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  1. Aristotle’s Theory of Distributive Justice.David Keyt - 1991 - In David Keyt & Fred Miller (eds.), A Companion to Aristotle’s Politics. Oxford: Blackwell. pp. 238-78.
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  2. A Companion to Aristotle’s Politics.David Keyt & Fred Miller (eds.) - 1991 - Oxford: Blackwell.
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  3. Meritocracy and the Tests of Virtue in Greek and Confucian Political Thought.Justin Tiwald & Jeremy Reid - 2024 - Journal of Confucian Philosophy and Culture 41:111–147.
    A crucial tenet of virtue-based or expertise-based theorizing about politics is that there are ways to identify and select morally and epistemically excellent people to hold office. This paper considers historical challenges to this task that come from within Greek and Confucian thought and political practice. Because of how difficult it is to assess character in ordinary settings, we argue that it is even more difficult to design institutions that select for virtue at the much wider political scale. Specifically, we (...)
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  4. Review of Aristotle on sexual difference: metaphysics, biology, politics, by Marguerite Deslauriers. [REVIEW]Emily Kress - forthcoming - British Journal for the History of Philosophy.
    Aristotle (in)famously claims that “femaleness” is “as it were a deformity”, though “natural” (GA 4.6, 775a15-6), and that women’s deliberative faculties are “without authority” (Pol. 1.13, 1260a14). How are these claims – one biological, one political – to be understood? How (if at all) do they fit together? And how can Aristotle make them while also holding – as he seems to – that females are somehow valuable? -/- Deslauriers’ impressive new book takes on these questions. It defends two main (...)
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  5. Physis and Nomos in Aristotle's Ethics.Thornton Lockwood - 2005 - Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy Newsletter 12.
    The relationship between nature and normativity in Aristotle’s practical philosophy is problematic. On the one hand, Aristotle insists that ethical virtue arises through the habitual repetition of ethically good actions, and thus no one is good or virtuous by nature. Phusikê aretê or “natural virtue” is more like cleverness (demotes) than prudence (phronêsis) and it can result in wrong actions. Yet on the other hand, at times Aristotle appears to use nature to justify normative claims. Thus the problem with Aristotle’s (...)
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  6. Aristotle on Justice: The Virtues of Citizenship.Thornton Lockwood - manuscript
    Pascal famously wrote that Plato and Aristotle “ont écrit de politique c'était comme pour régler un hôpital de fous.” I argue that the best way of understanding Aristotle’s political thought is to see that although Pascal may be right about Plato, he is completely wrong about Aristotle—and that that difference in their political philosophies may provide resources for challenges we face today. The first five chapters of the book argue that Aristotle envisions the paradigmatic case in which the ethical virtue (...)
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  7. The Athenian Constitution. Aristotle - 1952 - New York, N.Y., U.S.A.: Penguin Books. Edited by P. J. Rhodes.
    Probably written by a student of Aristotle, The Athenian Constitution is both a history and an analysis of Athens' political machinery between the seventh and fourth centuries BC, which stands as a model of democracy at a time when city-states lived under differing kinds of government. The writer recounts the major reforms of Solon, the rule of the tyrant Pisistratus and his sons, the emergence of the democracy in which power was shared by all free male citizens, and the leadership (...)
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  8. Political Phantasies: Aristotle on Imagination and Collective Action.Avshalom M. Schwartz - forthcoming - American Journal of Political Science.
    This article provides a new account of the role of phantasia, imagination, in Aristotle's political thought. Phantasia plays a key role in Aristotle's psychology and is crucial for explaining any kind of movement and action. I argue that this insight holds for collective actions as well. By offering a reconsideration of the famous “Wisdom of the Multitude” passage, this article shows that the capacity of a multitude to act together is tied to its ability to share a collective phantasma: a (...)
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  9. Aristotle on intra- and inter-species friendship.Thornton C. Lockwood - forthcoming - In Sophia Connell (ed.), Philosophical Essays on Aristotle’s Historia Animalium.
    Although there is much scholarship on Aristotle’s account of friendship (φιλία), almost all of it has focused on inter-personal relationships between human animals. Nonetheless, in both Aristotle’s ethical and zoological writings, he documents the intra- and inter-species friendship between many kinds of animals, including between human and non-human animals. Such non-human animal friendships establish both an indirect basis for establishing moral ties between humans and non-human animals (insofar as we respect their capacity to love and befriend others) and a direct (...)
