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  1. added 2019-08-15
    The Unity of the Concept of Matter in Aristotle.Ryan Miller - 2018 - Dissertation, The Catholic University of America
    The difficulties often attributed to prime matter hold for all hylomorphic accounts of substantial change. If the substratum of substantial change actually persists through the change, then such change is merely another kind of accidental change. If the substratum does not persist, then substantial change is merely creation ex nihilo. Either way matter is an empty concept, explaining nothing. This conclusion follows from Aristotle’s homoeomerity principle, and attempts to evade this conclusion by relaxing the constraints Aristotle imposes on elementhood, generation, (...)
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  2. added 2019-07-05
    How Things Happen for the Sake of Something: The Dialectical Strategy of Aristotle, Physics 2.8.Emily Nancy Kress - 2019 - Phronesis 64 (3):321-347.
    I offer a fresh interpretation of the dialectical strategy of Physics 2.8’s arguments that things in nature happen for the sake of something. Whereas many recent interpreters have concluded that these arguments inevitably beg the question against Aristotle’s opponents, I argue that they constitute a careful attempt to build common ground with an opponent who rejects Aristotle’s basic worldview. This common ground, first articulated in the famous Winter Rain Argument, takes the form of an intriguing pattern of reasoning: that natural (...)
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  3. added 2019-06-19
    Aristotle on Kosmos and Kosmoi.Monte Johnson - 2019 - In Phillip Horky (ed.), Cosmos in the Ancient World. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. pp. 74-107.
    The concept of kosmos did not play the leading role in Aristotle’s physics that it did in Pythagorean, Atomistic, Platonic, or Stoic physics. Although Aristotle greatly influenced the history of cosmology, he does not himself recognize a science of cosmology, a science taking the kosmos itself as the object of study with its own phenomena to be explained and its own principles that explain them. The term kosmos played an important role in two aspects of his predecessor’s accounts that Aristotle (...)
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  4. added 2019-06-06
    Aristotle on Chance Processes. A Note on Physics II 4-6.Christos Y. Panayides - 2016 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 19 (1):21-51.
  5. added 2019-06-05
    Michael Psellos, Kommentar zur Physik des Aristoteles.Burkhard Mojsisch - 2008 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 13 (1):268-268.
  6. added 2019-03-23
    From Blood to Flesh: Homonymy, Unity, and Ways of Being in Aristotle.Christopher Frey - 2015 - Ancient Philosophy 35 (2):375-394.
    My topic is the fundamental Aristotelian division between the animate and the inanimate. In particular, I discuss the transformation that occurs when an inanimate body comes to be ensouled. When nutriment is transformed into flesh it is first changed into blood. I argue that blood is unique in being, at one and the same time, both animate and inanimate; it is inanimate nutriment in actuality (or in activity) and animate flesh in potentiality (or in capacity). I provide a detailed exposition (...)
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  7. added 2019-03-23
    Two Conceptions of Soul in Aristotle.Christopher Frey - 2015 - In David Ebrey (ed.), Theory and Practice in Aristotle's Natural Science. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 137-160.
    Aristotle outlines two methods in De Anima that one can employ when one investigates the soul. The first focuses on the exercises of a living organism’s vital capacities and the proper objects upon which these activities are directed. The second focuses on a living organism’s nature, its internal principle of movement and rest, and the single end for the sake of which this principle is exercised. I argue that these two methods yield importantly different, and prima facie incompatible, views about (...)
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  8. added 2019-03-23
    Capacities and the Eternal in Metaphysics Θ.8 and De Caelo.Christopher Frey - 2015 - Phronesis 60 (1):88-126.
    _ Source: _Volume 60, Issue 1, pp 88 - 126 The dominant interpretation of Metaphysics Θ.8 commits Aristotle to the claim that the heavenly bodies’ eternal movements are not the exercises of capacities. Against this, I argue that these movements are the result of necessarily exercised capacities. I clarify what it is for a heavenly body to possess a nature and argue that a body’s nature cannot be a final cause unless the natural body possesses capacities that are exercised for (...)
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  9. added 2019-03-01
    Aristotle’s Theory of Language in the Light of Phys. I.1.Pavol Labuda - 2018 - Aither. Journal for the Study of Greek and Latin Philosophical Traditions 10 (20/2018 - International Issue 5):66-77.
