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  1. Phainomenon and Logos in Aristotle's Ethics.J. Hatab Lawrence - 2013 - In Phenomenology and Virtue Ethics. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 10-30.
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  2. Making a Necessity of Virtue: Aristotle and Kant on Virtue.David O. Brink - 2000 - Philosophical Review 109 (3):428-434.
    Recent moral philosophy has seen a revival of interest in the concept of virtue, and with it a reassessment of the role of virtue in the work of Aristotle and Kant. This book brings that reassessment to a new level of sophistication. Nancy Sherman argues that Kant preserves a notion of virtue in his moral theory that bears recognizable traces of the Aristotelian and Stoic traditions, and that his complex anthropology of morals brings him into surprising alliance with Aristotle. She (...)
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  3. Das Ethos der Mesotes. By H. Schilling. Pp. Iv + 103. (Heidelberger Abhandlungen Zur Philosophic Und Ihrer Geschichte, 22.) Tübingen: Mohr, 1930. Paper, M. 6. [REVIEW]W. D. Ross - 1931 - The Classical Review 45 (2):88-88.
  4. Family Friendship in Aristotle’s Ethics.Elizabeth Belfiore - 2001 - Ancient Philosophy 21 (1):113-132.
  5. What It Takes to Be Great: Aristotle and Aquinas on Magnaminity.David A. Horner - 1998 - Faith and Philosophy 15 (4):415-444.
    The revival of virtue ethics is largely inspired by Aristotle, but few---especially Christians---follow him in seeing virtue supremely exemplified in the “magnanimous” man. However, Aristotle raises a matter of importance: the character traits and type of psychological stance exemplified in those who aspire to acts of extraordinary excellence. I explore the accounts of magnanimity found in both Aristotle and Aquinas, defending the intelligibility and acceptability of some central elements of a broadly Aristotelian conception of magnanimity. Aquinas, I argue, provides insight (...)
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  6. A Great Philosopher’s Not So Great Account of Great Virtue: Aristotle’s Treatment of ‘Greatness of Soul’.Howard J. Curzer - 1990 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 20 (4):517-537.
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  7. Aristotle, Virtue and the Mean. [REVIEW]Paul Schollmeier - 1999 - Dialogue 38 (3):610-613.
    The ancient Greeks present a moral outlook which is not without considerable difficulty for contemporary philosophers. This difficulty has origins which may go back as far as the Renaissance, but we can surely trace its sources at least to Descartes. We tend to think that we had best use a moral theory to address problems of morality. What better way to determine how we ought to conduct ourselves than to define, once and for all, some basic principles of action! If (...)
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  8. Review of Howard J. Curzer, Aristotle and the Virtues. [REVIEW]Marta Jimenez - 2014 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2014 (04).
  9. Modern Greatness of Soul in Hume and Smith.Andrew J. Corsa - 2015 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 2.
    I contend that Adam Smith and David Hume offer re-interpretations of Aristotle’s notion of greatness of soul, focusing on the kind of magnanimity Aristotle attributes to Socrates. Someone with Socratic magnanimity is worthy of honor, responds moderately to fortune, and is virtuous—just and benevolent. Recent theorists err in claiming that magnanimity is less important to Hume’s account of human excellence than benevolence. In fact, benevolence is a necessary ingredient for the best sort of greatness. Smith’s “Letter to Strahan” attributes this (...)
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  10. In Philosophia, Quæmoralis Dicitur, Tractanda, Quæam Sit Præipue Aristotelicædisciplinævirtus? Dissertatio Latina Cancellari Præio Dignata Et in Theatro Oxoniensi Habita, Die Jun. Viimo. 1815.Charles Daubeny - 1815 - [Printed by S. Collingwood].
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  11. Aristotele e le virtù sociali: EN IV, 1126b 1-1128b 9.María Silvia Vaccarezza - 2012 - Acta Philosophica 21 (2):309 - 336.
    In EN II, 1108 9-1108 b10 e più estesamente in EN IV, 1126b 10-1128b 9 Aristotele analizza tre virtù (amichevolezza, sincerità e arguzia) che, coinvolgendo il linguaggio e il senso dell’umorismo, riguardano quell’aspetto fondamentale della natura umana che è la socialità, al punto che pare giustificato l’utilizzo dell’etichetta “virtù sociali” per riferirsi ad esse. Tali virtù, infatti, rappresentano le eccellenze nell’ambito dei rapporti sociali non connotati da affetto e amicizia, ma caratterizzati da un legame ben definito, sufficiente a giustificare l’emergere (...)
