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  1. Ethics for Rational Animals. The Moral Psychology at the Basis of Aristotle's Ethics.Elena Cagnoli Fiecconi - 2024 - Oxford University Press.
    Ethics for Rational Animals brings to light a novel account of akrasia, practical wisdom, and character virtue through an original and comprehensive study of the moral psychology at the basis of Aristotle's ethics. It argues that practical wisdom is a persuasive rational excellence, that virtue is a listening excellence, and that the ignorance involved in akrasia is in fact a failure of persuasion. Aristotle's moral psychology emerges from this reconstruction as a qualified intellectualism. The view is intellectualistic because it describes (...)
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  2. Giovanni Pico della Mirandola.Francisco Bastitta Harriet - 2022 - In Natalia Jacubecki, María Cecilia Rusconi & Natalia Strok (eds.), Platón cosmólogo. Recepción del Timeo entre la Edad Media y la temprana Modernidad. Winograd. pp. 483-529.
    As in the case of other humanists and philosophers of the period, an important aspect of Pico della Mirandola's interpretation of the Platonic Timaeus consists of direct access to the dialogue in its original Greek, which the young man possessed in his personal library. This does not mean that Pico does not also take an interest in the ancient Latin translations of Cicero and Calcidius, both personally and in Ficino's circle. But these are read with the critical distance and the (...)
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  3. Riscrivere la filosofia della natura di Alberto Magno nel XIV secolo. Il V libro della Catena aurea entium di Enrico di Herford e il commento di Alberto ai Meteorologica di Aristotele.Chiara Marcon - 2024 - Noctua 11 (1):1-48.
    The Catena aurea entium of Henry of Herford is part of the work of re-elaboration of Aristotle’s natural-philosophical corpus, which characterised the European intellectual environment in the Late Middle Ages. In the central books of his encyclopaedia, Henry comments on the works of natural philosophy of Albert the Great, placing himself in continuity with the cultural project started by Albert in Cologne. The present article aims to compare the 5th book of the Catena aurea entium, which consists of a comment (...)
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  4. Aristotle on transparency.Mark Eli Kalderon - 2018 - In Thomas Crowther & Clare Mac Cumhaill (eds.), Perceptual Ephemera. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
    A puzzle about the presentation of objects located at a distance is seen to animate Aristotle's account of transparency in De Anima and De Sensu.
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  5. Aristotle’s First Moves Regarding Perception: A Reading of (most of) De Anima 2.5.Andreas Anagnostopoulos - 2023 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 105 (1):68-117.
    Whereas scholars often look to De Anima 2.5 to support one or another understanding of the sense in which perception, for Aristotle, qualifies as an alteration and qualitative assimilation to the sense-object, I ask the more basic question of what the chapter is meant to establish or accomplish with respect to the question whether perception is an alteration. I argue that the chapter does not presuppose or legitimate the view that perception is an alteration where it is thought to, and (...)
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  6. Aristotle on intra- and inter-species friendship.Thornton C. Lockwood - forthcoming - In Sophia Connell (ed.), Philosophical Essays on Aristotle’s Historia Animalium.
    Although there is much scholarship on Aristotle’s account of friendship (φιλία), almost all of it has focused on inter-personal relationships between human animals. Nonetheless, in both Aristotle’s ethical and zoological writings, he documents the intra- and inter-species friendship between many kinds of animals, including between human and non-human animals. Such non-human animal friendships establish both an indirect basis for establishing moral ties between humans and non-human animals (insofar as we respect their capacity to love and befriend others) and a direct (...)
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  7. What about Plurality? Aristotle’s Discussion of Zeno’s Paradoxes.Barbara M. Sattler - 2021 - Peitho 12 (1):85-106.
    While Aristotle provides the crucial testimonies for the paradoxes of motion, topos, and the falling millet seed, surprisingly he shows almost no interest in the paradoxes of plurality. For Plato, by contrast, the plurality paradoxes seem to be the central paradoxes of Zeno and Simplicius is our primary source for those. This paper investigates why the plurality paradoxes are not examined by Aristotle and argues that a close look at the context in which Aristotle discusses Zeno holds the answer to (...)
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  8. Being is Better Than Not Being: The Metaphysics of Goodness and Beauty in Aristotle.Christopher V. Mirus - 2022 - Washington, DC, USA: Catholic University of America Press.
