This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories

26 found
Order:
  1. Two Dogmas That Many Readers of Aristotle’s Metaphysics Share.Sonderegger Erwin - manuscript
    Our everyday knowledge and the knowledge of the sciences are based on presuppositions of different fundamentality. The most general framework includes opinions about being, then the way a particular language sorts reality, precepts of logic, what Husserl called the natural attitude. Furthermore, specific content-related prerequisites and convictions are decisive in the individual sciences. Also modern readers of Aristotelian texts share some such specific convictions. I would like to speak of two of them here, since they are evidently false and considerably (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Biology and Theology in Aristotle's Theoretical and Practical Sciences.Monte Johnson - 2021 - In Sophia Connell (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Aristotle's Biology. Cambridge, UK: pp. 12-29.
    Biology and theology are interdependent theoretical sciences for Aristotle. In prominent discussions of the divine things (the stars and their unmoved movers) Aristotle appeals to the science of living things, and in prominent discussions of the nature of plants and animals Aristotle appeals to the nature of the divine. There is in fact a single continuous series of living things that includes gods, humans, animals, and plants, all of them in a way divine. Aristotle has this continuum of divine beings, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Living Without a Soul: Why God and the Heavenly Movers Fall Outside of Aristotle’s Psychology.Caleb Cohoe - 2020 - Phronesis 65 (3):281-323.
    I argue that the science of the soul only covers sublunary living things. Aristotle cannot properly ascribe ψυχή to unmoved movers since they do not have any capacities that are distinct from their activities or any matter to be structured. Heavenly bodies do not have souls in the way that mortal living things do, because their matter is not subject to alteration or generation. These beings do not fit into the hierarchy of soul powers that Aristotle relies on to provide (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. The Cause of Cosmic Rotation in Aristotle’s Metaphysics Xii 6-7.John Proios - 2020 - Ancient Philosophy 40 (2):349-367.
    In Metaphysics Λ.6-7 Aristotle argues that an unmoved substance causes the outermost sphere to rotate. His argument has puzzled and divided commentators from ancient Greece to the present. I offer a novel defense of Aristotle's argument by highlighting the logic of classification that Aristotle deploys. The core of Aristotle's argument is the identification of the unmoved substance on the 'table of opposites' as simple and purely actual. With this identification in place, Aristotle argues that the outermost sphere activates its capacity (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Aristotle on Divine and Human Contemplation.Bryan Reece - 2020 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 7 (4):131–160.
    Aristotle’s theory of human happiness in the Nicomachean Ethics explicitly depends on the claim that contemplation (theôria) is peculiar to human beings, whether it is our function or only part of it. But there is a notorious problem: Aristotle says that divine beings also contemplate. Various solutions have been proposed, but each has difficulties. Drawing on an analysis of what divine contemplation involves according to Aristotle, I identify an assumption common to all of these proposals and argue for rejecting it. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  6. Intelecto agente, motor inmóvil y Dios en Aristóteles.Alejandro Farieta - 2019 - Areté. Revista de Filosofía 31 (1):35-76.
    This article faces the classic problem of the interpretation of what Aristotle calls in de An. III, 5 “the intellect that produces all things”, which is commonly named agent intellect. Historically, there have been two approaches: one that goes back to Alexander of Aphrodisias, who associates the agent intellect with the unmoved mover and the divinity, and another one, associated with Theophrastus but whose major representatives are Philoponus and St. Thomas of Aquinas, who consider that agent intellect is an exclusively (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. The Unknown Mover.Myron Bradley Penner - 2019 - Philosophia Christi 21 (1):199-206.
    Andrew Shephardson contends in Who’s Afraid of the Unmoved Mover that the combined postmodern objections of Carl A. Raschke, James K. A. Smith, and me, to natural theology, fail. Here I focus only on the issue of idolatry and natural theology, as one way of demonstrating a fundamental inadequacy characteristic of Shephardson’s rebuttal of postmodern challenges to evangelical appropriations of natural theology. I argue that contrary to Shephardson’s contention, Acts 17 does not support evangelical appropriations of natural theology, but operates (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. General Revelation and the God of Natural Theology.Andrew I. Shepardson - 2019 - Philosophia Christi 21 (1):207-213.
    In Who’s Afraid of the Unmoved Mover? Postmodernism and Natural Theology, I defend natural theology against its postmodern evangelical detractors, including Myron Bradley Penner. Penner rejects natural theology because it attempts to ground knowledge of God in human reason, and he claims that my treatment of Acts 17:16–34 is fatal to my argument. However, Penner does not engage my explication of the doctrine of general revelation. The catastrophic effects that Penner perceives turn out to be only against a straw man (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. The Role of Aristotle’s Metaphysics 12.9.Dougal Blyth - 2016 - Méthexis 28 (1):76-92.