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  10. Carthage: Aristotle’s Best (non-Greek) Constitution.Thornton C. Lockwood - 2024 - In Luca Gili, Benoît Castelnérac & Laetitia Monteils-Laeng (eds.), Actes du colloque Influences étrangères. pp. 182-205.
    Aristotle’s discussions of natural slavery, ‘barbarian kingship’, and the natural characteristics of barbarians or non-Greeks are usually read as calling into question the intellectual, ethical, and political accomplishments of non-Greeks. Such accounts of non-Greek inferiority or inability to self-govern also appear to presuppose a climatic or environmental account that on the whole would imply severe limitations on the possibility of political flourishing for peoples living outside the Greek Mediterranean basin. In light of such accounts, it is somewhat astounding to find (...)
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  11. Aristotle on intra- and inter-species friendships.Thornton Lockwood - forthcoming - In Sophia Connell (ed.), Philosophical Essays on Aristotle’s Historia Animalium.
    Although there is much scholarship on Aristotle’s account of friendship (φιλία), almost all of it has focused on inter-personal relationships between human animals. Nonetheless, in both Aristotle’s ethical and zoological writings, he documents the intra- and inter-species friendship between many kinds of animals, including between human and non-human animals. Such non-human animal friendships establish both an indirect basis for establishing moral ties between humans and non-human animals (insofar as we respect their capacity to love and befriend others) and a direct (...)
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  12. Review of Duke, Aristotle and Law. [REVIEW]Thornton Lockwood - forthcoming - Metascience.
    Review of George Duke's Aristotle and Law. The Politics of Nomos (Cambridge University Press, 2020).
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  13. Scholarship on Aristotle's Ethical and Political Philosophy (2021-) [UPDATED OCTOBER 2022].Thornton Lockwood - manuscript
    I have sought to keep a running tabulation of all books, edited collections, translations, and journal articles which are primarily devoted to Aristotle’s ethical and political writings (including their historical reception but excluding neo-Aristotelian virtue ethics). Criteria for inclusion in this bibliography are: (1) published after January 1, 2021 (including pre-publication articles assigned a DOI); (2) devoted to one of Aristotle’s ethical or political works (e.g., Pol, EN, EE, MM, Athenian Constitution, Protrepticus); and/or (3) devoted to ethical or political concepts (...)
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  14. Aristotle on a Meaningful Life’ (Review paper of Andrius Bielskis, Existence, Meaning, Excellence: Aristotelian Reflections on the Meaning of Life, Routledge, London & New York 2017).Eleni Leontsini - 2019 - Studia Philosophica Wratislaviensia 14 (1):191-199.
  15. Egalitarian Aristotelianism: Common Interest, Justice, and the Art of Politics.Eleni Leontsini - 2021 - Φιλοσοφία/Philosophia. Yearbook of the Research Centre for Greek Philosophy at the Academy of Athens 1 (51):171-186.
    This paper aims to reevaluate Aristotelian political theory from an egalitarian perspective and to pinpoint its legacy and relevance to contemporary political theory, demonstrating its importance for contemporary liberal democracies in a changing world, suggesting a new critique of liberal and neoliberal political theory and practice, and especially the improvement of our notion of the modern liberal-democratic state, since most contemporary representative liberal democracies fail to take into account the public interest of the many and do very little in order (...)
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  16. Aristotle on a Meaningful Life (Review paper of Andrius Bielskis, Existence, Meaning, Excellence: Aristotelian Reflections on the Meaning of Life, Routledge, London & New York 2017).Eleni Leontsini - 2019 - Studia Philosophica Wratislaviensia 14 (1):191-199.
  17. Review of George Duke, "Aristotle and Law: The Politics of Nomos". [REVIEW]Jeremy Reid - 2021 - Philosophical Review 130 (4):583-587.
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  18. Biopolitics and Ancient Thought.Jussi Backman & Antonio Cimino (eds.) - 2022 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    The volume studies, from different perspectives, the relationship between ancient thought and biopolitics, that is, theories, discourses, and practices in which the biological life of human populations becomes the focal point of political government. It thus continues and deepens the critical examination, in recent literature, of Michel Foucault's claim concerning the essentially modern character of biopolitics. The nine contributions comprised in the volume explore and utilize the notions of biopolitics and biopower as conceptual tools for articulating the differences and continuities (...)
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  19. Aristotle’s Politics on Greeks and non-Greeks.Thornton Lockwood - 2021 - Review of Politics 83 (4):465-485.
