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  1. Aristotle on Motion in Incomplete Animals.Daniel Coren - forthcoming - Apeiron: A Journal for Ancient Philosophy and Science.
    I explain what Aristotle means when, after puzzling about the matter of motion in incomplete animals (those without sight, smell, hearing), he suggests in De Anima III 11.433b31-434a5 that just as incomplete animals are moved indeterminately, desire and phantasia are present in those animals, but present indeterminately. I argue that self-motion and its directing faculties in incomplete animals differ in degree but not in kind from those of complete animals. I examine how an object of desire differs for an incomplete (...)
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  2. Aristotle on Self-Change in Plants.Daniel Coren - 2019 - Rhizomata 7 (1):33-62.
    A lot of scholarly attention has been given to Aristotle’s account of how and why animals are capable of moving themselves. But no one has focused on the question, whether self-change is possible in plants on Aristotle’s account. I first give some context and explain why this topic is worth exploring. I then turn to Aristotle’s conditions for self-change given in Physics VIII.4, where he argues that the natural motion of the elements does not count as self-motion. I apply those (...)
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  3. The Posterior Analytics - Lesher From Inquiry to Demonstrative Knowledge. New Essays on Aristotle's Posterior Analytics. Pp. Xii + 211. Kelowna, BC, Canada: Academic Printing & Publishing, 2010. Paper, Cdn$28.95 . ISBN: 978-1-926598-01-7. [REVIEW]Paolo Biondi - 2012 - The Classical Review 62 (1):76-78.
  4. Aristotle’s Theory of Language in the Light of Phys. I.1.Pavol Labuda - 2018 - Aither. Journal for the Study of Greek and Latin Philosophical Traditions 10 (20/2018 - International Issue 5):66-77.
    The main aim of my paper is to analyse Aristotle’s theory of language in the context of his Physics I.1 and via an analysis and an interpretation of this part of his Physics I try to show that (i) the study of human language (logos) significantly falls within the competence of Aristotle’s physics (i.e. natural philosophy), (ii) we can find the results of such (physical) inquiry in Aristotle’s zoological writings, stated in the forms of the first principles, causes and elements (...)
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  5. Aristotle on Earlier Greek Psychology: The Science of Soul.Jason W. Carter - 2019 - Cambridge University Press.
    This volume is the first in English to provide a full, systematic investigation into Aristotle's criticisms of earlier Greek theories of the soul from the perspective of his theory of scientific explanation. Some interpreters of the De Anima have seen Aristotle's criticisms of Presocratic, Platonic, and other views about the soul as unfair or dialectical, but Jason W. Carter argues that Aristotle's criticisms are in fact a justified attempt to test the adequacy of earlier theories in terms of the theory (...)
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  6. David Bronstein. Aristotle on Knowledge and Learning: The Posterior Analytics. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016. Pp. Xiii+272. $74.00. [REVIEW]Owen Goldin - 2017 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 7 (1):173-176.
  7. Aristotle’s Solution to Meno’s Paradox.Eugene Orlov - 2012 - Sententiae 26 (1):5-27.
    The paper is devoted to Aristotle's solution to Meno's paradox: a person cannot search for what he knows -- he knows it, and there is no need to search for such a thing -- nor for what he doesn't know -- since he doesn't know what he's searching for. The autor argues that Aristotle proposes solutions of this paradox for every stage of cognition, not only for exercising available scientific knowledge as regarded by most Aristotelian scholars. He puts more focus (...)
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  8. Aristotle on Scientific Knowledge. [REVIEW]J. D. G. Evans - 1994 - The Chesterton Review 44 (1):84-85.
  9. Logical and Physical Inquiries in Aristotle’s Metaphysics.Michael Ferejohn - 2003 - Modern Schoolman 80 (4):325-350.
  10. Sobre algunos claroscuros de la reflexión metacientífica aristotélica.Mauricio Beuchot - 1986 - Theoria: Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia 1 (3):749-778.
    The aim of this paper is to highlight the main features of the philosophy of science that are present in Aristotle’s Posterior Analytics. At the same time I attempt to point out some obscure proposals within his metascientific theory and to distinguish certain aspects in which the Aristotelian Model of science has become inapplicable nowadays.
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  11. Coming to Know Principles in Posterior Analytics II 19.Greg Bayer - 1997 - Apeiron 30 (2):109-142.
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  12. Is Aristotle an Empiricist? Is He an Ant, a Spider or a Bee?D. Z. Andriopoulos - 1998 - Philosophical Inquiry 20 (1-2):83-100.
