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Aristotle: Poetics
  1. CARÁTER, AÇÃO E DISCURSO NA POÉTICA DE ARISTÓTELES.Marco Valério Classe Colonnelli - 2020 - João Pessoa, Brazil: Editora UFPB.
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  2. Tapping the Wellsprings of Action: Aristotle's Birth of Tragedy as a Mimesis of Poetic Praxis.Katherine Kretler - 2018 - In Bruce M. King & Doherty Lillian (eds.), Thinking the Greeks: A Volume in Honour of James M. Redfield. London and New York: pp. 70-90.
    This essay offers an interpretation of Aristotle’s account of the birth of tragedy (Poetics 1448b18–1449a15) as a mimesis of poetic praxis. The workings of this passage emerge when read in connection with ring composition in Homeric speeches, and further unfold through a comparison with the Shield of Achilles and with an ode from Euripides’ Heracles. Aristotle appears to draw upon a traditional pattern enacting cyclical rebirth or revitalization. It is suggested that his puzzling insistence on “one complete action” in plot (...)
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  3. Love Song for the Life of the Mind: An Essay on the Purpose of Comedy.Gene Fendt - 2007 - Washington, DC, USA: Catholic University of America Press.
    Prefaced by an argument that the ancients understood mimesis as fundamental to being human, and art as therefore essential to human moral and intellectual development, this book starts from the problematic status of the (happily ending) Iphigenia in Poetics. How Aristotle must explicate tragedy to hold Iphigenia as the best thus sets up the exploration of comedy. Chapter two shows that comedy aims at the catharsis of desire and sympathy. This analysis is then applied in detail to Aristophanes’ Acharnians, Shakespeare’s (...)
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  4. Myths of Complexity.Claudia Westermann - 2011 - Design Ecologies 1 (2):267-284.
    The following article takes up a dialogue that was initiated in the first issue of Design Ecologies, evolving in relation to questions of design within a context of concepts of complexity. As the first part of the article shows, this process of taking up a dialogue – through reading and writing – can be considered a question of design. This is elaborated alongside de Certeau’s concepts of ‘tactics’ and ‘strategies’. Further, in relation to questions emerging from the previous issue of (...)
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  5. Aristotle on Dramatic Musical Composition. By Gregory Scott. [REVIEW]Gene Fendt - 2019 - Ancient Philosophy 39 (1):248-252.
    This is a review of Gregory Scott's book on Aristotle's Poetics, which he argues, with excellent and well-defended reasons, has the much narrow focus of dramatic musical art.
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  6. O Prazer das Mímeses Poéticas em Aristóteles.Vívian Val Monteiro - 2012 - Dissertation, UFBA, Brazil
  7. O Princípio Metafísico da Poética de Aristóteles.Aurélia Sotero Angelo - 2005 - Dissertation, UFRN, Brazil
  8. A Poética de Aristóteles: tradução e comentários.Fernando Maciel Gazoni - 2006 - Dissertation, USP, Brazil
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  9. Eudoro de Souza e a poética aristotélica.Claudia Pellegrini Drucker - 2010 - Peri 2 (1):81-97.
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  10. Mímesis e Tragédia na Poética de Aristóteles.Alexandre Mauro Toledo - 2005 - Dissertation, UFMG, Brazil
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  11. El método em Poética 1-6 de Aristóteles.Manuel Berrón - 2017 - Dissertatio 45:209-233.
    La premisa que guía nuestra investigación es que Poética es un tratado científico, i. e., que la investigación desarrollada en dicha obra se corresponde con el examen de una téchne. Defendemos que el método utilizado se corresponde con el método general de investigación denominado “salvar las apariencias”. Tal método es expuesto con más detalle en otras obras del corpus pero lo presuponemos utilizado en Poética. Si bien el método presupone la recolección de datos, no se limita a eso puesto que (...)
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  12. Howard Hawks and John Ford Resurgent.Raymond Aaron Younis - 1995 - Cinema Papers (1995).
    On the aesthetics and poetics of Hawks and Ford; their resurgence in film studies.
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  13. Alexandre Nicev, "L'énigme de la Catharsis Tragique Dans Aristote". [REVIEW]Wesley Trimpi - 1976 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 14 (1):101.
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  14. Michael David, "Aristotle's "Poetics": The Poetry of Philosophy". [REVIEW]Jacob Howland - 1994 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 32 (2):292.
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  15. "Plato and Aristotle on Poetry", by Gerald F. Else. [REVIEW]Elizabeth Belfiore - 1990 - Ancient Philosophy 10 (1):138.
  16. Arystotelesowskie Ujęcie Homonimii.Mikołaj Domaradzki - 2016 - Diametros 50:1-24.
    The purpose of the paper is to discuss Aristotle’s account of homonymy. The major thesis advocated here is that Aristotle considers both entities and words to be homonymous, depending on the object of his criticism. Thus, when he takes issue with Plato, he tends to view homonymy more ontologically, upon which it is entities that become homonymous. When, on the other hand, he gainsays the exegetes or the sophists, he is inclined to perceive homonymy more semantically, upon which it is (...)