    Scholars of race in antiquity commonly claim that Aristotle holds protoracist views about barbaroi or non-Greeks. But a careful examination of Aristotle's remarks in his Politics about slavery, non-Greek political institutions, and Greek and non-Greek natural qualities calls into question such claims. No doubt, Aristotle held views at odds with modern liberalism, such as his views about gender subordination and the exploitation of slave and nonslave labor. But claims that Aristotle holds protoracist views are regularly but erroneously asserted without careful (...)
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  20. Pellegrin, Endangered Excellence. On the Political Philosophy of Aristotle. [REVIEW]Thornton Lockwood - 2021 - Bryn Mawr Classical Review 10 (38).
    Pierre Pellegrin has devoted his scholarly life to the understanding of Aristotle the political philosopher, Aristotle the life-scientist, and—perhaps most importantly—Aristotle the analyst of life-science who is also a political philosopher. Like D. M. Balme, Allan Gotthelf, and James Lennox—Pellegrin is one of the foremost scholars who has sought to understand Aristotle’s biological writings in a philosophically and philologically sophisticated fashion. Pellegrin is also one of the foremost scholars who has sought to understand the intersection between Aristotle’s biological studies and (...)
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  21. In Praise of Solon: Aristotle on Classical Greek Democracy.Thornton Lockwood - forthcoming - In Eric Robinson & Valentina Arena (eds.), The Cambridge History of Democracy, Vol. 1: From Democratic Beginnings to c. 1350. Cambridge University Press.
    My chapter explores Aristotle’s account of classical Greek democracy in three parts. The first part examines the notion of democracy “taxonomically,” namely as a kind of political organization that admits of a number of normatively ranked “species.” The second part provides an overview of Aristotle’s historical remarks on Athenian democracy and a more focused analysis of his account of the political reforms that Solon introduced to Athens in the early 6th C., a form of political organization that Aristotle characterizes as (...)
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  22. Review of Riesbeck, Aristotle on Political Community. [REVIEW]Thornton C. Lockwood - 2021 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 141:297-298.
    Community (κοινωνία) is one of the most fundamental and distinctive concepts in Aristotle’s writings on human action; the political species of community (alongside spousal community, household community, and the community of friendship) is probably the most complicated iteration of the concept. Thus, scholars of Aristotle’s Politics (the primary audience of the volume under review) are much indebted to the publication of Riesbeck’s revised doctoral dissertation (University of Texas, Austin, 2012) that successfully and persuasively elucidates political community by showing both its (...)
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  23. Rediscovering Political Friendship: Aristotle’s Theory and Modern Identity, Community, and Equality, written by Paul W. Ludwig.Joel Alden Schlosser - 2021 - Polis 38 (2):358-362.
  24. Virtue, Knowledge, and Political Instability in Aristotle’s Politics: Lessons from the Eudemian Ethics.Benjamin Miller - 2021 - Polis 38 (2):261-276.
    I argue that we cannot fully understand Aristotle’s position on political stability and state preservation in the Politics with paying close attention to his Eudemian Ethics. We learn from considering the Politics and the Eudemian Ethics in concert that even ‘correct’ regimes are unstable when citizens do not possess full virtue. Aristotle introduces his formal account of the knowledge requirements for virtue in Eudemian Ethics 8.3, and he applies these knowledge requirements as an explanation for state decline in Politics 2.9 (...)
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  25. The Tyrant’s Progress: The Meaning of ΤΥΡΑΝΝΟΣ in Plato and Aristotle.Edmund Stewart - 2021 - Polis 38 (2):208-236.
    This article considers a longstanding problem: what does the word τύραννος mean? And if it means ‘bad / tyrannical ruler’, why are good rulers called tyrants? The solution proposed here is that tyranny is not a fixed state of being, or not being, but instead a gradual process of development. To be called a tyrant, a ruler need not embody all the stereotypical traits of tyranny. If tyranny is, by definition, unconstitutional and illegitimate rule, then there may be no clear (...)
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  26. Nemesis, Envy, and Justice in Aristotle’s Political Science.Robert Wyllie - 2021 - Polis 38 (2):237-260.
    Aristotle does not explain why ordinary citizens who lack the virtue of justice nevertheless praise justice and the law. Indignation, defined as pain at the undeserved gains of others, is a promising candidate in the list of means regarding virtues and passions in Book 2 of the Nicomachean Ethics. However, as many scholars have noted, Aristotle’s description of indignation as a mean is flawed. Moreover, indignation is the only characteristic in the list that disappears from the inquiry thereafter. I argue (...)