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  13. Aristotle's Philosophy of the Sciences.Jonathan Barnes - 1993 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 11:225-241.
  14. Ciencia y opinión en Aristóteles.António Pedro Mesquita - 2008 - Revista de Filosofía de la Universidad de Costa Rica 46 (117):129-136.
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  15. Circular Justification and Explanation in Aristotle.Owen Goldin - 2013 - Phronesis 58 (3):195-214.
    Aristotle’s account of epistēmē is foundationalist. In contrast, the web of dialectical argumentation that constitutes justification for scientific principles is coherentist. Aristotle’s account of explanation is structurally parallel to the argument for a foundationalist account of justification. He accepts the first argument but his coherentist accounts of justification indicate that he would not accept the second. Where is the disanalogy? For Aristotle, the intelligibility of a demonstrative premise is the cause of the intelligibility of a demonstrated conclusion and causation is (...)
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  16. Syllogism, Demonstration, and Definition in Aristotle's Topics and Posterior Analytics.James Allen - 2011 - In Michael Frede, James V. Allen, Eyjólfur Kjalar Emilsson, Wolfgang-Rainer Mann & Benjamin Morison (eds.), Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy: Essays in Memory of Michael Frede. Summer 2011. Vol. 40. Oxford University Press. pp. 40--63.
  17. Aristotle’s Theory of Science and His Biological Writings: Allan Gotthelf: Teleology, First Principles, and Scientific Method in Aristotle’s Biology. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012, 440pp, $99.00 HB.Andrea Falcon - 2013 - Metascience 22 (2):317-321.
  18. The Intersection of the Mathematical and Natural Sciences: The Subordinate Sciences in Aristotle.Peter M. Distelzweig - 2013 - Apeiron 46 (2):85 - 105.
    Journal Name: Apeiron Issue: Ahead of print.
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  19. Épistémologie Et Pratique de la Science Chez Aristote: Les Seconds Analytiques Et la Définition de l'Âme Dans le de Anima.Martin Achard - 2004 - Klincksieck.
  20. Aristotle's De Motu Animalium and the Separability of the Sciences.Joan Kung - 1982 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 20 (1):65-76.
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  21. Being Clear About the Explanation: A Mathematical Example in Aristotle, Metaphysica Θ.9, 1051a26–9.P. S. Hasper - 2011 - Classical Quarterly 61 (1):172-177.
  22. Teleology, First Principles, and Scientific Method in Aristotle’s Biology.Allan Gotthelf - 2012 - Oxford University Press.
    This volume draws together Allan Gotthelf's pioneering work on Aristotle's biology. He examines Aristotle's natural teleology, the axiomatic structure of biological explanation, and the reliance on scientifically organized data in the three great works with which Aristotle laid the foundations of biological science.
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  23. Aristotelian Problems.James G. Lennox - 1994 - Ancient Philosophy 14 (S1):53-77.
  24. Science and Philosophy in Aristotle's "Generation of Animals".Anthony Preus - 1970 - Journal of the History of Biology 3 (1):1 - 52.
  25. Coming to Know Principles in "Posterior Analytics" II 19.Greg Bayer - 1997 - Apeiron 30 (2):109 - 142.
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  26. Against the Functionalist Reading of Aristotle’s Philosophy of Perception and Emotion.Eric F. LaRock - 2002 - International Philosophical Quarterly 42 (2):231-258.
    Examining the literature on Aristotelian psychology can leave one with the impression that his theory of perception and emotion is credible primarily because it accords with contemporary functionalism, a physicalist theory that has achieved orthodoxy in contemporary philosophy of mind. In my view, squeezing Aristotle into a functionalist mold is a mistake, for functionalism entaiIs at least two theses that Aristotle would reject: (1) that material types make no essential difference to perception and emotion (and to mental states in general), (...)
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  27. Empeiria in Aristotle.Travis Butler - 2003 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 41 (3):329-350.
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  28. Aristotelian Epagoge.D. W. Hamlyn - 1976 - Phronesis 21 (2):167-184.
  29. Aristotle Rules, OK?José M. Villagrán & Rogelio Luque - 2008 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 15 (3):265-268.
  30. The Nature of the Organic. On the Scientific Significance of Aristotelian Biology.Martin F. Meyer - 2008 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 13 (1):32-53.
