This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related

Contents
100 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 100
  1. O Espaço em Aristóteles: da bidimensionalidade do topos às seis diastaseis que definem os animais.Francisco Caruso - forthcoming - Anais de Filosofia Clássica.
    Within the general discussion of space and its dimensionality, Aristotle's position is of the greatest relevance, as one will have the opportunity to argue and discuss in this article.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Competing Roles of Aristotle's Account of the Infinite.Robby Finley - 2024 - Apeiron 57 (1):25-54.
    There are two distinct but interrelated questions concerning Aristotle’s account of infinity that have been the subject of recurring debate. The first of these, what I call here the interpretative question, asks for a charitable and internally coherent interpretation of the limited pieces of text where Aristotle outlines his view of the ‘potential’ (and not ‘actual’) infinite. The second, what I call here the philosophical question, asks whether there is a way to make Aristotle’s notion of the potential infinite coherent (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Aristóteles, Física.Carlos Humberto Gomes - 2023 - Lisbon, Portugal: Edições 70.
  4. Qualification in Philosophy.Boris Hennig - 2023 - Acta Analytica 39 (1):183-205.
    Qualifiers such as “insofar as” and “in itself” have always been important ingredients in key philosophical claims. Descartes, for instance, famously argues that insofar as he is a thinker, he is not made of matter, and Kant equally famously argues that we cannot know things in themselves. Neither of these claims is meant to be true without qualification. Descartes is not simply denying that humans consist of matter, and Kant is not simply denying that we know things. Therefore, we cannot (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Nature as an Instrumental Cause in Proclus.Rareș Ilie Marinescu - 2023 - Apeiron 56 (4):673-692.
    In this paper I focus on Proclus’ concept of the instrumental cause in his commentary on the Timaeus (In Tim.). Unlike earlier Neoplatonists who do not make much use of this type of causality, Proclus relates the instrumental cause to the hypostasis of nature (φύσις). The Demiurge uses nature as an instrument in his ordering and creation of the cosmos. How does Proclus arrive at this understanding of nature? I argue that the definition of nature as an instrumental cause is (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  6. Uma “exploração arqueológica” da ideia de vazio como recipiente a partir de Aristóteles, Physica 4.6 213a15-19.Gustavo Laet Gomes - 2021 - Journal of Ancient Philosophy 15 (2):77-103.
  7. Physikvorlesung Teilband 1: Bücher I–IV.Gottfried Heinemann - 2021 - Hamburg: Felix Meiner Verlag.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Thought, Choice, and Other Causes in Aristotle’s Account of Luck.Emily Kress - 2021 - Apeiron 54 (4):615-648.
    In Physics 2.4–6, Aristotle offers an account of things that happen “by luck” and “spontaneously”. Many of these things are what we might think of as “lucky breaks”: cases where things go well for us, even though we don’t expect them to. In Physics 2.5, Aristotle illustrates this idea with the case of a man who goes to the market for some reason unrelated to collecting a debt he is owed. While he is there, this man just so happens to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  9. Le langage. Lectures d’Aristote.Gazziero Leone (ed.) - 2021 - Leuven: Peeters.
    Even though Aristotle speaks often about language, his remarks do not fall within the province of any given discipline, let alone belong to the same subject matter or amount to a πραγματεία of their own. Rather, they are somewhat scattered across the Aristotelian corpus and are to be gleaned from a vast array of texts, including ethical and political writings (where language plays a remarkable role in shaping human sociability), treatises on natural history (where Aristotle outlines the physiology of phonation (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Le divin, les dieux et le mouvement éternel dans l’univers d’Anaximandre.Luan Reboredo - 2021 - In Rossella Saetta Cottone (ed.), Penser les dieux avec les présocratiques. Rue D’Ulm. pp. 97-111.