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  17. Civic Laughter.John Lombardini - 2013 - Political Theory 41 (2):203-230.
    While the loss of the second book of the Poetics has deprived us of Aristotle’s most extensive account of laughter and comedy, his discussion of eutrapelia as a virtue in his ethical works and in the Rhetoric points toward the importance of humor for his ethical and political thought. This article offers a reconstruction of Aristotle’s account of wittiness and attempts to explain how the virtue of wittiness would animate the everyday interactions of ordinary citizens. Placing Aristotle’s account of wittiness (...)
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  18. Two Books on the Poetics. [REVIEW]C. Keith - 1932 - The Classical Review 46 (3):122-123.
  19. Aristotle for the Structuralist? R. Dupont-Roc, J. Lallot: Aristote: La Poétique, Texte, Traduction, Notes. (Collection Poétique.) Pp. 465. Paris: Editions du Seuil, 1980. Paper. [REVIEW]B. R. Rees - 1981 - The Classical Review 31 (2):178-179.
  20. Dignus Digno Vindice Nodus. [REVIEW]B. R. Rees - 1987 - The Classical Review 37 (2):201-203.
  21. The Poetics of Aristotle: Its Meaning and Influence. [REVIEW]S. K. Johnson - 1927 - The Classical Review 41 (2):86-87.
  22. Knoke on Aristotle's Conception of Tragedy. [REVIEW]H. Richards - 1907 - The Classical Review 21 (1):28-28.
  23. Greek Tragedy Reconsidered. [REVIEW]D. W. Lucas - 1963 - The Classical Review 13 (3):270-272.
  24. The Poetics for English Readers. [REVIEW]A. W. Pickard - 1940 - The Classical Review 54 (4):193-194.
  25. Studies of the Ars Poetica. [REVIEW]J. Tate - 1939 - The Classical Review 53 (5-6):191-192.
  26. Butcher's and Bywater' s Editions of the Poetics. [REVIEW]Herbert Richards - 1899 - The Classical Review 13 (1):47-49.
  27. Tucker's Poetics of Aristotle. [REVIEW]H. Richards - 1900 - The Classical Review 14 (4):224-225.
  28. The Poetics Translated. [REVIEW]A. W. Pickard-Cambridge - 1943 - The Classical Review 57 (2):76-76.
  29. The Poetics of Aristotle. [REVIEW]Herbert Richards - 1912 - The Classical Review 26 (3):87-91.
  30. Avicenna’s Commentary on the "Poetics" of Aristotle. [REVIEW]B. H. O. - 1975 - Review of Metaphysics 28 (4):750-750.
    The [[sic]] Arabic contribution to literary criticism is still very imperfectly known among Western scholars. It is important not only for the history of Arabic poetry, but for Latin Europe as well. Al-farabi’s discussion of poetry in his Catalog of the Sciences was translated into Latin by Gerard of Cremona and also incorporated into an important essay On the Division of Sciences by Dominicus Gundissalinus in the twelfth century. In 1256 Hermannus Almannus [[sic]] translated the Middle Commentary of Averroës on (...)
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  31. Ontology and the Art of Tragedy: An Approach to Aristotle’s Poetics, by Martha Husain. [REVIEW]Richard Bosley - 2006 - Ancient Philosophy 26 (2):427-430.
  32. On the Poetic Truth That is Higher Than History: Porphyry and the Philosophical Criticism of Literature.William Franke - 2010 - International Philosophical Quarterly 50 (4):415-430.
    Porphyry‘s “On the Cave of the Nymphs” inaugurates a style of philosophicoallegorical interpretation of literary texts that flourished in antiquity and finds analogues in criticism down to the present. It is distinguished by its use of literary interpretation to think through speculative problems of philosophy and theology. Although it became suspect in terms of Enlightenment philological principles prescribing interpretation of the text “on its own terms,” this kind of criticism reveals the originally philosophical motives and purpose of literary criticism and (...)
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  33. Greek Literary Criticism. [REVIEW]J. D. Denniston - 1927 - The Classical Review 41 (6):227-230.
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  34. The Poetics of Aristotle: Its Meaning and Influence. [REVIEW]John A. Oesterle - 1957 - New Scholasticism 31 (3):426-428.
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  35. Aristotle’s Philosophy of Art and the Beautiful.James Collins - 1942 - New Scholasticism 16 (3):257-284.
    In this article, aristotle firmly locates art as a practical-intellectual virtue of making. it governs our acts of providing forms from the mind, and for contingent materials that already have a natural form. whereas the useful arts compensate for the deficiencies of nature in meeting human needs, the imitative arts operate selectively to pervade the materials with significant, likely, and pleasing patterns. although he does not explicitly link art and beauty, aristotle does regard art as a splendid embodiment of order, (...)
