Aristotle: Time

Edited by Caleb Cohoe (Metropolitan State University of Denver, University of Colorado Denver)
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  1. Aristotle’s Physics: The Metaphysics of Change, Matter, Motion and Time.Philipp Blum - manuscript
  2. Considerações do Conceito de Tempo na Leitura do Livro IV da Física de Aristóteles.Marcos Jaques - manuscript
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  3. Aristotle and Einstein on Time.C. Evangeliou - unknown - Skepsis: A Journal for Philosophy and Interdisciplinary Research 13.
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  4. The Course of Time From Aristotle to Mulla Sadra.Seyyed Taheri - unknown - Kheradnameh Sadra Quarterly 12.
    Time, place and movement are three commonly-used terms in philosophy. By no means, however, are they the simplest concepts despite being bungled by shallow philosophers.Perhaps the oldest and yet one of the most credited explanations of time belongs to Aristotle. He defines time as a real, accidental thing with a continuous quantity which can be predicated by incorporeal beings.The Aristotelian time is merely a movement of spheres which cannot have the slightest effect even on its own trend.Avicenna's explanation of time (...)
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  5. El hysteron/proteron del tiempo - The hysteron/proteron of time.Diana Acevedo - forthcoming - Ideas y Valores. Revista Colombiana de Filosofía 65 (159).
    Aristotle's Physics 218b21-219a has been interpreted as proof that the concept of time is determined by the perceptive (or perceptual) conditions of the mind (psyche). In this paper I will criticize such an interpretation in order to argue that the mind's conditions for the perception and experience of time are just a starting point for the investigation: what is prior and nearer to sense, and better known to man (Anal. Post. I, 2). The arrival point of Aristotle's investigation about the (...)
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  6. Aristotle's Definition of Time: A Modest Proposal.J. Thorp - forthcoming - presented at The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy, APA Central Division Conference.
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  7. The Cause of Cosmic Rotation in Aristotle’s Metaphysics Xii 6-7.John Proios - 2020 - Ancient Philosophy 40 (2):349-367.
    In Metaphysics Λ.6-7 Aristotle argues that an unmoved substance causes the outermost sphere to rotate. His argument has puzzled and divided commentators from ancient Greece to the present. I offer a novel defense of Aristotle's argument by highlighting the logic of classification that Aristotle deploys. The core of Aristotle's argument is the identification of the unmoved substance on the 'table of opposites' as simple and purely actual. With this identification in place, Aristotle argues that the outermost sphere activates its capacity (...)
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  8. A Fault Line in Aristotle’s Physics.Arnold Brooks - 2019 - Ancient Philosophy 39 (2):335-361.
    In Physics 4.11, Aristotle says that changes are continuous because magnitude is continuous. I suggest that this is not Aristotle’s considered view, and that in Generation and Corruption 2.10 Aristotle argues that this leads to the unacceptable consequence that alterations can occur discontinuously. Physics 6.4 was written to amend this theory, and to argue that changes are continuous because changing bodies are so. I also discuss the question of Aristotle’s consistency on the possibility of discontinuous alterations, such as freezing.
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  9. Al-Kindī’s Argument for the Finitude of Time in His Critique of Aristotle’s Theory of the Eternity of the World in the Treatise on First Philosophy: The Role of the Perceiving Soul and the Relation Between Sensation and Intellection.Ahmed Abdel Meguid - 2018 - Journal of Islamic Studies 29 (3):323-356.
    The study presents a new interpretation of Abū Yaʿqūb al-Kindī’s refutation, in the Treatise on First Philosophy, of Aristotle’s theory of the eternity of the world. Critiquing Herbert Davidson’s classical position that al-Kindī’s three refutations in the Treatise are reformulations of John Philoponus’s in the Contra Aristotelem, the study shows that while al-Kindī’s first and third proofs intersect with Philoponus’s the second one does not. The first part of the study examines the concept of perceptual being and shows that al-Kindī’s (...)
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  10. Why Continuous Motions Cannot Be Composed of Sub-Motions: Aristotle on Change, Rest, and Actual and Potential Middles.Caleb Cohoe - 2018 - Apeiron 51 (1):37-71.