    On propose ici de clarifier ce qu’Anaximandre entendait par « le divin » et ce qu’il appelait des « dieux ». À partir d’une réévaluation des sources anciennes, on soutient que cette enquête peut aider à comprendre son modèle cosmologique et le problème des cataclysmes dans son système. Trois hypothèses sont avancées à cette fin : [i] que dans Physique, III, 4, 203b3 15, le syntagme τὸ ἄπειρον renvoie à une notion concrète de substrat infini ; [ii] que dans ce (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. A Necessidade da Privação na Física de Aristóteles.Patrícia Mara Rodrigues Silva - 2021 - Inconfidentia: Revista Eletrônica de Filosofia 5 (10):7-19.
  12. Aristotle's Physics VIII, Translated into Arabic by Ishaq ibn Hunayn (9th c.).Rüdiger Arnzen - 2020 - Berlin: Walter De Gruyter.
    Aristotle's theory of eternal continuous motion and his argument from everlasting change and motion to the existence of an unmoved primary cause of motion, provided in book VIII of his Physics, is one of the most influential and persistent doctrines of ancient Greek philosophy. Nevertheless, the exact wording of Aristotle's discourse is doubtful and contentious at many places. The present critical edition of Ishaq ibn Hunayn's Arabic translation (9th c.) is supposed to replace the faulty edition by A. Badawi and (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. The Concept of Motion in Ancient Greek Thought: Foundations in Logic, Method, and Mathematics.Barbara M. Sattler - 2020 - New York, NY, USA: Cambridge University Press.
    This book examines the birth of the scientific understanding of motion. It investigates which logical tools and methodological principles had to be in place to give a consistent account of motion, and which mathematical notions were introduced to gain control over conceptual problems of motion. It shows how the idea of motion raised two fundamental problems in the 5th and 4th century BCE: bringing together being and non-being, and bringing together time and space. The first problem leads to the exclusion (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  14. Physics I.6: A third and underlying principle.Andreas Anagnostopoulos - 2019 - In Katerina Ierodiakonou, Paul Kalligas & Vassilis Karasmanis (eds.), Aristotle's Physics Alpha: Symposium Aristotelicum. Oxford University Press. pp. 190-228.
    Physics I 6 addresses the question of the number of principles and motivates the need for an underlying principle in addition to the contrary ones argued for in chapter 5. Physics I 6 ends in aporia about whether there are two or three principles, an aporia which is resolved with Aristotle’s own account in I 7. This chapter focuses on two issues. First, it explores how Aristotle’s arguments for contrary and underlying principles give rise to the aporia. Second, it discusses (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Aristotle’s Physics 5.1, 225a1-b5.John Bowin - 2019 - Philosophical Inquiry 43:147-164.
    This contribution offers an interpretation of the last half of chapter 1 of book 5 of Aristotle’s Physics in the form of a commentary. Among other things, it attempts an explanation of why Aristotle calls the termini of changes ‘something underlying’ (ὑποκείμενον) and ‘something not underlying’ (μὴ ὑποκείμενον). It also provides an analysis of Aristotle’s argument for the claim that what is not simpliciter does not change in the light of this interpretation.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Albertus Magnus and Thomas Aquinas on What is “Better-Known” in Natural Science.John H. Boyer & Daniel C. Wagner - 2019 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 93:199-225.
    Aristotelian commenters have long noted an apparent contradiction between what Aristotle says in Posterior Analytics I.2 and Physics I.1 about how we obtain first principles of a science. At Posterior 71b35–72a6, Aristotle states that what is most universal (καθόλου) is better-known by nature and initially less-known to us, while the particular (καθ’ ἕκαστον) is initially better-known to us, but less-known by nature. At Physics 184a21-30, however, Aristotle states that we move from what is better-known to us, which is universal (καθόλου), (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. A Fault Line in Aristotle’s Physics.Arnold Brooks - 2019 - Ancient Philosophy 39 (2):335-361.