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  12. Le Ragioni Del Contingente: La Saggezza Pratica Tra Aristotele E Tommaso D'Aquino.Maria Silvia Vaccarezza - 2012 - Orthotes.
    Questo lavoro è diviso in due parti: una monografica in cui viene indagata l’autentica posizione aristotelica in merito allo statuto della phronesis e della conoscenza morale, e l'altra in cui si offre una nuova traduzione del VI libro ...
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  13. Mencius' Jun-Zi, Aristotle's Megalopsuchos, & Moral Demands to Help the Global Poor.Sean Walsh - 2013 - Comparative Philosophy 4 (1):103-129.
    Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE Normal 0 false false false EN-US ZH-TW X-NONE It is commonly believed that impartial utilitarian moral theories have significant demands that we help the global poor, and that the partial virtue ethics of Mencius and Aristotle do not. This ethical partiality found in these virtue ethicists has been criticized, and some have suggested that the partialistic virtue ethics of Mencius and Aristotle are parochial (i.e., overly narrow in their scope of concern). I (...)
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  14. Affective Conflict and Virtue: Hume's Answer to Aristotle.Kate Abramson - 2013 - In Jon Miller (ed.), The Reception of Aristotle's Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
  15. Virtue and Reason in Plato and Aristotle.A. W. Price - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    A.W. Price explores the views of Plato and Aristotle on how virtue of character and practical reasoning enable agents to achieve eudaimonia--the state of living or acting well. He provides a full philosophical analysis and argues that the perennial question of action within human life is central to the reflections of these ancient philosophers.
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  16. Aristotle: Nicomachean Ethics, Books Ii--Iv: Translated with an Introduction and Commentary.C. C. W. Taylor (ed.) - 2006 - Oxford University Press.
    This volume, which is part of the Clarendon Aristotle Series, offers a clear and faithful new translation of Books II to IV of Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, accompanied by an analytical commentary focusing on philosophical issues. In Books II to IV, Aristotle gives his account of virtue of character in general and of the principal virtues individually, topics of central interest both to his ethical theory and to modern ethical theorists. Consequently major themes of the commentary are connections on the one (...)
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  17. Mεγαλοπρέπεια and Mεγαλοψυχία in Aristotle.J. Cook Wilson - 1902 - The Classical Review 16 (04):203-.
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  18. Functionalism and the Moral Virtues in Aristotle’s Ethics.Michael J. White - 1979 - International Studies in Philosophy 11:49-57.
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  19. >“Virtue Makes the Goal Right”: Virtue and Phronesis in Aristotle’s Ethics.Jessica Moss - 2011 - Phronesis 56 (3):204-261.
    Aristotle repeatedly claims that character-virtue “makes the goal right“, while Phronesis is responsible for working out how to achieve the goal. Many argue that these claims are misleading: it must be intellect that tells us what ends to pursue. I argue that Aristotle means just what he seems to say: despite putative textual evidence to the contrary, virtue is (a) a wholly non-intellectual state, and (b) responsible for literally supplying the contents of our goals. Furthermore, there are no good textual (...)
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  20. Moral Knowledge and the Acquisition of Virtue in Aristotle's "Nicomachean" and "Eudemian Ethics".Alex John London - 2001 - Review of Metaphysics 54 (3):553 - 583.
    IN BOTH THE EUDEMIAN ETHICS AND THE NICOMACHEAN ETHICS, Aristotle says that the aim of ethical inquiry is a practical one; we want to know what virtue is so that we may become good ourselves and thereby do well and be happy. By classifying ethical inquiry as a practical endeavor, Aristotle is rejecting a view that he attributes to Socrates according to which ethics is a kind of theoretical science. In theoretical sciences, such as geometry or astronomy, the knowledge of (...)
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  21. Does Aristotle Have a Consistent Account of Vice?Thomas C. Brickhouse - 2003 - Review of Metaphysics 57 (1):3 - 23.
    HOW ARE WE TO UNDERSTAND THE PSYCHOLOGY OF VICE in Aristotle’s ethics? As many commentators have noted, it is by no means obvious that Aristotle’s scattered remarks about vice really add up to a coherent account. In several places Aristotle clearly assigns the leading role in the explanation of vicious action to reason. We see this, for example, in the unequivocal claim that acts expressing intemperance are “in accordance with choice”. This is important, in part because it provides a basis (...)