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  36. Notes on Aristotle’s Concept of Improvisation.Andrew Haas - 2015 - Journal of Aesthetics and Phenomenology 2 (1):113-121.
    Improvisation is the origin of art and science, tragedy and comedy, acting and doing, of the self as improvising and improvised. But clearly we cannot use improvisation to explain improvisation. We cannot be satisfied with an argument that improvisation is, well, improvisational--nor simply free-play. Rather, improvisation as αὐτο-σχεδιάζεῖν, means self-schematization.
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  37. Virtues of Thought.Aryeh Kosman - 2014 - Harvard.
  38. CATARSE, EMOÇÃO E PRAZER NA POÉTICA DE ARISTÓTELES.Christiani Margareth de Menezes Silva - 2010 - Dissertation, Pontíficia Universidade Católica Do Rio de Janeiro
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  39. Between Ecstasy and Truth: Interpretations of Greek Poetics From Homer to Longinus.Stephen Halliwell - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
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  40. The Poets and the Philosophers: Genius and Analogy in Descartes and the Encyclopédie (Following Aristotle).Gregor Kroupa - 2015 - L'Esprit Créateur 55 (2):34-47.
    The article tackles the relationship between genius and analogy in Descartes’s early writings and the programmatic writings of the Encyclopédie. For Descartes, ingenious analogies between phenomena that are not obviously related belong more properly to poetic truth discourse, whereas philosophy must be content with the more easily observable and methodical mechanistic comparisons. In the encyclopedic ordering of Diderot and d’Alembert, on the other hand, ingenious analogies are not specific to any particular field of knowledge, since genius consists precisely in connecting (...)
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  41. A Cognitive Interpretation of Aristotle’s Concepts of Catharsis and Tragic Pleasure.Mahesh Ananth - 2014 - International Journal of Art and Art History 2 (2).
    Jonathan Lear argues that the established purgation, purification, and cognitive stimulation interpretations of Aristotle’s concepts of catharsis and tragic pleasure are off the mark. In response, Lear defends an anti-cognitivist account, arguing that it is the pleasure associated with imaginatively “living life to the full” and yet hazarding nothing of importance that captures Aristotle’s understanding of catharsis and tragic pleasure. This analysis reveals that Aristotle’s account of imagination in conjunction with his understanding of both specific intellectual virtues and rational emotions (...)
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  42. Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Aristotle and the Poetics.Angela Curran - 2015 - Routledge.
    Aristotle’s Poetics is the first philosophical account of an art form and is the foundational text in the history of aesthetics. The Routledge Philosophy Guidebook to Aristotle and the Poetics is an accessible guide to this often dense and cryptic work. Angela Curran introduces and assesses: Aristotle’s life and the background to the Poetics the ideas and text of the Poetics , including mimēsis ; poetic technē; the definition of tragedy; the elements of poetic composition; the Poetics’ recommendations for tragic (...)
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  43. Metáfora y analogía en Aristóteles. Su distinción y su uso en la ciencia.Daniel Vázquez - 2010 - Tópicos: Revista de Filosofía 38:85-116.
  44. Aristotle's Theory of Poetry and Fine Art, with a Critical Text and Translation of The Poetics. [REVIEW]C. C. V. - 1955 - Review of Metaphysics 9 (2):360-360.
    An exact reprint of the fourth edition of Butcher's famous commentary on the Poetics, together with his Greek text and English translation. Includes a helpful introductory essay, written especially for this edition, on "Aristotelian Literary Criticism".--V. C. C.
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  45. Aristotle's 'Poetics' and English Literature: A Collection of Critical Essays. Ed. Elder Olson.L. A. Waters - 1967 - Modern Schoolman 45 (1):63-64.
  46. Aristotle.Angela Curran - 2012 - In Alessandro Giovannelli (ed.), Aesthetics: The Key Thinkers. pp. 21-33.
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  47. Tragic Katharsis and Reparation: A Perspective on Aristotle's Poetics.E. Galgut - 2009 - South African Journal of Philosophy 28 (1):13-24.
    What Aristotle meant by katharsis has tantalised philosophers, psychologists, and literary critics alike for centuries - from metaphors of purgation, purification and ritual cleansing, to claims that katharsis is not an experience of the audience but a property of the play1, a release of feeling, or a kind of pleasure 2. Some authors, such as Daniels and Scully3, even deny that katharsis is essentially an aspect of the emotional experiences of an audience. This paper will provide an attempt at gaining (...)
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  48. Aristotle on the Philosophical Elements of Historia.Silvia Carli - 2011 - Review of Metaphysics 65 (2):321-349.
    This paper offers an interpretation and a defense of Aristotle’s view of history. According to a common reading of the Poetics, the philosopher intends to establish a dichotomy between history and poetry. On this view, the former speaks only of particulars because it relates events that are accidentally related to one another, whereas the latter speaks of universals because it organizes events according to causal relations of probability and necessity. A careful reading of the relevant passages of the Poetics and (...)
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