    I examine the reasons Aristotle presents in Physics VIII 8 for denying a crucial assumption of Zeno’s dichotomy paradox: that every motion is composed of sub-motions. Aristotle claims that a unified motion is divisible into motions only in potentiality (δυνάμει). If it were actually divided at some point, the mobile would need to have arrived at and then have departed from this point, and that would require some interval of rest. Commentators have generally found Aristotle’s reasoning unconvincing. Against David Bostock (...)
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  11. Anzahl Und Ausmaß. Die Griechisch-Arabisch-Lateinische Rezeption der Aristotelischen Zeitdefinition.Andreas Lammer - 2018 - Das Mittelalter 23 (1):109-127.
    This paper traces the reception of the Aristotelian definition of time from its earliest to its most authoritative interpretations, and describes how their readings pave the way for a sophisticated amalgamation of divergent Aristotelian and Platonic elements in the temporal theory of Avicenna. The focus of attention lies on specific perceptions of the relation between time and motion, more precisely on the contrary descriptions of time as the measure of motion and motion as the measure of time. The latter leads (...)
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  12. The Now and the Relation Between Motion and Time in Aristotle: A Systematic Reconstruction.Mark Sentesy - 2018 - Apeiron 51 (3):279-323.
    This paper reconstructs the relationship between the now, motion, and number in Aristotle to clarify the nature of the now, and, thereby, the relationship between motion and time. Although it is clear that for Aristotle motion, and, more generally, change, are prior to time, the nature of this priority is not clear. But if time is the number of motion, then the priority of motion can be grasped by examining his theory of number. This paper aims to show that, just (...)
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  13. Change, Agency and the Incomplete in Aristotle.Andreas Anagnostopoulos - 2017 - Phronesis 62 (2):170-209.
    Aristotle’s most fundamental distinction between changes and other activities is not that ofMetaphysicsΘ.6, between end-exclusive and end-inclusive activities, but one implicit inPhysics3.1’s definition of change, between the activity of something incomplete and the activity of something complete. Notably, only the latter distinction can account for Aristotle’s view, inPhysics3.3, that ‘agency’—effecting change in something, e.g. teaching—does not qualify strictly as a change. This distinction informsDe Anima2.5 and imparts unity to Aristotle’s extended treatment of change inPhysics3.1-3.
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  14. Aristotle on the Perception and Cognition of Time.John Bowin - 2017 - In In History of Philosophy of Mind: Pre-Socratics to Augustine. London: Routledge.
    Aristotle recognizes two modes of apprehending time, viz., perceiving time and grasping time intellectually. This chapter clarifies what is and is not involved in these two modes of apprehending time. It also clarifies the way in which they interact, and argues that, according to Aristotle, one’s intellectual grasp of time has an effect on one’s perception of time for those beings who have intellect.
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  15. Chelsea C. Harry. Chronos in Aristotle’s Physics: On the Nature of Time. Dordrecht: Springer, 2015. Pp. Xiii+75. $39.99. [REVIEW]Andrea Falcon - 2017 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 7 (2):395-397.
  16. Walter Burley on the Incipit and Desinit of an Instant of Time.Cecilia Trifogli - 2017 - Vivarium 55 (1-3):85-102.
    Walter Burley is the author of a treatise, entitled De primo et ultimo instanti, which is regarded as the most popular medieval work on the problem of assigning first and last instants of being to permanent things. In this paper, however, the author does not deal with this treatise directly. She looks instead at Burley’s Physics commentary to see how he applies the ideas presented in De primo et ultimo instanti to the solution of an Aristotelian puzzle about the ceasing (...)
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  17. Aristotle on Parts of Time and Being in Time.Nathanael Stein - 2016 - Review of Metaphysics 69 (3):495-518.
    Aristotle opens his discussion of time in Physics 4.10-14 with a puzzle, an argument which purports to show that time does not exist, since its only parts – the past and future – do not exist. He does not discuss the puzzle again, and so we are left with the question of how he would or could solve it. A full solution would involve not only a justification of realism about time, but also an account of why the puzzle arises, (...)
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  18. Iamblichus’ Response to Aristotle’s and Pseudo-Archytas’ Theories of Time.Sergey Trostyanskiy - 2016 - Forum Philosophicum: International Journal for Philosophy 21 (2):187-212.