    Ch.9 of Metaph. 12 gives no support to the common view (against which I have argued elsewhere) that in ch.7 Aristotle identifies his Prime Mover not only as a god but also as an intellect. Rather, ch.9 approaches the divinity of intellect as a common belief (ἔνδοξον) from the Greek philosophical and poetic tradition (as at ch.7, 1072b23) that now requires dialectical testing. Here Aristotle initially establishes that there is a most active intellect (proposed ch.7, 1072b18–19: demonstrated ch.9, 1074b17–21, b28–9), (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Heavenly Soul in Aristotle.Dougal Blyth - 2015 - Apeiron 48 (4):1-39.
  11. The King of the Cosmos: Potentiality, Actuality, and the Logic of Sovereignty in Aristotle’s Metaphysics Λ.Jeffrey D. Gower - 2011 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (2):415-434.
    This paper offers a deconstructive reading of the pure actuality of the un­moved mover of Aristotle’s Metaphysics Lambda. Aristotle describes this first, unmoved principle of movement as a divine sovereign—the king of the cosmos—and maintains that the good governance of the cosmos depends on its unmitigated unity and pure actuality. It is striking, then, when Giorgio Agamben claims that Aristotle bequeathed the paradigm of sovereignty to Western philosophy not through his arguments for the pure actuality of the unmoved mover but (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Counting the Unmoved Movers: Astronomy and Explanation in Aristotles Metaphysics XII.8.Jonathan B. Beere - 2003 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 85 (1):1-20.
  13. Plato’s Form of the Beautiful in the Symposium Versus Aristotle’s Unmoved Mover in the Metaphysics.Kyung-Choon Chang - 2002 - Classical Quarterly 52 (2):431-446.
  14. A New Look at the Prime Mover.David Bradshaw - 2001 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 39 (1):1-22.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  15. The Holistic Presuppositions of Aristotle's Cosmology.Mohan Matthen - 2001 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 20:171-199.
    Argues that Aristotle regarded the universe, or Totality, as a single substance with form and matter, and that he regarded this substance together with the Prime Mover as a self-mover.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  16. In What Sense Is the Prime Mover Eternal?David Bradshaw - 1997 - Ancient Philosophy 17 (2):359-369.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. The Structure and Subject of Metaphysics Λ.Helen Lang - 1993 - Phronesis 38 (3):257-280.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  18. The Unmoved Mover Bernd Manuwald: Studien zum Unbewegten Beweger in der Naturphilosophie des Aristoteles. (Abhandlungen der geistes- und sozialwissenschaftliche Klasse, 1989.9.) Pp. 130. Mainz/Stuttgart: Akademie der Wissenschaften und der Literatur/Franz Steiner, 1989. Paper, DM 58. [REVIEW]J. D. G. Evans - 1992 - The Classical Review 42 (01):76-77.
  19. The Hidden Aporia in Aristotle's Self-Thinking Thought.Joseph P. Lawrence - 1988 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 2 (3):155 - 174.
  20. Is Aristotle's Prime Mover a Pure Form?Sheilah O'Flynn Brennan - 1981 - Apeiron 15 (2):80 - 95.
  21. Aristotle's Immaterial Mover and the Problem of Location in "Physics" VIII.H. S. Lang - 1981 - Review of Metaphysics 35 (2):321 - 335.
    IN Physics VIII, 10, Aristotle seems to commit a serious mistake: just before concluding that the first mover required by all motion everywhere remains invariable and without parts or magnitude, Aristotle apparently locates this mover on the circumference of the cosmos.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  22. "Aristotle's Theology: A Commentary of Book Lambda of the Metaphysics," by Leo Elders, S.V.D.Leo Sweeney - 1975 - Modern Schoolman 52 (2):211-214.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Aristotle’s Theology. A Commentary on Book Xii of the Metaphysics.R. S. - 1974 - Review of Metaphysics 27 (3):608-609.
    This is a careful, line-by-line and often word-by-word commentary on Book XII of the Metaphysics. The commentary is preceded by a seven part introduction which deals with the theology of Book XII, noûs, self-knowledge, desire, the place of the book in Aristotle’s writings, its date and structure, and the problem of Chapter 8 and Aristotle’s monotheism. Elders claims Chapter 8 was not written by Aristotle but by a disciple or disciples. He also claims that Book XII contains at least five (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. Two Theological Problems in Aristotle's "Met.Lambda" 6–9 and "de Caelo" A.9. Merlan - 1966 - Apeiron 1 (1):3 - 13.
  25. A Note on Aristotle's Discussion of God and the World.George A. Lindbeck - 1948 - Review of Metaphysics 2 (5):99 - 106.
    It will be recalled that Aristotle cites two examples of relations of this type: relations of knowledge and of vision, both of which are internal to the knower and seer, but external to the objects seen and known. However, neither of these relations can be the ones which exist between God and world for they are in a sense cul-de-sacs. Action is involved in their establishment, but they do not necessarily lead to further action, and so they cannot account for (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  26. Die aristotelische Auffassung vom Verhältnisse Gottes zur Welt und zum Menschen, von Dr. Eugen Rolfes. Berlin. Mayer & Müller. 1892. pp. iv. 202. 3 Mk. [REVIEW]F. Granger - 1892 - The Classical Review 6 (08):365-.