    In Physics 4.11, Aristotle says that changes are continuous because magnitude is continuous. I suggest that this is not Aristotle’s considered view, and that in Generation and Corruption 2.10 Aristotle argues that this leads to the unacceptable consequence that alterations can occur discontinuously. Physics 6.4 was written to amend this theory, and to argue that changes are continuous because changing bodies are so. I also discuss the question of Aristotle’s consistency on the possibility of discontinuous alterations, such as freezing.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Aristotle on Kosmos and Kosmoi.Monte Johnson - 2019 - In Phillip Sidney Horky (ed.), Cosmos in the Ancient World. New York: Cambridge University Press. pp. 74-107.
    The concept of kosmos did not play the leading role in Aristotle’s physics that it did in Pythagorean, Atomistic, Platonic, or Stoic physics. Although Aristotle greatly influenced the history of cosmology, he does not himself recognize a science of cosmology, a science taking the kosmos itself as the object of study with its own phenomena to be explained and its own principles that explain them. The term kosmos played an important role in two aspects of his predecessor’s accounts that Aristotle (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  19. How Things Happen for the Sake of Something: The Dialectical Strategy of Aristotle, Physics 2.8.Emily Nancy Kress - 2019 - Phronesis 64 (3):321-347.
    I offer a fresh interpretation of the dialectical strategy of Physics 2.8’s arguments that things in nature happen for the sake of something. Whereas many recent interpreters have concluded that these arguments inevitably beg the question against Aristotle’s opponents, I argue that they constitute a careful attempt to build common ground with an opponent who rejects Aristotle’s basic worldview. This common ground, first articulated in the famous Winter Rain Argument, takes the form of an intriguing pattern of reasoning: that natural (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  20. Alma e movimento em Aristóteles.Francisco Moraes - 2019 - Anais de Filosofia Clássica 13 (25):21-42.
  21. Sobre a tradução de enérgeia e entelékheia em Física III, 1-3.Luís Felipe Bellintani Ribeiro - 2019 - Anais de Filosofia Clássica 13 (25):57-69.
  22. Being Itself and the Being of Beings: Reading Aristotle's Critique of Parmenides (Physics 1.3) after Metaphysics.Jussi Backman - 2018 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (2):271-291.
    The essay studies Aristotle’s critique of Parmenides in the light of the Heideggerian account of Platonic-Aristotelian metaphysics as an approach to being in terms of beings. Aristotle’s critique focuses on the presuppositions of the Parmenidean thesis of the unity of being. It is argued that a close study of the presuppositions of Aristotle’s own critique reveals an important difference between the Aristotelian metaphysical framework and the Parmenidean “protometaphysical” approach. The Parmenides fragments indicate being as such in the sense of the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Aristotle’s theory of language in the light of Phys. I.1.Pavol Labuda - 2018 - Aither. Journal for the Study of Greek and Latin Philosophical Traditions 10 (20/2018 - International Issue 5):66-77.
    The main aim of my paper is to analyse Aristotle’s theory of language in the context of his Physics I.1 and via an analysis and an interpretation of this part of his Physics I try to show that (i) the study of human language (logos) significantly falls within the competence of Aristotle’s physics (i.e. natural philosophy), (ii) we can find the results of such (physical) inquiry in Aristotle’s zoological writings, stated in the forms of the first principles, causes and elements (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. The Unity of the Concept of Matter in Aristotle.Ryan Miller - 2018 - Dissertation, The Catholic University of America
    The difficulties often attributed to prime matter hold for all hylomorphic accounts of substantial change. If the substratum of substantial change actually persists through the change, then such change is merely another kind of accidental change. If the substratum does not persist, then substantial change is merely creation ex nihilo. Either way matter is an empty concept, explaining nothing. This conclusion follows from Aristotle’s homoeomerity principle, and attempts to evade this conclusion by relaxing the constraints Aristotle imposes on elementhood, generation, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. The Now and the Relation between Motion and Time in Aristotle: A Systematic Reconstruction.Mark Sentesy - 2018 - Apeiron 51 (3):279-323.