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  27. Aristotle's Politics (annotated bibliography).Thornton Lockwood - 2013 - Oxford Bibliographies Online (Classics).
    Annotated bibliography of Aristotle's Politics.
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  28. Further Reading on Aristotle's Politics.Thornton Lockwood - 2013 - In Marguerite Deslauriers & Pierre Destrée (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Aristotle's Politics. New York: Cambridge University Press. pp. 375-406.
    Topical bibliography of Aristotle's Politics, organized by books/subjects within the Politics.
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  29. Review of Bermon, Laurand, and Terrel, eds., Politique d'Aristote. Famille, régimes, éducation. [REVIEW]Thornton Lockwood - 2013 - Classical Review 63:366-368.
    The eight contributions in this volume result from three conferences held at the Université Michel de Montaigne Bordeaux 3 between 2005 and 2007 on nature and household relations, nature and regime-types (politeiai), and nature and education. Three of the chapters examine Aristotle’s notion of nature through consideration of his remarks about the household (specifically, the relationship between family relations and constitutions in cities, the critique of Plato’s dissolution of the family, and the different senses of nature in the Politics), two (...)
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  30. Review of Thomas Pangle, Aristotle's Teaching in the Politics. [REVIEW]Thornton Lockwood - 2014 - Classical Journal 5:02.
    At first glance, Aristotle’s Politics is a repository of dry, professorial lecture notes. Although the work contains the occasional literary reference or historical digression, analysis, argumentation, and socio-political taxonomies predominate. Beneath the surface of such prose, Pangle locates an Aristotle who seeks to involve the reader in dialogical exchange—much like as in a Platonic dialogue—by means of dialectical, rhetorical and literary devices. Pangle—a student of the political theorist Leo Strauss, a translator of Plato, Aristophanes and Sophocles, and the author of (...)
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  31. Review of Trott, Aristotle on the Nature of Community. [REVIEW]Thornton Lockwood - 2016 - Classical Journal 10:08.
    Aristotle's Politics claims that the polis or city-state "exists by nature" (Pol. 1.2.1252630). Thinkers as diverse as Marsilius of Padua, Thomas Hobbes, and Martha Nussbaum have struggled with how to interpret such a claim-some finding in it a salutary alternative to existing political theories, others finding in it the basis of deeply wrong-headed political thinking. In Aristotle on the Nature of Community, Adriel Trott seeks both to elucidate and to defend Aristotle's claim about the naturalness of the polis by interpreting (...)
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  32. Review of Johnson, Philosophy and Politics in Aristotle's Politics. [REVIEW]Thornton C. Lockwood - 2017 - Ancient Philosophy 37 (1):227-230.
    It is a truism that Aristotle distinguishes theoretical, practical, and productive sciences; but Aristotle’s Metaphysics begins with a discussion of the nature of the free person and his Nicomachean Ethics concludes with one of his clearest statement of the nature of theoria, so perhaps the boundaries between those sci-ences in existing works are more porous. Curtis Johnson, author of Aristotle’s Theory of the State (New York: Macmillan, 1990), in his current volume seeks to clarify the boundary between theoretical science (the (...)
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  33. Review of E. Rogan, La stásis dans la politique d’Aristote: la cité sous tension. [REVIEW]Thornton Lockwood - 2019 - Bryn Mawr Classical Review 9.
    In the introduction to her book-length study of Aristotle’s concept of “στάσις” (variously translated in English as civil war, revolution, faction, unrest, but which I will leave untranslated), Esther Rogan writes that “En France, un travail exhaustif et systématique restait donc à accomplir sur la stásis</i> chez Aristote, afin de prolonger et de faire se rejoindre les perspectives développées par Nicole Loraux et par Pierre Pellegrin, mais également afin d’inscrire les débats anglo-saxons dans le champ de la recherche française et, (...)
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  34. Comments on Garver's "Living Well and Living Together: The Argument of Politics VII: 1-3 and the Discovery of the Common Life".Thornton Lockwood - 2010 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 25:64-66.
    Professor Garver’s “Living Well and Living Together” sheds light on one of the more confusing sections in Aristotle’s Politics, namely the discussion of the best way of life for individuals and city in Politics VII.1-3. At a distance, the conclusion of Aristotle’s remarks seem relatively clear: He endorses the claim that the most choice-worthy life and happiness of a city and an individual are the same. Further, the implications of such a claim for Aristotle’s political philosophy also seem clear: Aristotle’s (...)