    This article aims to shed light on certain aspects of Iamblichus’ theory of time that have not been sufficiently examined to date in the scholarly literature. As of today, there are a mere handful of scholarly works tackling Iamblichus’ solutions to the paradoxes of time in particular, and his contribution to the developments of the Neoplatonic theory of the subject more generally. This article attempts to redress the lack of literature on this topic by examining Iamblichus’ response to Aristotle’s and (...)
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  19. The hysteron/proteron of Time.Diana María Acevedo Zapata - 2015 - Ideas Y Valores 64 (159):33-46.
    El pasaje de la Física ha llevado a postular un concepto de tiempo determinado por las condiciones perceptivas de la psyche. Se muestra cómo las condiciones de percepción son un punto de partida en la investigación: lo que es primero y más cercano a los sentidos y más conocido para los seres humanos. El punto de llegada es la conexión necesaria entre la existencia del tiempo y la del cambio. La percepción del cambio de los durmientes de Cerdeña permite determinar (...)
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  20. On the Time of the Intellect: The Interpretation of De Anima 3.6 in Renaissance and Early Modern Italian Philosophy.Olivier Dubouclez - 2015 - Early Science and Medicine 20 (1):1-26.
    This article argues that an original debate over the relationship between time and the intellect took place in Northern Italy in the second half of the sixteenth century, which was part of a broader reflection on the temporality of human mental acts. While human intellectual activity was said to be ‘above time’ during the Middle Ages, Renaissance scholars such as Marcantonio Genua, Giulio Castellani, Antonio Montecatini and Francesco Piccolomini, greatly influenced by the Simplician and Alexandrist interpretations of Aristotle’s works, proposed (...)
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  21. Chronos in Aristotle’s Physics.Chelsea Harry - 2015 - Dordrecht: Springer International Publishing.
    This book is a contribution both to Aristotle studies and to the philosophy of nature, and not only offers a thorough text based account of time as modally potentiality in Aristotle’s account, but also clarifies the process of “actualizing time” as taking time and looks at the implications of conceiving a world without actual time. It speaks to the resurgence of interest in Aristotle’s natural philosophy and will become an important resource for anyone interested in Aristotle’s theory of time, of (...)
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  22. Taking Time.Chelsea Harry - 2015 - In Chronos in Aristotle’s Physics. Dordrecht: Springer Verlag. pp. 51-67.
    Despite the language we saw in the previous chapter, which allowed for time apprehension by perception and marking, in Physics iv 14, Aristotle famously argues that time is dependent on nous.
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  23. Chronos in Aristotle's Physics: On the Nature of Time.Chelsea C. Harry - 2015 - Springer.
    Chronos in Aristotle’s Physics: On the Nature of Time argues that Aristotle’s Treatise on Time (Physics iv 10-14) is a highly contextualized account of time in so far as it is not a treatment of time qua time but a parallel account to Aristotle’s foregoing studies of nature, principles (192b13-22), motion (201a10-11), infinite (iii 4-8), place (iv 1-5), and void (iv 6-9) in the Physics i-iv 9. It offers a reading of Physics iv 10-11 with the aim of showing that (...)
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  24. Change, Event, and Temporal Points of View.Antti Hautamäki - 2015 - In Margarita Vázquez Campos & Antonio Manuel Liz Gutiérrez (eds.), Temporal Points of View. Springer. pp. 197-221.
    A “conceptual spaces” approach is used to formalize Aristotle’s main intuitions about time and change, and other ideas about temporal points of view. That approach has been used in earlier studies about points of view. Properties of entities are represented by locations in multidimensional conceptual spaces; and concepts of entities are identified with subsets or regions of conceptual spaces. The dimensions of the spaces, called “determinables”, are qualities in a very general sense. A temporal element is introduced by adding a (...)
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  25. Why Is Time ‘Something Of Motion’ For Aristotle?Lorenzo Lazzarini - 2015 - Philosophical Inquiry 39 (2):2-14.
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  26. Aristotle's Physics: A Critical Guide.Mariska Leunissen (ed.) - 2015 - Cambridge University Press.
    Aristotle's study of the natural world plays a tremendously important part in his philosophical thought. He was very interested in the phenomena of motion, causation, place and time, and teleology, and his theoretical materials in this area are collected in his Physics, a treatise of eight books which has been very influential on later thinkers. This volume of new essays provides cutting-edge research on Aristotle's Physics, taking into account recent changes in the field of Aristotle in terms of its understanding (...)
