Aristotle: Natural Science

Edited by Caleb Cohoe (Metropolitan State University of Denver, University of Colorado Denver)
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  1. Aristotle's Actual Infinities.Jacob Rosen - manuscript
    Aristotle is said to have held that any kind of actual infinity is impossible. I argue that he was a finitist (or "potentialist") about _magnitude_, but not about _plurality_. He did not deny that there are, or can be, infinitely many things in actuality. If this is right, then it has implications for Aristotle's views about the metaphysics of parts and points.
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  2. Zeno Beach.Jacob Rosen - forthcoming - Phronesis.
    On Zeno Beach there are infinitely many grains of sand, each half the size of the last. Supposing Aristotle denied the possibility of Zeno Beach, did he have a good argument for the denial? Three arguments, each of ancient origin, are examined: (1) the beach would be infinitely large; (2) the beach would be impossible to walk across; (3) the beach would contain a part equal to the whole, whereas parts must be lesser. It is attempted to show that none (...)
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  3. Aristotle on Motion in Incomplete Animals.Daniel Coren - forthcoming - Apeiron: A Journal for Ancient Philosophy and Science.
    I explain what Aristotle means when, after puzzling about the matter of motion in incomplete animals (those without sight, smell, hearing), he suggests in De Anima III 11.433b31-434a5 that just as incomplete animals are moved indeterminately, desire and phantasia are present in those animals, but present indeterminately. I argue that self-motion and its directing faculties in incomplete animals differ in degree but not in kind from those of complete animals. I examine how an object of desire differs for an incomplete (...)
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  4. Aristotle on Self-Change in Plants.Daniel Coren - 2019 - Rhizomata 7 (1):33-62.
    A lot of scholarly attention has been given to Aristotle’s account of how and why animals are capable of moving themselves. But no one has focused on the question, whether self-change is possible in plants on Aristotle’s account. I first give some context and explain why this topic is worth exploring. I then turn to Aristotle’s conditions for self-change given in Physics VIII.4, where he argues that the natural motion of the elements does not count as self-motion. I apply those (...)
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  5. Colloquium 2 Genesis and the Priority of Activity in Aristotle’s Metaphysics IX.8.Mark Sentesy - 2019 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 34 (1):43-70.
    This paper clarifies the way Aristotle uses generation to establish the priority of activity in time and in being. It opens by examining the concept of genetic priority. The argument for priority in beinghood has two parts. The first part is a synthetic argument that accomplishment is the primary kind of source, an argument based on the structure of generation. The second part engages three critical objections to the claim that activity could be an accomplishment: activity appears to lack its (...)
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  6. A. L. Peck: Aristotle, Historia Animalium. Vol. Ii . Pp. Viii+414 London: Heinemann, 1970. Cloth, £1·25.James Longrigg - 1973 - The Classical Review 23 (1):89-90.
  7. Aristotle's Physics I, II - W. Charlton: Aristotle, Physics, Books I and Ii. Translated with Introduction and Notes. Pp. Xvii+151. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1970. Cloth, £2. [REVIEW]Pamela M. Huby - 1972 - The Classical Review 22 (2):200-202.
  8. Philosophical Issues in Aristotle's Biology - Allan Gotthelf, James G. Lennox : Philosophical Issues in Aristotle's Biology. Pp. Xiii + 462; 2 Illustrations. Cambridge University Press, 1987. £30. [REVIEW]Gordon Haist - 1989 - The Classical Review 39 (1):47-48.
  9. Aristotle’s Theory of Language in the Light of Phys. I.1.Pavol Labuda - 2018 - Aither. Journal for the Study of Greek and Latin Philosophical Traditions 10 (20/2018 - International Issue 5):66-77.
    The main aim of my paper is to analyse Aristotle’s theory of language in the context of his Physics I.1 and via an analysis and an interpretation of this part of his Physics I try to show that (i) the study of human language (logos) significantly falls within the competence of Aristotle’s physics (i.e. natural philosophy), (ii) we can find the results of such (physical) inquiry in Aristotle’s zoological writings, stated in the forms of the first principles, causes and elements (...)