    This paper reconstructs the relationship between the now, motion, and number in Aristotle to clarify the nature of the now, and, thereby, the relationship between motion and time. Although it is clear that for Aristotle motion, and, more generally, change, are prior to time, the nature of this priority is not clear. But if time is the number of motion, then the priority of motion can be grasped by examining his theory of number. This paper aims to show that, just (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  26. Are Potency and Actuality Compatible in Aristotle?Mark Sentesy - 2018 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy:239-270.
    The belief that Aristotle opposes potency (dunamis) to actuality (energeia or entelecheia) has gone untested. This essay defines and distinguishes forms of the Opposition Hypothesis—the Actualization, Privation, and Modal—examining the texts and arguments adduced to support them. Using Aristotle’s own account of opposition, the texts appear instead to show that potency and actuality are compatible, while arguments for their opposition produce intractable problems. Notably, Aristotle’s refutation of the Megarian Identity Hypothesis applies with equal or greater force to the Opposition Hypothesis. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  27. Change, Agency and the Incomplete in Aristotle.Andreas Anagnostopoulos - 2017 - Phronesis 62 (2):170-209.
    Aristotle’s most fundamental distinction between changes and other activities is not that ofMetaphysicsΘ.6, between end-exclusive and end-inclusive activities, but one implicit inPhysics3.1’s definition of change, between the activity of something incomplete and the activity of something complete. Notably, only the latter distinction can account for Aristotle’s view, inPhysics3.3, that ‘agency’—effecting change in something, e.g. teaching—does not qualify strictly as a change. This distinction informsDe Anima2.5 and imparts unity to Aristotle’s extended treatment of change inPhysics3.1-3.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  28. A Hylomorphic Reading of Non-Genuine Qualitative Changes in Aristotle’s Physics VII.3.Fei-Ting Chen - 2017 - Apeiron 50 (2):247-275.
    Journal Name: Apeiron Issue: Ahead of print.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. Jean De Groot. Aristotle’s Empiricism: Experience and Mechanics in the Fourth Century BC. Las Vegas, NV: Parmenides, 2014. Pp. xxv+442. $127.00. [REVIEW]Richard DeWitt - 2017 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 7 (1):176-179.
  30. Chelsea C. Harry. Chronos in Aristotle’s Physics: On the Nature of Time. Dordrecht: Springer, 2015. Pp. xiii+75. $39.99. [REVIEW]Andrea Falcon - 2017 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 7 (2):395-397.
  31. The Eleatic Challenge in Aristotle’s Physics I.8.Scott O’Connor - 2017 - Rhizomata 5 (1):25-50.
    In Physics I.8, Aristotle outlines and responds to an Eleatic argument against the reality of change. I defend a new reading according to which the argu- ment assumes Predicational Monism, the claim that each being can possess only one property. In Phys. I.2, Aristotle responds to Predicational Monism, which he attributes to the Eleatics; I argue that he uses this response to distinguish coin- cidental from non-coincidental becoming, a distinction he employs in Phys I.8 to resolve the argument against the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  32. Aristotle's Measuring Dilemma.Barbara Sattler - 2017 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 52:257-301.
    This paper has two main goals: first, it reconstructs Aristotle’s account of measurement in his Metaphysics and shows how it connects to modern notions of measurement. Second, it demonstrates that Aristotle’s notion of measurement only works for simple measures, but leads him into a dilemma once it comes to measuring complex phenomena, like mo-tion, where two or more different aspects, such as time and space, have to be taken into account. This is shown with the help of Aristotle’s reaction to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  33. The Hermeneutic Problem of Potency and Activity in Aristotle.Mark Sentesy - 2017 - In Sentesy Mark (ed.), The Challenge of Aristotle. Sofia University Press.
    Of Aristotle’s core terms, potency (dunamis) and actuality (energeia) are among the most important. But when we attempt to understand what they mean, we face the following problem: their primary meaning is movement, as a source (dunamis) or as movement itself (energeia). We therefore have to understand movement in order to understand them. But the structure of movement is itself articulated using these terms: it is the activity of a potential being, as potent. This paper examines this hermeneutic circle, and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. The Middle Included - Logos in Aristotle.Ömer Aygün - 2016 - Evanston, Illinois, Amerika Birleşik Devletleri: Northwestern University Press.
