Aristotle: Place

Edited by Caleb Cohoe (Metropolitan State University of Denver, University of Colorado Denver)
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  1. added 2019-08-15
    Perennial Symmetry Arguments: Aristotle’s Heavenly Cosmology and Noether’s First Theorem.Ryan Miller - forthcoming - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association.
    Attempts to find perennial elements in Aristotle’s cosmology are doomed to failure because his distinction of sub- and supra-lunary realms no longer holds. More fruitful approaches to the contemporary importance of Aristotelian cosmology must focus on parities of reasoning rather than content. This paper highlights the striking parallels between Aristotle’s use of symmetry arguments in cosmology and instances of Noether’s First Theorem in contemporary physics. Both observe simple motion, find symmetries in that motion, argue from those symmetries to notions of (...)
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  2. added 2019-06-19
    Aristotle on Kosmos and Kosmoi.Monte Johnson - 2019 - In Phillip Horky (ed.), Cosmos in the Ancient World. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. pp. 74-107.
    The concept of kosmos did not play the leading role in Aristotle’s physics that it did in Pythagorean, Atomistic, Platonic, or Stoic physics. Although Aristotle greatly influenced the history of cosmology, he does not himself recognize a science of cosmology, a science taking the kosmos itself as the object of study with its own phenomena to be explained and its own principles that explain them. The term kosmos played an important role in two aspects of his predecessor’s accounts that Aristotle (...)
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  3. added 2019-06-06
    The Nature of Place and the Place of Nature in Plato’s Timaeus and Aristotle’s Physics.Emma R. Jones - 2012 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 16 (2):247-268.
    I offer a comparison between Plato’s discussion of χώρα in the Timaeus at 48A–53C and Aristotle’s discussion of τόπος in Physics Book IV, arguing that the two accounts have more in common than has been suggested by Continental scholars. Τόπος and χώρα both signal what I call the impasse of place as the question of that which cannot be reduced to either the sensible or the intelligible, and which grounds such categories. Identifying this impasse reveals Plato’s and Aristotle’s accounts of (...)
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  4. added 2019-06-06
    Time Matter and Form: Essays on Aristotles Physics.David Bostock - 2006 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Space, Time, Matter, and Form collects ten of David Bostock's essays on themes from Aristotle's Physics, four of them published here for the first time. The first five papers look at issues raised in the first two books of the Physics, centred on notions of matter and form, and the idea of substance as what persists through change. They also range over other of Aristotle's scientific works, such as his biology and psychology and the account of change in his De (...)
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  5. added 2019-06-06
    The Order of Nature in Aristotle’s Physics: Place and the Elements. [REVIEW]Sheldon M. Cohen - 2000 - Philosophical Review 109 (4):636-639.
    In the Physics, 4.3.211b5-9, 212a2-6, Aristotle argues that place is “the limit of the surrounding body, at which it is in contact with that which is surrounded.” He then continues.
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  6. added 2019-06-06
    Aristotle on Natural Place: Some Questions.Robert R. Barr - 1956 - New Scholasticism 30 (2):206-210.
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  7. added 2019-05-20
    Dynamic Boundaries: Place in Aristotle’s Biology.Nathan Andersen - 2004 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 25 (1):5-29.
    Place, as Aristotle defines it, is to be sharply distinguished from merely geometrical space. Places, unlike geometrical spaces, are not indifferent to that which they contain. Indeed, they seem to have a kind of power. For unless something interferes, things gravitate naturally toward places that suit them. This power that Aristotle attributes to place is obvious not only in the case of elemental bodies, but much more so in the case of animals, whose very existence depends upon their inhabitation of (...)
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  8. added 2018-12-01
    Aristotle’s Science of Matter and Motion.Christopher Byrne - 2018 - Toronto, Canada: University of Toronto Press.
    Although Aristotle's contribution to biology has long been recognized, there are many philosophers and historians of science who still hold that he was the great delayer of natural science, calling him the man who held up the Scientific Revolution by two thousand years. They argue that Aristotle never considered the nature of matter as such or the changes that perceptible objects undergo simply as physical objects; he only thought about the many different, specific natures found in perceptible objects. Against this (...)