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  27. Aristotle’s Theory of Time in the Light of the Phenomenological Tradition.Vitali Terletsky - 2015 - Sententiae 32 (1):100-117.
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  28. Ho Pote on Esti and Coupled Entities: A Form of Explanation in Aristotle's Natural Philosophy.Harvey Lederman - 2014 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 46:109-64.
    The difficult phrase ὅ ποτε ὄν ἐστι (hereafter ‘OPO’), which occurs in key passages in Aristotle’s discussions of blood and of time, has long vexed interpreters of Aristotle. This paper proposes a new interpretation of OPO, which resolves some textual and interpretative problems about Aristotle’s theories of blood and of time. My interpretation will also shed light on more general issues in Aristotle’s metaphysics. In the passages I will discuss, Aristotle takes both blood and time to be examples of his (...)
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  29. Aristotle on Primary Time in Physics 6.Benjamin Morison - 2013 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 45:149.
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  30. Aristotle: Movement and the Structure of Being.Mark Sentesy - 2013 - Dissertation, Boston College
    This project sets out to answer the following question: according to Aristotle, what does movement contribute to or change about being? The first part works through the argument for the existence of movement in the Physics. This argument includes distinctive innovations in the structure of being, notably the simultaneous unity and manyness of being: while material and form are one thing, they are two in being. This makes it possible for Aristotle to argue that movement is not intrinsically related to (...)
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  31. How to Save Aristotle From Modal Collapse.Derek von Barandy - 2013 - Studia Neoaristotelica 10 (1):89-98.
    On Jaakko Hintikka’s understanding of Aristotle’s modal thought, Aristotle is committed to a version of the Principle of Plenitude, which is the thesis that no genuine possibility will go unactualized in an infinity of time. If in fact Aristotle endorses the Principle of Plenitude, everything becomes necessary. Despite the strong evidence that Aristotle indeed accepts that Principle of Plenitude, there are key texts in which Aristotle seems to contradict it. On Hintikka’s final word on the matter, Aristotle either endorses the (...)
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  32. Aristotle on the Infinite.Ursula Coope - 2012 - In Christopher Shields (ed.), Oxford Handbook of Aristotle. Oxford University Press. pp. 267.
    In Physics, Aristotle starts his positive account of the infinite by raising a problem: “[I]f one supposes it not to exist, many impossible things result, and equally if one supposes it to exist.” His views on time, extended magnitudes, and number imply that there must be some sense in which the infinite exists, for he holds that time has no beginning or end, magnitudes are infinitely divisible, and there is no highest number. In Aristotle's view, a plurality cannot escape having (...)
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  33. Tiempo lógico y tiempo real.Indalecio García - 2012 - Ontology Studies: Cuadernos de Ontología:289-301.
    Aristotle describes time as continuous (cf. Phys. 219a 10-15). We argue here, first, that the time's continuity and magnitude's continuity differ, even though time's continuity depends on magnitude: actually a magnitude can be divided, that is, can fail to be continuous, but not time: time can be never actually divided, because an actual division in time would imply something like a real point in which time is denied, and that is impossible according to Aristotle (cf. Phys. 251b 10-28). The only (...)
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  34. Aristotle on Time.Errol G. Katayama - 2012 - Ancient Philosophy 32 (1):202-206.
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  35. Aristotle on Time: A Study of the Physics. [REVIEW]Errol G. Katayama - 2012 - Ancient Philosophy 32 (1):202-206.
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  36. Tony Roark , Aristotle on Time: A Study of the Physics . Reviewed By.Jon McGinnis - 2012 - Philosophy in Review 32 (6):518-520.
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  37. Aristotle on Time: A Study of the Physics (Review).Julie E. Ponesse - 2012 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 50 (3):453-454.
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  38. Motion and Change in Aristotle’s Physics 5. 1.Jacob Rosen - 2012 - Phronesis 57 (1):63-99.
    Abstract This paper illustrates how Aristotle's topological theses about change in Physics 5-6 can help address metaphysical issues. Two distinctions from Physics 5. 1 are discussed: changing per se versus changing per aliud ; motion versus change. Change from white to black is motion and alteration, whereas change from white to not white is neither. But is not every change from white to black identical with a change from white to not white? Theses from Physics 6 refute the identity. Is (...)