    The Middle Included is a systematic exploration of the meanings of logos throughout Aristotle’s work. It claims that the basic meaning is “gathering,” a relation that holds its terms together without isolating them or collapsing one to the other. This meaning also applies to logos in the sense of human language. Aristotle describes how some animals are capable of understanding non-firsthand experience without being able to relay it, while others relay it without understanding. Aygün argues that what distinguishes human language, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  35. Sobre o Hílemorfismo: corpo e alma como condição de possibilidade do viver.Suelen Pereira da Cunha - 2016 - Clareira: Revista de Filosofia da Região Amazônica 3 (2):22-34.
    O presente trabalho visa demonstrar como a relação entre corpo e alma são indispensáveis para o viver. Para tanto, considera a tese de que o ser animado é uma substância composta de matéria e forma, que também pode ser analisada sob a perspectiva de potência e ato. Neste sentido, o trabalho inicia com a compreensão sobre o que é uma substância, qual tipo de substância é o ser vivo para, em seguida, mediante as definições de alma presentes no livro Β (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36. Alexander against Galen on Motion: A Mere Logical Debate?Orna Harari - 2016 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 50:291-236.
  37. Aristotle on Chance Processes. A Note on Physics II 4-6.Christos Y. Panayides - 2016 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 19 (1):21-51.
  38. Aristotle on Parts of Time and Being in Time.Nathanael Stein - 2016 - Review of Metaphysics 69 (3):495-518.
    Aristotle opens his discussion of time in Physics 4.10-14 with a puzzle, an argument which purports to show that time does not exist, since its only parts – the past and future – do not exist. He does not discuss the puzzle again, and so we are left with the question of how he would or could solve it. A full solution would involve not only a justification of realism about time, but also an account of why the puzzle arises, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  39. Aristotle and the Ancient Puzzle about Coming to Be.Timothy Clarke - 2015 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 49:129-150.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  40. Capacities and the Eternal in Metaphysics Θ.8 and De Caelo.Christopher Frey - 2015 - Phronesis 60 (1):88-126.
    The dominant interpretation ofMetaphysicsΘ.8 commits Aristotle to the claim that the heavenly bodies’ eternal movements are not the exercises of capacities. Against this, I argue that these movements are the result of necessarily exercised capacities. I clarify what it is for a heavenly body to possess a nature and argue that a body’s nature cannot be a final cause unless the natural body possesses capacities that are exercised for the sake of its naturequaform. This discussion yields a better understanding of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  41. From Blood to Flesh: Homonymy, Unity, and Ways of Being in Aristotle.Christopher Frey - 2015 - Ancient Philosophy 35 (2):375-394.
    My topic is the fundamental Aristotelian division between the animate and the inanimate. In particular, I discuss the transformation that occurs when an inanimate body comes to be ensouled. When nutriment is transformed into flesh it is first changed into blood. I argue that blood is unique in being, at one and the same time, both animate and inanimate; it is inanimate nutriment in actuality (or in activity) and animate flesh in potentiality (or in capacity). I provide a detailed exposition (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  42. Apeiron jako substrat? Najstarsza krytyka monizmu Anaksymandra oraz jej metodologiczne uwarunkowania.Maria Marcinkowska-Rosół - 2015 - Diametros 43:103-117.
    The article deals with the oldest criticism of Anaximander’s monism, for which we have evidence, found in John Philoponus’ commentary on the first book of Aristotle’s Physics . Philoponus’ argumentation is analytically examined and explained, its premises brought to light and its conclusions evaluated. It is shown how his inquiry, although anticipating modern discussions about the classification of Anaximander’s doctrine in terms of ‘monism’ and ‘pluralism’, differs from the contemporary approach to the problem when it comes to both results and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. Necessity and the physicalist account in Aristotle’s Physics. Difficulties with the rainfall example.Jarosław Olesiak - 2015 - Diametros 45:35-38.