    In his contemplative works on nature, Aristotle twice appeals to the general principle that being is better than not being. Taking his cue from this claim, Christopher V. Mirus offers an extended, systematic account of how Aristotle understands being itself to be good. Mirus begins with the human, examining Aristotle's well-known claim that the end of a human life is the good of the human substance as such--which turns out to be the good of the human capacity for thought. Human (...)
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  9. Aristotle’s theory of seed: seeking a unified account.Xinkai Hu - 2022 - Filosofia Unisinos 23 (1):1-9.
    Aristotle’s theory of seed has occupied a very important place in the history of ancient embryology and medicine. Previous studies have overemphasized, in light of the APo. II method, Aristotle’s definition of seed as male semen. In this paper, I wish to show that there are at least three independent definitions of seed working in Aristotle’s Generation of Animals: seed as male semen, seed as female menstruation and seed as embryo. Those three definitions are mutually exclusive on the one hand, (...)
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  10. Against Nagel - In Favour of a Compound Human Ergon.Juliette Christie - 1996 - Dialogue 38 (2-3):77-82.
    Thomas Nagel argues that Aristotle identifies rationality as the ergon idion of the human being. Against Nagel, I defend a reading of Aristotle which depicts a complex human ergon. This complex identity involves desire. It is in Book X of the Nichomachean Ethics that my understanding of Aristotle's position is clinched.
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  11. Aristotle on Flight: Air as an External Resting Point.Daniel Coren - 2021 - Rhizomata 9 (1):123-138.
    I reconstruct Aristotle’s explanation for why and how birds are capable of natural flight. For Aristotle, air is a markedly different external resting point in comparison with water and earth, and nature has designed birds so as to take advantage of the unique way in which air affects the inequality between the pushing downward, that is, the downward force and the resistance. My discussion sheds some light on Aristotle’s anticipation of some aspects of modern fluid dynamics and aerodynamics.
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  12. Neglected evidence for Aristotle, historia animalivm 7(8) in the works of ancient homeric scholars.Robert Mayhew - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (1):442-446.
    This brief article aims to supplement Stefan Schnieders's presentation of the evidence for Historia animalium 7—that is, Book 7 according to the manuscript tradition, Book 8 according to Theodore Gaza's rearrangement—having been considered the seventh book of this work in antiquity. This is accomplished through the discussion of two texts not considered by Schnieders, both of them passages commenting on Iliad Book 21: P.Oxy. 221 and Porphyry, Homeric Questions Book 1.
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  13. Review of Johnson. Aristotle on Teleology. [REVIEW]Thornton Lockwood - 2006 - Bryn Mawr Classical Review 8:37.
    Few ideas are more central to Aristotle’s thought than that of the causal purposiveness of natural things. Few ideas in the Aristotelian corpus are more controverted—whether historically, by early modern natural philosophers seeking to break with Aristotelian science or currently, by modern scholars of ancient philosophy seeking to interpret Aristotle’s physics—than what has come to be called Aristotle’s “teleology” (a term coined in the 18th century, apparently by the German philosopher Christian Wolff). In this ambitious study (derived from the author’s (...)
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  14. Aristotle’s Criticism of Pre-Socratic Natural Philosophy.Abduljaleel Alwali - 2006 - Amman, Jordan: Dar Al-Warraq.
    Aristotle (384-322 B.C), a well know Greek philosopher, physician, scientist and politician. A variety of identifying researches have been written on him. It is therefore a considerable pride for the researcher to write something about him when even mentioning his name and his father's name is a point of prestige in the Greek Language. His name means the preferable sublimity whereas Nicomachus (his father's name) means the definable negotiator. His father's and mother's origin belongs to Asclepiade, the favorite origin in (...)
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  15. Animism, Aristotelianism, and the Legacy of William Gilbert’s De Magnete.Jeff Kochan - 2021 - Perspectives on Science 29 (2):157-188.
    William Gilbert’s 1600 book, De magnete, greatly influenced early modern natural philosophy. The book describes an impressive array of physical experiments, but it also advances a metaphysical view at odds with the soon to emerge mechanical philosophy. That view was animism. I distinguish two kinds of animism – Aristotelian and Platonic – and argue that Gilbert was an Aristotelian animist. Taking Robert Boyle as an example, I then show that early modern arguments against animism were often effective only against Platonic (...)