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  22. The Unity of the Moral Virtues in Aristotle's "Nicomachean Ethics".Elizabeth Telfer - 1989 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 90:35 - 48.
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  23. Aristotle's Crowning Virtue.Neil Cooper - 1989 - Apeiron 22 (3):191 - 205.
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  24. The Practical Import of Aristotle's Doctrine of the Mean.J. E. Tiles - 1992 - Apeiron 25 (4):1 - 14.
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  25. Contemplation, the Noble, and the Mean: The Standard of Moral Virtue in Aristotle's Ethics.Thomas Tuozzo - 1992 - Apeiron 25 (4):129 - 154.
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  26. Aristotle's 'Nameless' Virtues.Paula Gottlieb - 1994 - Apeiron 27 (1):1 - 15.
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  27. Aristotle on Habituation.Nathan Bowditch - 2008 - Ethical Perspectives 15 (3):309-342.
    This paper explores Aristotle ’s discussion in the Nicomachean Ethics of the relation between the rational and nonrational parts of the soul to make sense of his claim that “we cannot be fully good without prudence [practical wisdom], or prudent without virtue of character.” The significance of this interpretive project for an understanding of the Nicomachean Ethics as a whole cannot be understated. While Aristotle ’s conception of human excellence clearly incorporates both cognitive and conative capacities – which he calls (...)
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  28. Books and Becoming Good: Demonstrating Aristotle's Theory of Moral Development in the Act of Reading.Amanda Cain - 2005 - Journal of Moral Education 34 (2):171-183.
    In the Nicomachean ethics, Aristotle sets down a scattered and fractional account of the development of moral virtue within young people. Philosopher Martha Nussbaum defends Aristotle's neglect of a systematic account of moral development and argues that more complex expressions of character?building, such as learning to expose oneself to proper desires, feelings, pleasures and pains, are better illustrated through drama or literature than through philosophy. In this vein, the author draws upon literary thinkers J.B. Kerfoot, Sven Birkerts and Wayne C. (...)
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  29. Aristotle on Dividing the Soul and Uniting the Virtues.Paula Gottlieb - 1994 - Phronesis 39 (3):275-290.
  30. What is “the Mean Relative to Us” in Aristotle's Ethics?”.Lesley Brown - 1997 - Phronesis 42 (1):77-93.
  31. How to Distinguish Aristotle's Virtues.Marguerite Deslauriers - 2002 - Phronesis 47 (2):101-126.
    This paper considers the distinctions Aristotle draws (1) between the intellectual virtue of "phronêsis" and the moral virtues and (2) among the moral virtues, in light of his commitment to the reciprocity of the virtues. I argue that Aristotle takes the intellectual virtues to be numerically distinct hexeis from the moral virtues. By contrast, I argue, he treats the moral virtues as numerically one hexis, although he allows that they are many hexeis 'in being'. The paper has three parts. In (...)
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  32. Aristotelian Piety.Sarah Broadie - 2003 - Phronesis 48 (1):54-70.
    Aristotle seems to omit discussing the virtue piety. Such an omission should surprise us. Piety is not covertly dealt with under the more general heading of justice, nor under that of philia. But piety does make a veiled appearance at NE X.8, 1179a22-32. Many interpreters have refused to take this passage seriously, but this is shown to be a mistake.
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  33. The Price of Virtue.Anne Margaret Baxley - 2007 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 88 (4):403–423.
    Aristotle famously held that there is a crucial difference between the person who merely acts rightly and the person who is wholehearted in what she does. He captures this contrast by insisting on a distinction between continence and full virtue. One way of accounting for the important difference here is to suppose that, for the genuinely virtuous person, the requirements of virtue "silence" competing reasons for action. I argue that the silencing interpretation is not compelling. As Aristotle rightly saw, virtue (...)
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Aristotle: Friendship
  1. On the Normative Consequences of Virtue and Utility Friendships in Aristotle.Daniel Simão Nascimento - 2017 - Revista Latinoamericana de Filosofia 43 (2):263-284.
    In this article, I use the expanded hohfeldian model presented by Wenar to argue that, according to Aristotle's theory of friendship, every bond of friendship that is based on utility or virtue creates duties and hohfeldian incidents between those who are friends. In section 1, I provide a quick presentation of Hohfeld's work and of Wenar's hohfeldian model. In section 2, I present my thesis about the creation of certain hohfeldian incidents and certain duties in virtue and utility friendships as (...)