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  10. Aristotle’s 'Physics' Book I: A Systematic Exploration, Ed. Diana Quarantotto. [REVIEW]Jason W. Carter - 2018 - Bryn Mawr Classical Review 10.
    Originating from two conferences that took place in September 2013 and June 2015 at Sapienza University of Rome, this outstanding specialist volume aims to systematically illuminate the arguments that Aristotle uses in trying to establish the ‘first principles’ of his natural philosophy in Physics I. Not only is it successful in achieving this overall goal, but it is also timely, as its publication anticipates the forthcoming proceedings of the July 2014 Symposium Aristotelicum, devoted to the Physics.
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  11. Aristotle Against (Unqualified) Self-Motion: Physics VII 1 Α241b35-242a49 / Β241b25-242a15.Daniel Coren - forthcoming - Ancient Philosophy.
    It is well known that Aristotle tries to make room for self-motion – an idea he inherits to some extent from Plato – within his other commitments to causal determinism while at the same time modifying the idea. However, one argument in Physics VII 1 seems to pose a problem for the bare possibility of self-motion; in it he seems to argue that everything that moves must be moved by something else. The text in which this argument appears is itself (...)
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  12. Aristotle’s Resolution of the Aporia About Coming-To-Be in Physics I 8.Gabriela Rossi - 2017 - Eirene 53 (1):247-271.
    In Physica I,8 Aristotle endeavors to show that a long-term Eleatic puzzle about coming-to-be can be resolved by appealing to his own ontological principles of change (substratum, privation, and form). In this paper, I posit that the key to Aristotle’s resolution lies in the introduction of aspectual distinctions within numerical unities. These distinctions within the terminus a quo and the terminus as quem of coming-to-be made it possible for Aristotle to maintain, while answering the puzzle, that there is no coming-to-be (...)
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  13. Algunas notas sobre la discusión con los eléatas en Física I de Aristóteles.Gabriela Rossi - 2001 - Tópicos: Revista de Filosofía 20:137-159.
    The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the role of some peculiar elements of Aristotle's dialectical development —namely, those emerging in the Sophistical Refutations (SE)— in the analysis and discussion of the Eleatic thesis in Physics I, 2-3. The paper adresses some of Aristotle's preliminary thoughts (Phys. I, 2) (which are read as methodological considerations), and some remarks against Melissus' argument (Phys. I, 3), in order to find connections between such claims and passages of SE, as well as the (...)
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  14. Principios Propios y Principios Comunes. Una Lectura de Fis. I 7 de Aristóteles.Gabriela Rossi - 2001 - Méthexis 14 (1):101-116.
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  15. The Task of Philosophy in the Anthropocene: Axial Echoes in Global Space.Richard Polt & Jon Wittrock (eds.) - 2018 - London: Rowman & Littlefield International.
    In its early modern form, philosophy gave a decisive impetus to the science and technology that have transformed the planet and brought on the so-called Anthropocene. Can philosophy now help us understand this new age and act within it? The contributors to this volume take a broad historical view as they reflect on the responsibilities and possibilities for philosophy today.
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  16. Deleuze and Ancient Greek Physics: The Image of Nature.Michael James Bennett - 2017 - London, UK: Bloomsbury Academic.
    In 1988 the philosopher Gilles Deleuze remarked that throughout his career he had always been 'circling around' a concept of nature. Showing how Deleuze weaves original readings of Plato, the Stoics, Aristotle, and Epicurus into some of his most famous arguments about event, difference, and problem, Michael James Bennett argues that these interpretations of ancient Greek physics provide vital clues for understanding Deleuze's own conception of nature. -/- "Deleuze and Ancient Greek Physics" delves into the original Greek and Latin texts (...)