    The main aim of my paper is to analyse Aristotle’s theory of language in the context of his Physics I.1 and via an analysis and an interpretation of this part of his Physics I try to show that (i) the study of human language (logos) significantly falls within the competence of Aristotle’s physics (i.e. natural philosophy), (ii) we can find the results of such (physical) inquiry in Aristotle’s zoological writings, stated in the forms of the first principles, causes and elements (...)
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  10. added 2018-12-26
    The Eleatic Challenge in Aristotle’s Physics I.8.Scott O’Connor - 2017 - Rhizomata 5 (1):25-50.
    In Physics I.8, Aristotle outlines and responds to an Eleatic argument against the reality of change. I defend a new reading according to which the argu- ment assumes Predicational Monism, the claim that each being can possess only one property. In Phys. I.2, Aristotle responds to Predicational Monism, which he attributes to the Eleatics; I argue that he uses this response to distinguish coin- cidental from non-coincidental becoming, a distinction he employs in Phys I.8 to resolve the argument against the (...)
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  11. added 2018-12-03
    Apeiron jako substrat? Najstarsza krytyka monizmu Anaksymandra oraz jej metodologiczne uwarunkowania.Maria Marcinkowska-Rosół - 2015 - Diametros 43:103-117.
    The article deals with the oldest criticism of Anaximander’s monism, for which we have evidence, found in John Philoponus’ commentary on the first book of Aristotle’s Physics . Philoponus’ argumentation is analytically examined and explained, its premises brought to light and its conclusions evaluated. It is shown how his inquiry, although anticipating modern discussions about the classification of Anaximander’s doctrine in terms of ‘monism’ and ‘pluralism’, differs from the contemporary approach to the problem when it comes to both results and (...)
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  12. added 2018-12-03
    Necessity and the Physicalist Account in Aristotle’s Physics. Difficulties with the Rainfall Example.Jarosław Olesiak - 2015 - Diametros 45:35-38.
    The aim of the present article is to consider the shortcomings of the physicalist rainfall example set forth by Aristotle in Physics II.8. I first outline the ancient physicalist account of the coming-to-be of natural organisms and the accompanying rejection of the teleological character of such processes. Then I examine the rainfall example itself. The fundamental difficulty is that rainfall does not appear to have a proper nature. Hence it is not natural in the strict sense and cannot be used (...)
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  13. added 2018-11-03
    Aristotle as A-Theorist: Overcoming the Myth of Passage.Jacqueline Mariña & Franklin Mason - 2001 - Journal of History of Philosophy 39:169-192.
    Two things are often said about Aristotle's treatment of time in the Physics. First, that Aristotle's considered view of time is intrinsically tied to a language of temporal passage heavily dependent on the A-series. As such Aristotle's understanding of time is plagued with the perplexities that the A-series generates. Second, that the series of puzzles that Aristotle treats in IV.10, leading to the conclusion that time is non-existent, are left unanswered by Aristotle. Instead after presenting the puzzles having to do (...)
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  14. added 2018-09-14
    Change, Agency and the Incomplete in Aristotle.Andreas Anagnostopoulos - 2017 - Phronesis 62 (2):170-209.
  15. added 2018-08-19
    The Problem of Substantial Generation in Aristotle's Physical Writings.Michael Ivins - 2008 - Dissertation, Duquesne University
  16. added 2018-07-16
    Plato’s and Aristotle’s Answers to the Parmenides Problem.C. J. Wolfe - 2012 - Review of Metaphysics 65 (4):747-764.
    This paper explores Plato and Aristotle 's responses to the pre-Socratic philosopher Parmenides, who paradoxically said that there is no such thing as non-being, and no such things as change. I argue that Plato’s response would have been good enough to defeat the claim in a debate, thereby remedying the political aspects of the Parmenides problem. However, Aristotle ’s answer is required to answer some additional philosophical and scientific aspects. Plato's Sophist is a very difficult dialogue to understand; seeing it (...)
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  17. added 2018-06-05
    Being Itself and the Being of Being Reading Aristotle's Critique of Parmenides (Physics 1.3) After Metaphysics.Jussi Backman - 2018 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (2):271-291.
    The essay studies Aristotle’s critique of Parmenides in the light of the Heideggerian account of Platonic-Aristotelian metaphysics as an approach to being in terms of beings. Aristotle’s critique focuses on the presuppositions of the Parmenidean thesis of the unity of being. It is argued that a close study of the presuppositions of Aristotle’s own critique reveals an important difference between the Aristotelian metaphysical framework and the Parmenidean “protometaphysical” approach. The Parmenides fragments indicate being as such in the sense of the (...)