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  2. Lei, amizade e participação política em Aristóteles após o biological turn: Reflexões preliminares sobre um novo paradigma hermenêutico.Daniel Simão Nascimento - 2015 - Archai: Revista de Estudos Sobre as Origens Do Pensamento Ocidental 15:59-70.
    Este artigo tem quatro objetivos. O primeiro deles é mostrar que dois debates contemporâneos de grande importância para a filosofia política aristotélica – a saber, o debate acerca do laço que liga ou deve ligar os cidadãos de uma comunidade política e o debate acerca da importância da participação política no que diz respeito ao alcance da felicidade – devem ser compreendidos em conjunto com o mo- vimento hermenêutico que chamamos hoje de biological turn. Como veremos, a maneira como respondemos (...)
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  3. My Other Myself: Aristotle and the Value of Friendship.Richard Oxenberg - manuscript
    What constitutes a true human-to-human relationship? What is its importance and value for human life? These are the questions I explore in this talk on Aristotle's philosophy of friendship, originally presented as part of Boston University's Core Curriculum lecture series.
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  4. Freiheit und Freundschaft in Axel Honneths Recht der Freiheit.Philipp Schwind & Sebastian Muders - 2017 - Philosophy and Society 28 (3):454-474.
    In Axel Honneths Recht der Freiheit (RF) dienen persönliche Beziehungen, zu welchen Honneth neben Familien- und Liebesbeziehungen auch die Freundschaft zählt, der Verwirklichung einer „besondere[n], schwer zu charakterisierende[n] Form von Freiheit“ (RF 233). Diese Behauptung fügt sich ein in die Kernthese des Rechts der Freiheit. Demnach vermochte es die „Freiheit im Sinne der Autonomie des Einzelnen“ innerhalb unzähliger „Vorstellung[en] vom Guten“ als einzige, die moderne Gesellschaft nachhaltig zu prägen, wohingegen alle anderen Werte, die in der Moderne wirkmächtig geworden sind, als (...)
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  5. Aristotle on Happiness and the Good Life.Desh Raj Sirswal - manuscript
    Aristotle was the last, and the most influential of the Greek philosophers. Aristotle studied philosophy as well as different branches of natural sciences. In fact, he had a keen interest in the world of experience and is the founder of at least two sciences: (1) Logic and (2) Biology. Aristotle’s system of philosophy falls into the fivefold division of Logic, metaphysics, physics, ethics and aesthetics. Aristotle talks about the ultimate good being eudaimonia – a good life, a flourishing life, a (...)
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  6. Friendship and Filial Piety: Relational Ethics in Aristotle and Early Confucianism.Tim Connolly - 2012 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 39 (1):71-88.
    This article examines the origins of and philosophical justifications for Aristotelian friendship and early Confucian filial piety. What underlying assumptions about bonds between friends and family members do the philosophies share or uniquely possess? Is the Aristotelian emphasis on relationships between equals incompatible with the Confucian regard for filiality? As I argue, the Aristotelian and early Confucian accounts, while different in focus, share many of the same tensions in the attempt to balance hierarchical and familial associations with those between friends (...)
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  7. Derrida, Friendship and the Transcendental Priority of the ‘Untimely’.Jack Reynolds - 2010 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 36 (6):663-676.
    This article examines Derrida’s insistence on the contretemps that breaks open time, paying particular attention to Politics of Friendship and the way in which this book envisages the ‘untimely’ as both interrupting, and making possible, friendship. Although I suggest that Derrida’s temporal deconstruction of the Aristotelian distinction between utility and ‘perfect’ friendships is convincing, I also argue that Derrida’s own account of friendship is itself touched by time, in the peculiar sense of ‘touched’ that connotes affected and wounded. Derrida’s work (...)
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  8. Aristotle’s Philosophy of Friendship. [REVIEW]Pamela M. Huby - 1997 - Ancient Philosophy 17 (1):247-249.
  9. Les Rapports D’Échange Selon Aristote. Éthique À Nicomaque V Et VIII-IX.Gilles Campagnolo & Maurice Lagueux - 2004 - Dialogue 43 (3):443-469.