    The core thesis of the paper is that the constitution of biological science begins with a conceptual innovation with far-reaching consequences with effect up to the present: by conceiving the parts of living beings as organs (that is, as tools), Aristotle laid the foundation stone for a functional explanation of animate nature. Comparative anatomy is thus transformed from a merely descriptive to an explanatory theory. The point of the discussion is above all that a functional explanation must not be confused (...)
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  31. Aristotle and Contemporary Science, T Esalónica, Septiembre de 1997.Pin Víctor Gómez - 1998 - Theoria 13 (1):195-197.
  32. The Obama-Tribe 'Curvature of Constitutional Space' Paper is Crackpot Physics.Frank J. Tipler - unknown
    The Harvard Law School professor Laurence Tribe published a paper entitled "The Curvature of Constitutional Space," wherein he argued that the strict constructionist interpretations of the U.S. Constitution were obsolete, being based on a Newtonian world-view, and need to be replaced by a more modern relativistic and quantum mechanical world-view. I shall show on the contrary that in using general relativity and quantum mechanics, we have never left the Newtonian world-view. It was shown in 1923 by the greatest geometer of (...)
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Aristotle: Empiricism
  1. Conviction, Priority, and Rationalism in Aristotle's Epistemology.Marc Gasser-Wingate - 2020 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 58 (1):1-27.
    In this paper I argue against rationalist readings of Aristotle's epistemology, on which our scientific understanding is justified on the basis of certain demonstrative first principles that are themselves justified only by some brute form of rational intuition. I then investigate the relationship between our intuition of principles and the broadly perceptual knowledge from which it derives. I argue that, for Aristotle, perceptual knowledge helps justify our intuition of principles, and also serves as an authority against which these principles and (...)
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  2. Aristotle's Case for Perceptual Knowledge.Robert Howton - 2017 - Dissertation, University of Toronto
    Sense experience, naïvely conceived, is a way of knowing perceptible properties: the colors, sounds, smells, flavors, and textures in our perceptual environment. So conceived, ordinary experience presents the perceiver with the essential nature of a property like Sky Blue or Middle C, such that how the property appears in experience is identical to how it essentially is. In antiquity, as today, it was controversial whether sense experience could meet the conditions for knowledge implicit in this naïve conception. Aristotle was a (...)
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  3. Jean De Groot. Aristotle’s Empiricism: Experience and Mechanics in the Fourth Century BC. Las Vegas, NV: Parmenides, 2014. Pp. Xxv+442. $127.00. [REVIEW]Richard DeWitt - 2017 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 7 (1):176-179.
  4. Aristotle on Meaning.Jean-Louis Hudry - 2011 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 93 (3):253-280.
    This paper shows that Aristotle's De Interpretatione does not separate syntax from semantics. Linguistic sentences are not syntactic entities, and non-linguistic meanings are not semantic propositions expressed by linguistic sentences. In fact, Aristotle resorts to a mental conception of meaning, distinguishing linguistic meanings in a given language from non-linguistic mental contents in relation to actual things: while the former are not the same for all, the latter are shared by everyone. Aristotle is not a modern logician, like Boole, Frege, or (...)
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  5. Observações sobre o conhecimento empírico em Aristóteles.Daniel Rubião de Andrade - 2010 - Itaca 15:32-41.
  6. Aristotle on Induction and First Principles.Marc Gasser-Wingate - 2016 - Philosophers' Imprint 16:1-20.
    Aristotle's cognitive ideal is a form of understanding that requires a sophisticated grasp of scientific first principles. At the end of the Analytics, Aristotle tells us that we learn these principles by induction. But on the whole, commentators have found this an implausible claim: induction seems far too basic a process to yield the sort of knowledge Aristotle's account requires. In this paper I argue that this criticism is misguided. I defend a broader reading of Aristotelian induction, on which there's (...)
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Aristotle: Mathematical Science
  1. Aristotle’s Argument From Universal Mathematics Against the Existence of Platonic Forms.Pieter Sjoerd Hasper - 2019 - Manuscrito 42 (4):544-581.
    In Metaphysics M.2, 1077a9-14, Aristotle appears to argue against the existence of Platonic Forms on the basis of there being certain universal mathematical proofs which are about things that are ‘beyond’ the ordinary objects of mathematics and that cannot be identified with any of these. It is a very effective argument against Platonism, because it provides a counter-example to the core Platonic idea that there are Forms in order to serve as the object of scientific knowledge: the universal of which (...)
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  2. Knowing by Doing: The Role of Geometrical Practice in Aristotle’s Theory of Knowledge.Monica Ugaglia - 2015 - Elenchos 36 (1):45-88.