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  18. added 2017-11-21
    The Now and the Relation Between Motion and Time in Aristotle: A Systematic Reconstruction.Mark Sentesy - 2018 - Apeiron 51 (3):279-323.
    This paper reconstructs the relationship between the now, motion, and number in Aristotle to clarify the nature of the now, and, thereby, the relationship between motion and time. Although it is clear that for Aristotle motion, and, more generally, change, are prior to time, the nature of this priority is not clear. But if time is the number of motion, then the priority of motion can be grasped by examining his theory of number. This paper aims to show that, just (...)
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  19. added 2017-11-21
    Are Potency and Actuality Compatible in Aristotle?Mark Sentesy - 2018 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy:239-270.
    The belief that Aristotle opposes potency (dunamis) to actuality (energeia or entelecheia) has gone untested. This essay defines and distinguishes forms of the Opposition Hypothesis—the Actualization, Privation, and Modal—examining the texts and arguments adduced to support them. Using Aristotle’s own account of opposition, the texts appear instead to show that potency and actuality are compatible, while arguments for their opposition produce intractable problems. Notably, Aristotle’s refutation of the Megarian Identity Hypothesis applies with equal or greater force to the Opposition Hypothesis. (...)
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  20. added 2017-09-27
    The Hermeneutic Problem of Potency and Activity in Aristotle.Mark Sentesy - 2017 - In The Challenge of Aristotle. Sofia, Bulgaria: Sofia University Press.
    Of Aristotle’s core terms, potency (dunamis) and actuality (energeia) are among the most important. But when we attempt to understand what they mean, we face the following problem: their primary meaning is movement, as a source (dunamis) or as movement itself (energeia). We therefore have to understand movement in order to understand them. But the structure of movement is itself articulated using these terms: it is the activity of a potential being, as potent. This paper examines this hermeneutic circle, and (...)
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  21. added 2017-08-13
    Sobre o Hílemorfismo: corpo e alma como condição de possibilidade do viver.Suelen Pereira da Cunha - 2016 - Clareira: Revista de Filosofia da Região Amazônica 3 (2):22-34.
    O presente trabalho visa demonstrar como a relação entre corpo e alma são indispensáveis para o viver. Para tanto, considera a tese de que o ser animado é uma substância composta de matéria e forma, que também pode ser analisada sob a perspectiva de potência e ato. Neste sentido, o trabalho inicia com a compreensão sobre o que é uma substância, qual tipo de substância é o ser vivo para, em seguida, mediante as definições de alma presentes no livro Β (...)
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  22. added 2017-06-02
    Aristotle’s Physics 5.1, 225a1-B5.John Bowin - 2019 - Philosophical Inquiry 43:147-164.
    This contribution offers an interpretation of the last half of chapter 1 of book 5 of Aristotle’s Physics in the form of a commentary. Among other things, it attempts an explanation of why Aristotle calls the termini of changes ‘something underlying’ (ὑποκείμενον) and ‘something not underlying’ (μὴ ὑποκείμενον). It also provides an analysis of Aristotle’s argument for the claim that what is not simpliciter does not change in the light of this interpretation.
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  23. added 2017-04-04
    Motivationen i livet: Kinesis og Lebensbewegtheit.Jussi Backman & Henrik Jøker Bjerre - 2003 - In Dan Zahavi, Søren Overgaard & Thomas Schwarz Wentzer (eds.), Den unge Heidegger. Copenhagen: Akademisk Forlag. pp. 30-62.
    Translated into Danish by Henrik Jøker Bjerre.
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  24. added 2017-01-29
    A Física de Aristóteles: a techné e o caso da Música.Carla Bromberg - 2013 - In Simpósio Nacional de Tecnologia e Sociedade. Curitiba, Brazil: Simpósio Nacional de Tecnologia e Sociedade. pp. 1141-1149.
  25. added 2016-11-27
    Kommentar Zur Physik des Aristoteles.Burkhard Mojsisch - 2008 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 13 (1):268-268.
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  26. added 2016-10-05
    Aristotle on Parts of Time and Being in Time.Nathanael Stein - 2016 - Review of Metaphysics 69 (3):495-518.
    Aristotle opens his discussion of time in Physics 4.10-14 with a puzzle, an argument which purports to show that time does not exist, since its only parts – the past and future – do not exist. He does not discuss the puzzle again, and so we are left with the question of how he would or could solve it. A full solution would involve not only a justification of realism about time, but also an account of why the puzzle arises, (...)