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  39. From Aristotle to Strato of Lampsacus : The Translatio of the Notion of Time in the Early Peripatetic Tradition.Francesco Verde - 2012 - In Marco Sgarbi (ed.), Translatio Studiorum: Ancient, Medieval and Modern Bearers of Intellectual History. Brill.
  40. Plato’s and Aristotle’s Answers to the Parmenides Problem.C. J. Wolfe - 2012 - Review of Metaphysics 65 (4):747-764.
    This paper explores Plato and Aristotle 's responses to the pre-Socratic philosopher Parmenides, who paradoxically said that there is no such thing as non-being, and no such things as change. I argue that Plato’s response would have been good enough to defeat the claim in a debate, thereby remedying the political aspects of the Parmenides problem. However, Aristotle ’s answer is required to answer some additional philosophical and scientific aspects. Plato's Sophist is a very difficult dialogue to understand; seeing it (...)
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  41. The Enigmatic Reality of Time: Aristotle, Plotinus and Today. [REVIEW]Ian Crystal - 2011 - Ancient Philosophy 31 (1):235-237.
  42. Souls and the Location of Time in Physics IV 14, 223a16–223a29.Tim Loughlin - 2011 - Apeiron 44 (4):307-325.
    In Physics IV 14, 223a16-223a29 Aristotle raises two questions: (Q1) How is time related to the soul? (Q2) Why is time thought to be in everything? Aristotle's juxtaposition of these questions indicates some relation between them. I argue that Aristotle is committed to the claim that time only exists where change is countable. Aristotle must answer (Q2) in a way that doesn't conflict with this commitment. Aristotle's answer to (Q1) offers him such a way. Since time is change qua countable, (...)
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  43. Aristotle on Time: A Study of the Physics.Tony Roark - 2011 - Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Preface; Introduction; Part I. Times New and Old: 1. McTaggart's systems; 2. Countenancing the Doxai; Part II. The Mater of Time: Motion: 3. Time is not motion; 4. Aristotelian motion (Kinesis); 5. 'The before and after in motion'; Part III. The Form of Time: Perception: 6. Number (Arithmos) and perception (Aisthesis); 7. On a moment's notice; 8. The role of imagination; 9. Time and the common perceptibles; 10. The hylomorphic interpretation illustrated; Part IV. Simultaneity and Temporal (...)
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  44. Tiempo y cambio. Física IV, 10-14.Diana Acevedo - 2010 - Dissertation, Pontifica Universidad Javeriana
    The problem of time has been present throughout history of philosophy since its beginnings. However to consider what is time is not a matter of technical theorization, conversely, this results interesting in as much as a reflection on the nature of world, and even the human particularities, cannot evade time problem. Aristotle is a stage under obligation in history of philosophy. My main purpose is to understand why time is problematic and what difficulties we have to meet with (chapter one). (...)
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  45. Change in Aristotle's Physics 3.Andreas Anagnostopoulos - 2010 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 39:33-79.
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  46. Aristotle on the Unity of Change: Five Reductio Arguments in Physics Viii 8.John Bowin - 2010 - Ancient Philosophy 30 (2):319-345.
  47. Contingency, Time and Possibility, an Essay on Aristotle and Duns Scotus.Pascal Massie - 2010 - Lexington Pbl..
    In Contingency, Time and Possibility, Pascal Massie explores the inquiries of Aristotle and Duns Scotus into contingency and possibility, as well as the complex and fascinating questions they raise.
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  48. The Structure of Praxis and the Time of Eudaimonia.David Webb - 2010 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 14 (2):265-287.
    The conception of time presented in Aristotle’s Physics IV has been supremely influential in the philosophical tradition. However, I shall argue that it proves to be inadequate to resolve a question arising from Aristotle’s own ethics; namely, the relation of ethical action to eudaimonia. As one explores this issue, a sense of time begins to emerge that calls for a reconsideration of the concepts of magnitude or dimension (megethos) and continuity (suneches) that determine the account of time found in Physics (...)
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  49. On Time as a Factor Differentiating Feeling and Thought. Aristotle – Fortenbaugh – Antiphon The Sophist – Weininger.Robert Zaborowski - 2010 - Organon 42:71–82.
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  50. Aristotle on the Order and Direction of Time.J. Bowin - 2009 - Apeiron: A Journal for Ancient Philosophy and Science 42 (1):33-62.
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