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  16. Telos and Apeiron in Aristotle’s Science of Nature.Thomas Marré - 2021 - Ancient Philosophy 41 (1):105-122.
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  17. Why did Aristotle invent the material cause ? The early development of the concept of hê hylê.Monte Ransome Johnson - 2020 - In Pierre Pellegrin & Françoise Graziani (eds.), L'HÉRITAGE D'ARISTOTE AUJOURD'HUI : NATURE ET SOCIÉTÉ. Alessandria: Editzioni dell'Orso. pp. 59-86.
    I present a developmental account of Aristotle’s concept of hê hylê (usually translated “the matter”), focused the earliest developments. I begin by analyzing fragments of some lost early works and a chapter of the Organon, texts which indicate that early in his career Aristotle had not yet begun to use he hylê in a technical sense. Next, I examine Physics II 3, a chapter in which Aristotle conceives of he hylê not as a kind of cause in its own right, (...)
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  18. Aristotle's De Anima.Paul Shorey - 1901 - American Journal of Philology 22 (2):149.
  19. Aristotle on Plato's Receptacle.David Keyt - 1961 - American Journal of Philology 82 (3):291.
  20. Misplaced Passages at the End of Aristotle's Physics.Friedrich Solmsen - 1961 - American Journal of Philology 82 (3):270.
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  21. Aristotle's System of the Physical World. A Comparison with His Predecessors.Philip Merlan & Friedrich Solmsen - 1962 - American Journal of Philology 83 (2):202.
  22. Review of H. A. T. Reiche, Empedocles' Mixture, Eudoxan Astronomy and Aristotle's Connate Pneuma, with an Appendix "General because First" a Presocratic Motif in Aristotle's Theology. [REVIEW]Friedrich Solmsen - 1963 - American Journal of Philology 84 (1):91.
  23. Presuppositions of Aristotle's Physics.George Boas - 1936 - American Journal of Philology 57 (1):24.
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  24. De Motu Animalium.H. B. Gottschalk, Aristotle & Martha Craven Nussbaum - 1981 - American Journal of Philology 102 (1):84.
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  25. Aristotle on Velocity in the Void.Joseph Katz - 1943 - American Journal of Philology 64 (4):432.
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  26. Zeno Beach.Jacob Rosen - 2020 - Phronesis 65 (4):467-500.
    On Zeno Beach there are infinitely many grains of sand, each half the size of the last. Supposing Aristotle denied the possibility of Zeno Beach, did he have a good argument for the denial? Three arguments, each of ancient origin, are examined: the beach would be infinitely large; the beach would be impossible to walk across; the beach would contain a part equal to the whole, whereas parts must be lesser. It is attempted to show that none of these arguments (...)
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  27. Vergil’s Physics of Bugonia in Georgics 4.Peter Osorio - 2020 - Classical Philology 115 (1):27-46.
  28. Review of: R. Polansky & W. Wians (eds.), Reading Aristotle. Argument and Exposition. [REVIEW]Florian Marion - 2019 - Revue Philosophique De Louvain 117 (1):166-169.
    Review of: R. Polansky & W. Wians (eds.), Reading Aristotle. Argument and Exposition, Leiden/Boston, Brill, 2017, in Revue philosophique de Louvain, 117, p. 166-169.
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  29. SIMPLICIUS’ COMMENTARY ON ARISTOTLE - (A.) Lernould (trans.) Simplicius. Commentaire sur la Physique d'Aristote. Livre II, ch. 1–3. (Cahiers de philology 35.) Pp. 234. Villeneuve d'Ascq: Presses Universitaires du Septentrion, 2019. Paper, €26. ISBN: 978-2-7574-2465-0. [REVIEW]Giovanna R. Giardina - 2020 - The Classical Review 70 (2):367-369.
  30. Aristotle’s Theory of Bodies, by Christian Pfeiffer.Mary Katrina Krizan - 2020 - Ancient Philosophy 40 (2):512-515.
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  31. The Cause of Cosmic Rotation in Aristotle’s Metaphysics xii 6-7.John Proios - 2020 - Ancient Philosophy 40 (2):349-367.