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  27. added 2016-04-18
    Acaso, espontaneidade e regularidade natural: a teleologia aristotélica e seus pressupostos.Alfredo Storck - 2011 - In Alfredo Storck & Raphael Zillig (eds.), Aristóteles: ensaios sobre ética e metafísica. Linus Editores. pp. 215-239.
  28. added 2016-04-13
    Aristotle’s Method of Understanding the First Principles of Natural Things in the Physics I.1.Melina Mouzala - 2012 - Peitho 1 (3):31-50.
  29. added 2016-03-21
    Divine and Mortal Motivation: On the Movement of Life in Aristotle and Heidegger.Jussi Backman - 2005 - Continental Philosophy Review 38 (3-4):241-261.
    The paper discusses Heidegger's early notion of the “movedness of life” (Lebensbewegtheit) and its intimate connection with Aristotle's concept of movement (kinēsis). Heidegger's aim in the period of Being and Time was to “overcome” the Greek ideal of being as ousia – constant and complete presence and availability – by showing that the background for all meaningful presence is Dasein, the ecstatically temporal context of human being. Life as the event of finitude is characterized by an essential lack and incompleteness, (...)
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  30. added 2015-11-29
    Aristotle and the Ancient Puzzle About Coming to Be.Timothy Clarke - 2015 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 49:129-150.
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  31. added 2015-04-07
    Aristotle's Physics: A Collection of Essays.Robert Mayhew - 1993 - Review of Metaphysics 47 (1):153-155.
    A common theme uniting this excellent collection is that Aristotle in the Physics--both qua scientist and qua philosopher--is worthy of our attention and should be taken seriously. The ten essays, all of them new, cover much of the Physics. The choice of contributors was excellent. Many have written on similar topics in the past, and have here brought their expertise and insights to bear on the same issues as they appear in the Physics. The essays are uniformly of a high (...)
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  32. added 2015-04-06
    Sachs, Joe. Aristotle's Physics: A Guided Study.Edward Halper - 1997 - Review of Metaphysics 50 (3):687-689.
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  33. added 2013-12-08
    A Noção Aristotélica de Matéria.Lucas Angioni - 2007 - Cadernos de História E Filosofia da Ciência 17 (1):47-90.
    I discuss some of Aristotle’s scattered remarks from which one can construct his conception of matter. Aristotle seems to oscillate between two conceptions: one in which matter is the principle of becoming, another in which matter is a constituent element with no contribution for processes of becoming. Sometimes Aristotle takes matter as a thing independent in itself, and the correlated form is a feature that does not contribute to the matter’s essence, nor is a necessary condition for its existence. But (...)
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  34. added 2013-08-17
    Aristotle's Theory of Potentiality.Mohan Matthen - 2014 - In John P. Lizza (ed.), Potentiality: Metaphysical and Bioethical Dimensions. Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 29-48.
    In this paper, I examine Aristotle's notion of potentiality as it applies to the beginning of life. Aristotle’s notion of natural kinēsis implies that we should not treat the entity at the beginning of embryonic development as human, or indeed as the same as the one that is born. This leads us to ask: When does the embryo turn into a human? Aristotle’s own answer to this question is very harsh. Bracketing the views that lead to this harsh answer, his (...)
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  35. added 2013-07-10
    Aristotle on the Infinite.Ursula Coope - 2012 - In Christopher Shields (ed.), Oxford Handbook of Aristotle. Oxford University Press. pp. 267.
    In Physics, Aristotle starts his positive account of the infinite by raising a problem: “[I]f one supposes it not to exist, many impossible things result, and equally if one supposes it to exist.” His views on time, extended magnitudes, and number imply that there must be some sense in which the infinite exists, for he holds that time has no beginning or end, magnitudes are infinitely divisible, and there is no highest number. In Aristotle's view, a plurality cannot escape having (...)
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  36. added 2013-07-10
    ‘Aristotle’s Physics VII.3. 246a10-246b3’.Ursula Coope - 2012 - In S. Maso & C. Natali (eds.), Reading Aristotle Physics VII.3: ‘What is alteration?’.
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  37. added 2013-07-10
    ‘Change and its Relation to Actuality and Potentiality'.Ursula Coope - 2009 - In G. Anagnostopoulos (ed.), A Companion to Aristotle. Blackwells.
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