 111. Munich: C. H. Beck, 1977. Paper, DM. 32. [REVIEW]Pamela M. Huby - 1979 - The Classical Review 29 (2):319-319.
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  35. Aristotle on Scientific Knowledge - R. D. McKirihan: Principles and Proofs: Aristotle's Theory of Demonstrative Science. Pp. xiv + 340. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 1992. Cased, £35. [REVIEW]J. D. G. Evans - 1994 - The Classical Review 44 (1):84-85.
  36. J. Allen: Inference from Signs: Ancient Debates about the Nature of Evidence. Pp. xi + 279. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2001. Cased, £30. ISBN: 0-19-825094-0. [REVIEW]Jonathan Barnes - 2002 - The Classical Review 52 (2):375-376.
  37. Crivelli Aristotle on Truth. Pp. xii + 340. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004. Cased, £50, US$85. ISBN: 0-521-82328-5. [REVIEW]Jean-Baptiste Gourinat - 2006 - The Classical Review 56 (1):65-66.
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  38. Dire et penser dans le principe psychologique de non-contradiction d'Aristote.Fabien Schang - 2005 - Public@Tions Electroniques de Philosophi@ Scienti@E.
    Un paralogisme semble commis dans la démonstration par Aristote du principe psychologique de non-contradiction : à partir d’un principe performatif d’assertion (dire quelque chose, c’est le croire), une approche moderne nous incline à prétendre qu’Aristote présuppose une transparence référentielle des contextes opaques de croyance afin de corréler les versions psychologique et logique. Nous tenterons de restituer la preuve du principe (I). Au moyen de la formalisation moderne, nous appliquerons cette explication à quelques paradoxes (II). Nous en conclurons la nature de (...)
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  39. Aristotle on Use of Homonymy in the Rhetoric.Mikołaj Domaradzki - 2018 - Ancient Philosophy 38 (2):333-346.
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  40. Logic teaching at the University of Oxford from the Sixteenth to the early Eighteenth Century.E. Jennifer Ashworth - 2015 - Noctua 2 (1-2):24-62.
    This paper considers the nature of the changes that took place in logic teaching at the University of Oxford from the beginning of the sixteenth century, when students attended university lectures on Aristotle’s texts as well as studying short works dealing with specifically medieval developments, to the beginning of the eighteenth century when teaching was centred in the colleges, the medieval developments had largely disappeared, and manuals summarizing Aristotelian logic were used. The paper also considers the reasons for these changes, (...)
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  41. Aristotle on Secondary Substance.John Robert Mahlan - 2019 - Apeiron 52 (2):167-197.
    At the beginning of Categories 5, Aristotle distinguishes between two kinds of substance: primary substance and secondary substance. Primary substances include particular living organisms, inanimate objects, and their parts. Secondary substances are the species and genera of these. This distinction is unique to the Categories, which raises the question of why Aristotle treats species and genera as substances. I argue that Aristotle has two distinct reasons for doing so, and contrast my interpretation with recent alternatives. On my view, species and (...)
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  42. Aristotle on Principles as Elements.Marko Malink - 2017 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 53.
  43. Pseudo-Plato on Names.Francesco Ademollo - 2017 - Phronesis 62 (3):255-273.
    The pseudo-Platonic Definitions seems to ascribe to ὄνοµα, ‘name’, the function of signifying two kinds of predicate. This is problematic, and I propose an emendation of the text, arguing that a definition of ῥῆµα, ‘verb’, has fallen out.
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  44. Empty Negations and Existential Import in Aristotle.Phil Corkum - 2018 - Apeiron 51 (2):201-219.
    Aristotle draws what are, by our lights, two unusual relationships between predication and existence. First, true universal affirmations carry existential import. If ‘All humans are mortal’ is true, for example, then at least one human exists. And secondly, although affirmations with empty terms in subject position are all false, empty negations are all true: if ‘Socrates’ lacks a referent, then both ‘Socrates is well’ and ‘Socrates is ill’ are false but both ‘Socrates is not well’ and ‘Socrates is not ill’ (...)
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  45. Zoran Bodies of Speech: Text and Textuality in Aristotle. Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2014. Pp. xv + 256. £47.99. 9781443860628. [REVIEW]Kleanthis Mantzouranis - 2016 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 136:288-289.
  46. There is Beauty Here, Too: Aristotle's Rhetoric for Science.John Poulakos & Nathan Crick - 2012 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 45 (3):295-311.
    In Aristotle's biological treatise, On the Parts of Animals, one finds a rare and unexpected burst of rhetorical eloquence. While justifying the study of “less valued animals,” he erupts into praise for the study of all natural phenomena and condemns the small-mindedness of those who trivialize its worth. Without equal in Aristotle's remaining works for its rhetorical quality, it reveals the otherwise coolheaded researcher as a passionate seeker of truth and an unabashed lover of natural beauty. For Aristotle, rhetoric not (...)
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  47. Aristotle on Truth-Bearers.David Charles & Michail Peramatzis - 2016 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 50:101-141.
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  48. A Method of Modal Proof in Aristotle.Jacob Rosen & Marko Malink - 2012 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 42:179-261.
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  49. Syllogism, Demonstration, and Definition in Aristotle's Topics and Posterior Analytics.James Allen - 2011 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 40:63-90.
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  50. The Principle of Bivalence in De interpretatione 4.Francesco Ademollo - 2010 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 38:97-113.
    In De int. 9 Aristotle argues that some declarative sentences are neither true nor false. This raises the problem of how we should understand the words of ch. 4, which introduces the declarative sentence as ‘that in which being true or being false holds’. In this paper I remove the contradiction by arguing that in ch. 4 Aristotle does not intend to claim that *all* declarative sentences are either true or false, but rather that *only* they are either true or (...)
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