    The aim of the present article is to consider the shortcomings of the physicalist rainfall example set forth by Aristotle in Physics II.8. I first outline the ancient physicalist account of the coming-to-be of natural organisms and the accompanying rejection of the teleological character of such processes. Then I examine the rainfall example itself. The fundamental difficulty is that rainfall does not appear to have a proper nature. Hence it is not natural in the strict sense and cannot be used (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44. Physics V–VI vs. VIII: : Unity of Change and Disunity in the Physics.Jacob Rosen - 2015 - In Mariska Leunissen (ed.), Aristotle's Physics: a critical guide. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 206–224.
    Aristotle offers several arguments in Physics viii.8 for his thesis that, when something moves back and forth, it does not undergo a single motion. These arguments occur against the background of a sophisticated theory, expounded in Physics v—vi, of the basic structure of motions and of other continuous entities such as times and magnitudes. The arguments in Physics viii.8 stand in a complex relation to that theory. On the one hand, Aristotle evidently relies on the theory in a number of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  45. Aristotle's Theory of Potentiality.Mohan Matthen - 2014 - In John P. Lizza (ed.), Potentiality: Metaphysical and Bioethical Dimensions. Baltimore: Jhu Press. pp. 29-48.
    In this paper, I examine Aristotle's notion of potentiality as it applies to the beginning of life. Aristotle’s notion of natural kinēsis implies that we should not treat the entity at the beginning of embryonic development as human, or indeed as the same as the one that is born. This leads us to ask: When does the embryo turn into a human? Aristotle’s own answer to this question is very harsh. Bracketing the views that lead to this harsh answer, his (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  46. Aristote, critique de Platon sur les causes.Karel Thein - 2014 - Chôra 12:15-46.
    The paper reconsiders Aristotle’s criticism of Platonic forms as causes together with its wider implications for the differences but also similiarities between the two philosophers. Analyzing the relevant texts of Metaphysics A 9 and Generation and Corruption II, 9, where Aristotle addresses the hypothesis of forms as put forward in the Phaedo, it discusses two interpretative options : that Aristotle takes these forms for an imperfect anticipation of formal causes, and that he sees them as an aborted attempt at grasping (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47. A Física de Aristóteles: a techné e o caso da Música.Carla Bromberg - 2013 - In Bromberg Carla (ed.), Simpósio Nacional de Tecnologia e Sociedade. Simpósio Nacional de Tecnologia e Sociedade. pp. 1141-1149.
  48. ‘Aristotle’s Physics VII.3. 246a10-246b3’.Ursula Coope - 2012 - In S. Maso & C. Natali (eds.), Reading Aristotle Physics VII.3: ‘What is alteration?’. Parmenides Publishing.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. Aristotle on the infinite.Ursula Coope - 2012 - In Christopher John Shields (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Aristotle. Oxford University Press USA. pp. 267.
    In Physics, Aristotle starts his positive account of the infinite by raising a problem: “[I]f one supposes it not to exist, many impossible things result, and equally if one supposes it to exist.” His views on time, extended magnitudes, and number imply that there must be some sense in which the infinite exists, for he holds that time has no beginning or end, magnitudes are infinitely divisible, and there is no highest number. In Aristotle's view, a plurality cannot escape having (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  50. Aristotle’s Method of Understanding the First Principles of Natural Things in the Physics I.1.Melina G. Mouzala - 2012 - Peitho 3 (1):31-50.
    This paper presents Aristotle’s method of understanding the first principles of natural things in the Physics I.1 and analyzes the three stages of which this method consists. In the Physics I.1, Aristotle suggests that the natural proper route which one has to follow in order to find out the first principles of natural things is to proceed from what is clearer and more knowable to us to what is more knowable and clear by nature. In the Physics I.1, the terms (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
1 — 50 / 100