    In Metaphysics Λ.6-7 Aristotle argues that an unmoved substance causes the outermost sphere to rotate. His argument has puzzled and divided commentators from ancient Greece to the present. I offer a novel defense of Aristotle's argument by highlighting the logic of classification that Aristotle deploys. The core of Aristotle's argument is the identification of the unmoved substance on the 'table of opposites' as simple and purely actual. With this identification in place, Aristotle argues that the outermost sphere activates its capacity (...)
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  32. Aristotle on Motion in Incomplete Animals.Daniel Coren - 2020 - Apeiron 53 (3):285-314.
    I explain what Aristotle means when, after puzzling about the matter of motion in incomplete animals (those without sight, smell, hearing), he suggests in De Anima III 11.433b31–434a5 that just as incomplete animals are moved indeterminately, desire and phantasia are present in those animals, but present indeterminately. I argue that self-motion and its directing faculties in incomplete animals differ in degree but not in kind from those of complete animals. I examine how an object of desire differs for an incomplete (...)
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  33. Nutritive and Sentient Soul in Aristotle’s Generation of Animals 2.5.Sophia M. Connell - 2020 - Phronesis 65 (3):324-354.
    This paper argues that focusing on Aristotle’s theory of generation as primarily ‘hylomorphic’ can lead to difficulties. This is especially evident when interpreting the association between the male and sentient soul at GA 2.5. If the focus is on the male’s contribution as form and the female’s as matter, then soul becomes divided into nutritive from female and sentient from male which makes little sense in Aristotle’s biological ontology. In contrast, by seeing Aristotle’s theory as ‘archēkinētic’, a process initiated by (...)
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  34. Aristotle on Earlier Greek Psychology: The Science of the Soul by Jason W. Carter. [REVIEW]Colin Guthrie King - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (2):400-401.
    Once upon a time in the twentieth century, it was considered good sense by some to think that Aristotle began his De anima with a series of very Aristotelian theories about the soul, and that the function of its first book was to eristically taunt his predecessors for failing to appreciate hylomorphism, or patronizingly praise them for getting the odd bit right. Jason Carter deserves our thanks for showing how wrong-headed this reading of Aristotle is. His book begins with the (...)
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  35. Advancing the Aristotelian Project in Contemporary Metaphysics: A Review Essay.Robert C. Koons - 2019 - Philosophia Christi 21 (2):435-442.
    In a recent book, Substance and the Fundamentality of the Familiar, Ross Inman demonstrates the contemporary relevance of an Aristotelian approach to metaphysics and the philosophy of nature. Inman successfully applies the Aristotelian framework to a number of outstanding problems in metaphysics, philosophy of mind, and the philosophy of physics. Inman tackles some intriguing questions about the ontological status of proper parts, questions which constitute a central focus of ongoing debate and investigation.
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  36. Aristotle's Actual Infinities.Jacob Rosen - 2021 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 59.
    Aristotle is said to have held that any kind of actual infinity is impossible. I argue that he was a finitist (or "potentialist") about _magnitude_, but not about _plurality_. He did not deny that there are, or can be, infinitely many things in actuality. If this is right, then it has implications for Aristotle's views about the metaphysics of parts and points.
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  37. Aristotle on Motion in Incomplete Animals.Daniel Coren - forthcoming - Apeiron: A Journal for Ancient Philosophy and Science.
    I explain what Aristotle means when, after puzzling about the matter of motion in incomplete animals (those without sight, smell, hearing), he suggests in De Anima III 11.433b31-434a5 that just as incomplete animals are moved indeterminately, desire and phantasia are present in those animals, but present indeterminately. I argue that self-motion and its directing faculties in incomplete animals differ in degree but not in kind from those of complete animals. I examine how an object of desire differs for an incomplete (...)
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  38. Aristotle’s Science of Matter and Motion. By Christopher Byrne. [REVIEW]Errol G. Katayama - 2020 - Ancient Philosophy 40 (1):227-232.
  39. Aristotle against (unqualified) self-motion.Daniel Coren - 2019 - Ancient Philosophy 39 (2):363-380.
    Every thing that moves is caused to move by something else. Yet there are things that move themselves. How does Aristotle square those two commitments? This paper helps to answer that question. One argument in Physics VII 1 seems to pose a problem for the bare possibility of self-motion; in it he seems to argue that everything that moves must be moved by something else. The text in which this argument appears is itself vexed on a number of fronts, because (...)