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  35. Aristotle’s Politics on Greeks and non-Greeks.Thornton Lockwood - 2021 - Review of Politics 84 (4):1-21.
    Scholars of race in antiquity commonly claim that Aristotle holds proto-racist views about βάρβαροι or non-Greeks. But a careful examination of Aristotle’s remarks in his Politics about slavery, non-Greek political institutions, and Greek and non-Greek natural qualities calls into question such claims. No doubt, Aristotle held views at odds with modern liberalism, such as defenses of gender subordination and the exploitation of slave and non-slave labor. But claims that Aristotle holds proto-racist views are regularly but erroneously asserted without careful consideration (...)
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  36. Aristotle’s Politics on Greeks and non-Greeks.Thornton Lockwood - 2021 - The Review of Politics 84 (4):1-21.
    Scholars of race in antiquity commonly claim that Aristotle holds proto-racist views about βάρβαροι or non-Greeks. But a careful examination of Aristotle’s remarks in his Politics about slavery, non-Greek political institutions, and Greek and non-Greek natural qualities calls into question such claims. No doubt, Aristotle held views at odds with modern liberalism, such as defenses of gender subordination and the exploitation of slave and non-slave labor. But claims that Aristotle holds proto-racist views are regularly but erroneously asserted without careful consideration (...)
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  37. The Aristotelian Legislator and Political Naturalism.George Duke - 2020 - Classical Quarterly 70 (2):620-638.
    Aristotle's assertion inPolitics1.2 that there is a natural impulse to form political communities is immediately contraposed with the claim that the person responsible for their foundation is the cause (αἴτιος) of the greatest of goods (Pol. 1253a33). The attribution of an essential role to the legislator as an efficient cause appears to clash, however, with Aristotle's political naturalism. If thepolisexists by nature and humans are by nature political animals (1253a1–2), then the question arises as to why active intervention by the (...)
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  38. Politics II: Political Critique, Political Theorizing, Political Innovation.Thornton Lockwood - 2015 - In Thornton Lockwood & Thanassis Samaras (eds.), Aristotle’s Politics: A Critical Guide. Cambridge, United Kingdom: Cambridge University Press. pp. 64-83.
    The second book of Aristotle’s Politics is generally taken to examine politeiai or constitutions that either exist in cities that are said to be well governed or were proposed by theoreticians and are thought to be well organized (II.1, 1260b30–32; II.12, 1274b26–28). Prominent are Aristotle’s examinations of Plato’s Republic and the constitution of Sparta; but Aristotle also devotes chapters to the examination of Plato’s Laws, the proposed constitutions of Phaleas of Chalcedon and Hippodamos of Miletus, and the existing constitutions of (...)
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  39. From ‘fugitive democracy’ to ‘fugitive justice’: Cultivating a democratic ethos.Caleb J. Basnett - 2021 - Contemporary Political Theory 20 (1):119-140.
    Sheldon S. Wolin’s ‘fugitive democracy’ is arguably his most provocative contribution to political theory. Breaking with the understanding of democracy as a constitutional form whose origins he locates in the work of Aristotle, Wolin claims democracy is better understood not as a constitution, but as a ‘rebellious moment,’ making democracy dependent on cultural rather than institutional characteristics. This formulation poses a problem for democracy as a political phenomenon, as political power today tends to be concentrated within institutions. Without institutional expression, (...)
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  40. Rewriting Contemporary Political Philosophy with Plato and Aristotle: An Essay on Eudaimonic Politics, written by Paul Schollmeier.Jonny Thakkar - 2021 - Polis 38 (1):157-161.
  41. Bemerkungen zum zoologischen Grundzug von Ökonomie und Politik bei Aristoteles.Sergiusz Kazmierski - 2016 - In Ivo De Gennaro, Sergiusz Kazmierski, Ralf Lüfter & Robert Simon (eds.), Wirtliche Ökonomie. Philosophische und dichterische Quellen [Hospitable Economics. Philosophical and Poetic Sources], Volume II, Elementa Œconomica 1.2. Nordhausen: Verlag Traugott Bautz. pp. 185-209.