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  17. Book Review: Demetra Sfendoni-Mentzou, Aristotle Today: Aspects of Aristotle’s Philosophy of Nature From the Perspective of Contemporary Philosophy of Science. Thessaloniki: ZITI, 2010Sfendoni-MentzouDemetra, O Aριστοτέλης Σήµερα. Πτυχές Της Aριστοτελικής Φυσικής Φιλοσοϕίας Υπό Το Πρίσµα Της Σύγχρονης Επιστήµης. Thessalonica: Zήτη, 2010. 256 Pp. [REVIEW]Evanghelos Moutsopoulos - 2010 - Diogenes 57 (4):118-118.
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  18. O Lugar da história dos animais na obra de aristóteles: A propósito da primeira tradução portuguesa do tratado. [REVIEW]António Pedro Mesquita - 2006 - Philosophica 28:285-295.
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  19. Richard Sorabji, "Time, Creation, and the Continuum: Theories in Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages". [REVIEW]Steven K. Strange - 1985 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 23 (4):583.
  20. Helen S. Lang, "Aristotle's "Physics" and Its Medieval Varieties". [REVIEW]Edith Dudley Sylla - 1995 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 33 (1):161.
  21. Place-Names and the Date of Aristotle's Biological Works1.H. D. P. Lee - 1948 - Classical Quarterly 42 (3-4):61-67.
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  22. Aristotle and Corruptibility: C. J. F. WILLIAMS.C. J. F. Williams - 1965 - Religious Studies 1 (1):95-107.
    In a discussion-note in Mind, Father P. M. Farrell, O.P., gave an account, in what he admitted to be an embarrassingly brief compass, of the Thomist doctrine concerning evil. There is one sentence in this discussion which at first glance appears paradoxical. Father Farrell has been arguing that a universe containing ‘corruptible good’ as well as incorruptible is better than one containing ‘incorruptible good’ only. He continues: ‘If, however, they are to manifest this corruptible good, they must be corruptible and (...)
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  23. David Bolotin, An Approach to Aristotle's Physics, With Particular Attention to the Role of His Manner of Writing. [REVIEW]Wendy Helleman - 1998 - Philosophy in Review 18:317-319.
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  24. Aristotle's De Motu Animalium: Text with Translation, Commentary and Interpretive Essays.James G. Lennox - 1980 - Philosophy of Science 47 (1):156-159.
  25. Aristotle's Researches in Natural Science. [REVIEW]F. H. A. Marshall - 1913 - The Classical Review 27 (2):58-59.
  26. Webster's Translation of the Meteorologica. [REVIEW]H. Rackham - 1925 - The Classical Review 39 (1-2):27-28.
  27. Aristotle de Generatione Animalium. [REVIEW]R. G. Bury - 1911 - The Classical Review 25 (1):23-24.
  28. Aristotle's Four Books of Meteorologica. [REVIEW]St George Stock - 1921 - The Classical Review 35 (3-4):69-69.
  29. The Text of Aristotle's De Gen. Et Corr. M. Rashed: Die Überlieferungsgeschichte der Aristotelischen Schrift De Generatione Et Corruptione. (Serta Graeca: Beiträge Zur Erforschung Griechischer Texte 12.) Pp. Xiii + 386, Pls. Wiesbaden, Dr. Ludwig Reichert Verlag, 2001. Cased, €82. ISBN: 3-89500-212-. [REVIEW]Jonathan Barnes - 2005 - The Classical Review 55 (1):65-66.
  30. Aristotle's Meteorologica. [REVIEW]Edward Hussey - 1986 - The Classical Review 36 (2):213-216.
  31. Aristotle's Theory of Motion. [REVIEW]D. W. Hamlyn - 1963 - The Classical Review 13 (3):287-288.
  32. Untersuchungen Zur Entwick-Lungsgeschichte der Aristotelischen Meteoro-Logie. [REVIEW]D. J. Allan - 1936 - The Classical Review 50 (1):37-37.