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  40. Aristotle on Self-Change in Plants.Daniel Coren - 2019 - Rhizomata 7 (1):33-62.
    A lot of scholarly attention has been given to Aristotle’s account of how and why animals are capable of moving themselves. But no one has focused on the question, whether self-change is possible in plants on Aristotle’s account. I first give some context and explain why this topic is worth exploring. I then turn to Aristotle’s conditions for self-change given in Physics VIII.4, where he argues that the natural motion of the elements does not count as self-motion. I apply those (...)
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  41. Aristotle on multiple demonstration.Elena Comay del Junco - 2019 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 27 (5):902-920.
    How many scientific demonstrations can a single phenomenon have? This paper argues that, according to Aristotle's theory of scientific knowledge as laid out in the Posterior Analytics, a single conclusion may be demonstrated via more than one explanatory middle term. I also argue that this model of multiple demonstration is put into practice in the biological writings. This paper thereby accomplishes two related goals: it clarifies certain relatively obscure passages of the Posterior Analytics and uses them to show how Aristotle (...)
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  42. Colloquium 2 Genesis and the Priority of Activity in Aristotle’s Metaphysics IX.8.Mark Sentesy - 2019 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 34 (1):43-70.
    This paper clarifies the way Aristotle uses generation to establish the priority of activity in time and in being. It opens by examining the concept of genetic priority. The argument for priority in beinghood has two parts. The first part is a synthetic argument that accomplishment is the primary kind of source, an argument based on the structure of generation. The second part engages three critical objections to the claim that activity could be an accomplishment: activity appears to lack its (...)
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  43. Aristotle on the Good of Reproduction.Myrna Gabbe - 2020 - Apeiron 53 (4):363-395.
    This paper discusses Aristotle’s theory of reproduction: specifically, the good that he thinks organisms attain by reproducing. The aim of this paper is to refute the widespread theory that Aristotle believes plants and animals reproduce for the sake of attenuated immortality. This interpretive claim plays an important role in supporting one leading interpretation of Aristotle’s teleology: the theory that Aristotelian nature is teleologically oriented with a view solely to what benefits individual organisms, and what benefits the organism is its survival (...)
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  44. Aristotle's Four Books of Meteorologica.R. G. Bury - 1921 - The Classical Review 35 (3-4):69-69.
  45. A. L. Peck: Aristotle, Historia Animalium. Vol. ii (Books iv–vi). (Loeb Classical Library.) Pp. viii+414 London: Heinemann, 1970. Cloth, £1·25.James Longrigg - 1973 - The Classical Review 23 (1):89-90.
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  46. Aristotle's Physics I, II - W. Charlton: Aristotle, Physics, Books i and ii. Translated with Introduction and Notes. Pp. xvii+151. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1970. Cloth, £2. [REVIEW]Pamela M. Huby - 1972 - The Classical Review 22 (2):200-202.
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  47. A Battle Against Pain? Aristotle, Theophrastus and the Physiologoi in Aspasius, On Nicomachean Ethics 156.14-20.Wei Cheng - 2017 - Phronesis 62 (4):392-416.
  48. The reception of Aristotle's zoology - sassi, coda, feola la zoologia di aristotele E la sua ricezione dall'età ellenistica E Romana alle culture medievali. Atti Della X ‘settimana di formazione’ Del centro gral, Pisa, 18–20 novembre 2015. Pp. 315. Pisa: Pisa university press, 2017. Paper, €20. Isbn: 978-88-6741-835-0. [REVIEW]Roberto Medda - 2019 - The Classical Review 69 (1):67-70.
  49. Philosophical Issues in Aristotle's Biology - Allan Gotthelf, James G. Lennox : Philosophical Issues in Aristotle's Biology. Pp. xiii + 462; 2 illustrations. Cambridge University Press, 1987. £30. [REVIEW]Gordon Haist - 1989 - The Classical Review 39 (1):47-48.
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  50. Aristotle on Nature and Living Things - Allan Gotthelf : Aristotle on Nature and Living Things. Philosophical and Historical Studies Presented to David M. Balme on his Seventieth Birthday. Pp. xxiii + 410; 1 plate. Pittsburg, PA and Bristol: Mathesis Publications and Bristol Classical Press, 1985. £27. [REVIEW]Gordon Haist - 1989 - The Classical Review 39 (1):45-46.
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