    Wie an Politik I 2 in Verbindung mit anderen Passagen aus dem Corpus Aristotelicum, v.a. aus seinen zoologischen Schriften, gezeigt werden kann, ist die besondere Fähigkeit des Menschen, sich mitzuteilen, nicht ohne seine spezifische Zoologie denkbar. Ebensowenig ist daher die besondere menschliche Art, Haus- und Staatswesen zu bilden, ohne seine zoologischen Besonderheiten vorstellbar. Die menschliche Fähigkeit, sich mitteilen zu können, weist so in seine spezifische Art des Mitseins und eröffnet dadurch das, was er mitzuteilen vermag, z.B. Recht und Unrecht. Im (...)
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  42. Der Mensch als Lebewesen. Zum zoologischen Denken des Aristoteles.Sergiusz Kazmierski - manuscript
    Vortrag, gehalten am 11. November 2020 im Rahmen einer Ringvorlesung am Regensburger Zentrum für Klassikstudien zum Thema "Entfernte Verwandte - Mensch und Tier". Die aristotelische Bestimmung des Menschen ist ein Rätsel. Daher soll sie im Folgenden auch als ein Rätsel behandelt werden. Ziel ist es, hier nicht das bei Aristoteles finden zu wollen, was wir heute ohnehin schon über den Menschen als ein Lebewesen wissen oder zu wissen glauben, sondern es gilt im Folgenden von Aristoteles ahnen zu lernen, was wir (...)
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  43. Aristoteles' praktische Philosophie.George Boas & Albert Goedeckemeyer - 1923 - American Journal of Philology 44 (4):375.
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  44. Aristotle's Constitution of Athens.J. H. Wright & John Edwin Sandys - 1893 - American Journal of Philology 14 (2):226.
  45. Aristotle on the Nature and Politics of Medicine.Samuel H. Baker - 2021 - Apeiron 54 (4):441-449.
    According to Aristotle, the medical art aims at health, which is a virtue of the body, and does so in an unlimited way. Consequently, medicine does not determine the extent to which health should be pursued, and “mental health” falls under medicine only via pros hen predication. Because medicine is inherently oriented to its end, it produces health in accordance with its nature and disease contrary to its nature—even when disease is good for the patient. Aristotle’s politician understands that this (...)
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  46. Kritik über Horn & Neschke-Hentschke (2008): Politischer Aristotelismus. Die Rezeption der aristotelischen »Politik« von der Antike bis zum 19. Jahrhundert. [REVIEW]Andreas Kamp - 2008 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 13 (1):257-261.
  47. Law as Rational Constraint: Nicomachean Ethics x 9.George Duke - 2020 - Ancient Philosophy 40 (2):369-387.
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  48. Extending the Limits of Nature. Political Animals, Artefacts, and Social Institutions.Juhana Toivanen - 2020 - Philosophical Readings 1 (12):35-44.
    This essay discusses how medieval authors from the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries dealt with a philosophical problem that social institutions pose for the Aristotelian dichotomy between natural and artificial entities. It is argued that marriage, political community, and language provided a particular challenge for the conception that things which are designed by human beings are artefacts. Medieval philosophers based their arguments for the naturalness of social institutions on the anthropological view that human beings are political animals by nature, but this (...)
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  49. Richard Bodéüs’s The Political Dimensions of Aristotle’s Ethics_: 25 Years in Hindsight / _Le philosophe et la cité de Richard Bodéüs : rétrospective.Thornton C. Lockwood - 2020 - Dialogue 59 (1):1-4.
    Il y a vingt-cinq ans, j’étais un étudiant de doctorat intéressé par la philosophie d’Aristote et à la recherche d’un sujet de thèse. Au cours de mes études supérieures, j’ai eu la chance d’étudier l’Éthique à Nicomaque avec Rémi Brague et Les Politiques avec Judith Swanson. Ces deux érudits m’ont, à leur façon, fait prendre conscience de l’importance d’enquêter sur le public cible des œuvres d’Aristote. Tous deux parlaient en bien du livre Le philosophe et la cité (Les Belles Lettres, (...)
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  50. The Priority of the Good and the Contrapuntal Character of Aristotle’s Politics I.Thomas W. Smith - 2020 - Polis 37 (2):221-244.
    Politics I has been the subject of a number of textual questions about the relation of the Ethics to the Politics. These textual questions involve us in theoretical questions about the differences between contemporary and ancient conceptions of political rule. Resolving the exegetical challenges can help us clarify the theoretical differences. A fresh approach to the textual challenges reveals that Politics I has a contrapuntal character with two reinforcing movements. One explores why and how despotic conceptions of politics fail using (...)
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