  33. The Works of Aristotle. [REVIEW]F. H. A. Marshall - 1913 - The Classical Review 27 (8):283-284.
  34. Aristotle's Physics I, II. [REVIEW]Pamela M. Huby - 1972 - The Classical Review 22 (2):200-202.
  35. An Oxford Text of the De Generatione Animalium. [REVIEW]A. L. Peck - 1966 - The Classical Review 16 (2):171-173.
  36. On the Soul; Parva Naturalia; On Breath. [REVIEW]Hugh Tredennick - 1935 - The Classical Review 49 (6):240-241.
  37. The Works of Aristotle. [REVIEW]F. H. A. Marshall - 1912 - The Classical Review 26 (6):186-188.
  38. On Aristotle's Physics 7. [REVIEW]Helen Lang - 1995 - Review of Metaphysics 49 (1):167-170.
  39. Why the Elements Imitate the Heavens: Metaphysics Ix 8.1050b28-34.Helen S. Lang - 1994 - Ancient Philosophy 14 (2):335-354.
  40. Explanation and Teleology in Aristotle’s Science of Nature. By Mariska Leunissen. [REVIEW]Byron J. Stoyles - 2012 - Ancient Philosophy 32 (2):452-458.
  41. Rodier's De Anima of Aristotle. [REVIEW]H. M'Leod Innes - 1902 - The Classical Review 16 (9):461-463.
  42. Science and Method. On Aristotle’s Theory of Natural Science. [REVIEW]C. Joachim Classen - 1976 - Philosophy and History 9 (2):155-157.
  43. Reading Aristotle Physics VII.3: ‘What is Alteration?’. [REVIEW]Patrick Madigan - 2013 - Heythrop Journal 54 (4):691-691.
  44. Pneuma and Ether in Aristotle’s Philosophy of Living Nature.Abraham Bos - 2002 - Modern Schoolman 79 (4):255-276.
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  45. "Aristotle's Vision of Nature," by Frederick J. E. Woodbridge, Ed. With Introd. By John Herman Randall, Jr. [REVIEW]Richard J. Blackwell - 1966 - Modern Schoolman 43 (3):298-299.
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  46. Embodied and Embedded: Friendship and the Sunaisthetic Self.April Flakne - 2005 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 10 (1):37-63.
    Sunaisthesis is a generally overlooked or misconstrued concept central to Aristotle’s philosophy of friendship, and therefore to his entire ethical and politicalproject. As opposed to Stoic uses that presuppose ethical self-relation, in Aristotle’s coinage, sunaisthesis indicates the genesis of a self-relation mediated through the friend. Both the “merged selves” and the “mirrored selves” approaches to Aristotelian friendship distort this peculiar mediation. Through a close reading of relevant texts, I show that sunaisthesis provides the missing link between the De Anima’s non-reflexive (...)
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  47. Shaping the Language of Inquiry: Aristotle’s Transformation of the Meanings of Thaumaston.Mark Shiffman - 2005 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 10 (1):21-36.
    In protreptic passages in three Aristotelian texts, there is a close relationship betweenthe use of the language of thaumaston and that of timion. These texts exhibit a progressive opening of Aristotle’s students to further horizons of philosophical awareness, within which is embedded a global transformation of the meanings of thaumaston. They mark the itinerary of a spiritual formation in which a new relationship through language to phenomena and to others liberates the student from a psychology of emulation into a discipline (...)
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  48. Commentary on Aristotle’s Physics. [REVIEW]John J. FitzGerald - 1965 - New Scholasticism 39 (2):261-264.
  49. Aristotle’s First Movers and the Relation of Physics to Theology.Helen S. Lang - 1978 - New Scholasticism 52 (4):500-517.
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  50. Aristotle on the Generation of Animals: A Philosophical Study. [REVIEW]Michael Boylan - 1987 - International Studies in Philosophy 19 (1):95-97.
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