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  9. added 2018-09-06
    Defining Place. [REVIEW]Benjamin Morison - 2000 - The Classical Review 50 (2):493-495.
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  10. added 2017-09-03
    Helen S. Lang. The Order of Nature in Aristotle’s Physics: Place and the Elements. Xii + 324 Pp., Bibl., Index. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998. $80. [REVIEW]Monte Johnson - 2004 - Isis 95 (4):687-688.
  11. added 2017-04-03
    Why Continuous Motions Cannot Be Composed of Sub-Motions: Aristotle on Change, Rest, and Actual and Potential Middles.Caleb Cohoe - 2018 - Apeiron 51 (1):37-71.
    I examine the reasons Aristotle presents in Physics VIII 8 for denying a crucial assumption of Zeno’s dichotomy paradox: that every motion is composed of sub-motions. Aristotle claims that a unified motion is divisible into motions only in potentiality (δυνάμει). If it were actually divided at some point, the mobile would need to have arrived at and then have departed from this point, and that would require some interval of rest. Commentators have generally found Aristotle’s reasoning unconvincing. Against David Bostock (...)
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  12. added 2016-12-08
    Kant and Aristotle on the Existence of Space.C. J. F. Williams - 1985 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 25 (1):559-572.
    Kant asserts that we cannot represent to ourselves the non-existence of space. In his discussion of the Ontological Argument he maintains that there is nothing whose non-existence is inconceivable. He thus seems to contradict himself. If the non-existence of space is unthinkable, so is the non-existence of a part of space — a place. Indicating a particular place, we might say "There are no objects there", but it would be nonsense to say "There doesn't exist". We can say, as Aristotle (...)
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  13. added 2016-12-08
    A Ristotle on Zeno and the Now.F. R. Pickering - 1978 - Phronesis 23 (3):253-257.
  14. added 2016-11-15
    Dynamic Boundaries: Place in Aristotle’s Biology.Nathan Andersen - 2004 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 25 (1):5-29.
    “A boundary [peras] is not that at which something stops, but, as the Greeks recognized, the boundary is that from which something begins its presencing.” Martin Heidegger -/- Place, as Aristotle defines it, is to be sharply distinguished from merely geometrical space. Places, unlike geometrical spaces, are not indifferent to that which they contain. Indeed, they seem to have a kind of power. For unless something interferes, things gravitate naturally toward places that suit them. This power that Aristotle attributes to (...)
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  15. added 2014-03-20
    On Location: Aristotle's Concept of Place. [REVIEW]Elena Casetta & Achille C. Varzi - 2005 - Dialectica 59 (1):75–81.
    Benjamin Morison, On Location: Aristotle’s Concept of Place, Oxford University Press, 2002, 202pp, $45.00, ISBN 0199247919.
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  16. added 2014-03-12
    Space, Time, Matter, and Form: Essays on Aristotle's Physics - by David Bostock.Ursula Coope - 2008 - Philosophical Books 49 (3):250-251.
  17. added 2013-09-10
    Sexual Topologies in the Aristotelian Cosmos: Revisiting Irigaray’s Physics of Sexual Difference.Emanuela Bianchi - 2010 - Continental Philosophy Review 43 (3):373-389.
    Irigaray’s engagement with Aristotelian physics provides a specific diagnosis of women’s ontological and ethical situation under Western metaphysics: Women provide place and containership to men, but have no place of their own, rendering them uncontained and abyssal. She calls for a reconfiguration of this topological imaginary as a precondition for an ethics of sexual difference. This paper returns to Aristotelian cosmological texts to further investigate the topologies of sexual difference suggested there. In an analysis both psychoanalytic and phenomenological, the paper (...)
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  18. added 2013-03-30
    Monstrous Neighbors or Curious Coincidence: Aristotle on Boundaries and Contact.Paul Bartha - 2001 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 18 (1):1 - 16.
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