    Aristotle’s way of conceiving the relationship between mathematics and other branches of scientific knowledge is completely different from the way a contemporary scientist conceives it. This is one of the causes of the fact that we look at the mathematical passage we find in Aristotle’s works with the wrong expectation. We expect to find more or less stringent proofs, while for the most part Aristotle employs mere analogies. Indeed, this is the primary function of mathematics when employed in a philosophical (...)
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  3. Aristotle and the Mathematical Tradition on Diastēma and Logos: An Analysis of Physics 3 3, 202a18-21.Monica Ugaglia - 2016 - Greek Roman and Byzantine Studies 56:49-67.
    ARISTOTLE'S PHYSICS 3.3 contains interesting evidence of an open debate in mathematics, concerning the interchangeability of the notions of diastēma and logos in the theory of harmonics. Because of the standard interpretation of the passage, however, this reference to harmonics has gone unnoticed: a slightly different understanding is proposed in this paper, which restores the relevance of the passage and its place in the contemporary debate.
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  4. Aristotle on Placing Gnomons Round.Monica Ugaglia & Fabio Acerbi - 2015 - Classical Quarterly 65 (2):587-608.
    The passage has been an object of scholarly debate: the lack of independent sources on the mathematical construction described by Aristotle, the terseness of the formulation and the resulting syntactical ambiguities make the exact interpretation of the text quite difficult, as already noted by Philoponus. What does it mean that the gnomons are ‘placed round the one and without’ (περὶ τὸ ἓν καὶ χωρίς)? And in what sense is this an indication of the even being ‘cut off, enclosed (ἐναπολαμβανόμενον), and (...)
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  5. Aristóteles e o Uso da Matemática nas Ciências da Natureza.Lucas Angioni - 2003 - In M. Wrigley P. Smith (ed.), Coleção CLE (Universidade de Campinas, Brazil). CLE. pp. 207-237.
    I discuss the issue whether Aristotle's philosophy of science allows the use of mathematical premises or mathematical tools in general for explanaing phenomena in the natural sciences. I thereby discuss the concept of "metabasis eis allo genos" as it appears in Posterior Analytics I.7.
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  6. Boundlessness and Iteration: Some Observations About the Meaning of Άεί in Aristotle.Monica Ugaglia - 2009 - Rhizai. A Journal for Ancient Philosophy and Science (2):193-213.
    The aim of the paper is to show that the iterative (local and atemporal) meaning of the adverb ἀεί has a function of primary importance in Aristotle’s system, and that its use is strictly connected with the technical use of the same term in mathematics.
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  7. Jacob Klein on the Dispute Between Plato and Aristotle Regarding Number.Andrew Romiti - 2011 - New Yearbook for Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy 11:249-270.
    By examining Klein’s discussion of the difference between Plato and Aristotle regarding the ontology of number, this article aims to spells out the significanceof that debate both in itself and for the development of the later mathematical sciences. This is accomplished by explicating and expanding Klein’s account of the differences that exist in the understanding of number presented by these two thinkers. It is ultimately argued that Klein’s analysis can be used to show that the transition from the ancient to (...)
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  8. Klein on Aristotle on Number.Edward C. Halper - 2011 - New Yearbook for Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy 11:271-281.
    Jacob Klein raises two important questions about Aristotle’s account of number: (1) How does the intellect come to grasp a sensible as an intelligible unit? (2) What makes a collection of these intelligible units into one number? His answer to both questions is “abstraction.” First, we abstract (or, better, disregard) a thing’s sensible characteristics to grasp it as a noetic unit. Second, after counting like things, we again disregard their other characteristics and grasp the group as a noetic entity composed (...)
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  9. Aristotle and Cantor: On the Mathematical Infinite.Joseph S. Catalano - 1969 - Modern Schoolman 46 (3):264-267.
  10. Mathematics and Metaphysics in Aristotle. Proceedings of the 10th Symposium Aristotelicum, Sigriswil, 6–12 September 1984. [REVIEW]Werner Beierwaltes - 1991 - Philosophy and History 24 (1/2):15-17.
  11. Aristotle's Philosophy of Mathematics.Hippocrates George Apostle - 1952 - University of Chicago Press.
  12. Aristotle and Mathematics: Aporetic Method in Cosmology and Metaphysics.John J. Cleary - 1995 - E.J. Brill.
    This book examines Aristotle's critical reaction to the mathematical cosmology of Plato's Academy, and traces the aporetic method by which he developed his own ...
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