    ABSTRACT: This article proposes an interpretation of the chapters of the Nicomachean Ethics concerning exchange and friendship. Rejecting approaches where Aristotle anticipates modern labour or need-based theories of value, the article claims that those notions of labour and need are required for a satisfactory interpretation of the most obscure passages of Book V Finally, Aristotle’s texts on exchange and friendship are related in such a way that the latter, since it is free from any political considerations, allows us to better (...)
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  10. The Self in Aristotle’s Ethics.Stephen A. Calogero - 1998 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 5 (2/3):85-95.
    This paper examines Aristotle’s treatment of friendship and self-love in Books VIII and IX of the Nicomachean Ethics. The purpose is to explore what Aristotle means by self, and his understanding of why selves become, engaged in benevolent relationships with others. Some discussion of Aristotle’s influence on Kierkegaard helps to bring out the significance of Aristotle’s insights about the self. Aristotle explains how the self’s movement toward actuality grounds friendship and benevolence. True friendship and all endeavors to “produce” good, derive (...)
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  11. In the Place Beyond Utility and Pleasure.Julia Walton - 2015 - Questions: Philosophy for Young People 15:14-16.
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  12. Approaching Others: Aristotle on Friendship’s Possibility.Bradley Bryan - 2009 - Political Theory 37 (6):754-779.
    The essay sheds light on Aristotle's understanding of friendship and its relation to political life. The author challenges the usual view that Aristotle postulates three distinct kinds of friendship. Instead the author argues that Aristotle understood there to be only one kind of friendship, and that other "friendships" were to Aristotle "unfinished" and thus not friendship at all. Aristotle shows that the relation between friendship and politics is grounded in friendship's possibility for human beings, and not as something cherished for (...)
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  13. Liberal Citizenship and Civic Friendship.Jason A. Scorza - 2004 - Political Theory 32 (1):85-108.
    Aristotle famously argues that friendship can serve as a normative model for the practice of citizenship, and this view has been widely accepted by neo-Aristotelians. Liberals, however, are quick to reject both Aristotle's view of friendship and his view of citizenship. Does this mean that the concept of friendship is politically irrelevant for liberalism? This essay suggests, on the contrary, that the concept of friendship is far from obsolete, even for liberals. Specifically, communicative constraints derived from the norms of friendship, (...)
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  14. Friendship and Teaching Philosophy in Nicomachean Ethics IX.1.Daniel P. Maher - 2013 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 87:271-283.
    In Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle discusses the relation between teachers and students during his treatment of “non-uniform friends.” These friends exchange goods differing in kind . Such friendships depend on the needs of the friends, and we are invited to ask whether some need induces a philosopher to teach a not-yet-philosophical student. In this paper I argue that the philosophical teacher does not approach his pupil out of need nor as he would approach a contemplative friend who is an equal. The (...)
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  15. A Benevolência Na Definição Aristotélica Da Amizade.Konrad Utz - 2009 - Hypnos. Revista Do Centro de Estudos da Antiguidade 22:35-60.
    Aristóteles distingue três tipos de amizades: a amizade da virtude, do prazer e da utilidade. Todas essas exigem que os amigos se amem reciprocamente e que seu amor não fique escondido ao outro. Porém, há outro critério da amizade referente ao qual o texto parece ser vago: a benevolência, que em primeira instância, faz parte da definição geral da amizade. Vou referir-me, principalmente, aos capítulos III e IV do oitavo livro da Ética a Nicômaco, oferecendo uma interpretação de algumas passagens (...)
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  16. Friendship, Perception, and Referential Opacity in Nicomachean Ethics IX.9.Sean McAleer - 2013 - Logical Analysis and History of Philosophy 16:362-374.
    This essay reconstructs and evaluates Aristotle's argument in Nicomachean Ethics IX.9 that the happy person needs friends, in which Aristotle combines his well-known claim that friends are other selves with the claim that human perception is meta-perceptual: the perceiving subject perceives its own existence. After exploring some issues in the logic of perception, the essay argues that Aristotle's argument for the necessity of friends is invalid since perception-verbs create referentially opaque contexts in which the substitution of co-referential terms fails.
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  17. Other Selves.Efren A. Alverio - 2010 - Kritike 4 (1):199-218.
    Aristotle regarded highly the concept of friendship. For him, friendship—being one of the virtues just like truth, justice, courage, etc.—is something that affects not just human behavior but even the state’s as well . However, the English language has set a limit to its use and thus diminished its meaning. While the Greek for friendship, which is φιλια can be translated as love, when using the English language one cannot say that as A and B are friends, it must be (...)
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