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  1. Aristotle's Meteorologica. [REVIEW]D. J. Furley - 1954 - The Classical Review 4 (2):117-119.
  2. Aristotle's De Generatione. [REVIEW]Edward S. Forster - 1944 - The Classical Review 58 (2):54-55.
  3. The Works of Aristotle. [REVIEW]F. H. A. Marshall - 1911 - The Classical Review 25 (7):208-209.
  4. Parva Naturalia by Aristotle. [REVIEW]Owsei Temkin - 1956 - Isis 47:70-71.
  5. Aristotle: On the Parts of Animals.James G. Lennox (ed.) - 2002 - Clarendon Press.
    Aristotle is without question the founder of the science of biology. In his treatise On the Parts of Animals, he develops his systematic principles for biological investigation, and explanation, and applies those principles to explain why the different animal kinds have the different parts that they do. It is one of the greatest achievements in the history of science. This new translation from the Greek aims to reflect the subtlety and detail of Aristotle's reasoning. The commentary provides help in understanding (...)
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  6. A Preliminary Study of Certain Mss. Of Aristotle's Meteorology.F. H. Fobes - 1913 - The Classical Review 27 (08):249-252.
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  7. Aristotle, de Anima Aristotle: De Anima. Edited with Introduction and Commentary by Sir David Ross. Pp. 338. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1961. Cloth, 50s. Net. [REVIEW]D. J. Furley - 1963 - The Classical Review 13 (01):46-49.
  8. Berger (F.) Die Textgeschichte der Historia Animalium des Aristoteles. (Serta Graeca: Beiträge zur Erforschung Griechischer Texte 21.) Pp. x + 242, figs, pls. Wiesbaden: Dr. Ludwig Reichert Verlag, 2005. Cased, €88. ISBN: 3-89500-439-. [REVIEW]Pieter Beullens - 2006 - The Classical Review 56 (02):306-.
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  9. The Parva Naturalia W. D. Ross: Aristotle, Parva Naturalia. A Revised Text with Introduction and Commentary. Pp. Xi+356. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1955. Cloth, 40s. Net. [REVIEW]D. J. Furley - 1956 - The Classical Review 6 (3-4):225-228.
  10. De Caelo.D. J. Allan (ed.) - 2005 - Clarendon Press.
    This new translation of _De Caelo_ fits seamlessly with other volumes in the New Hackett Aristotle series, enabling Anglophone readers to study Aristotle’s work in a way previously not possible. The Introduction describes the book that lies ahead, explaining what it is about, what it is trying to do, how it goes about doing it, and what sort of audience it presupposes. Sequentially numbered endnotes provide the information most needed at each juncture, while a detailed Index indicates the places where (...)
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  11. De Sensu and De Memoria. Aristotle - 1906 - New York: Arno Press.
    Originally published in 1906, this book presents the texts of Aristotle's De Sensu and De Memoria, the first two parts of the Parva Naturalia. Both are provided in Greek with a facing-page English translation. Detailed commentaries are also included, together with a bibliography and indexes in English and Greek. This book will be of value to anyone with an interest in Aristotle's works and classical philosophy.
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  12. On the Heavens. Aristotle & Harvard University - 1939 - Heinemann Harvard University Press.
    Aristotle, great Greek philosopher, researcher, reasoner, and writer, born at Stagirus in 384 BCE, was the son of Nicomachus, a physician, and Phaestis. He studied under Plato at Athens and taught there (367?347); subsequently he spent three years at the court of a former pupil, Hermeias, in Asia Minor and at this time married Pythias, one of Hermeias's relations. After some time at Mitylene, in 343?2 he was appointed by King Philip of Macedon to be tutor of his teen-aged son (...)
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  13. On the Motion of Animals. Aristotle - unknown
  14. On the Movements of Animals. Aristotle - unknown
  15. On Youth and Old Age, on Life and Death, on Breathing. Aristotle - unknown
  16. The History of Animals. Aristotle - unknown
  17. Aristotle on Memory and Recollection: Text, Translation, Interpretation, and Reception in Western Scholasticism.David Bloch - 2007 - Brill.
    Based on a new critical edition of Aristotle's "De Memoria" and two interpretive essays, this book challenges current views on Aristotle's theories of memory ...
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Aristotle: Physics
  1. Uma “exploração arqueológica” da ideia de vazio como recipiente a partir de Aristóteles, Physica 4.6 213a15-19.Gustavo Laet Gomes - 2021 - Journal of Ancient Philosophy 15 (2):77-103.
  2. Le divin, les dieux et le mouvement éternel dans l’univers d’Anaximandre.Luan Reboredo - 2021 - In Rossella Saetta Cottone (ed.), Penser les dieux avec les présocratiques. Paris: Rue D’Ulm. pp. 97-111.
    On propose ici de clarifier ce qu’Anaximandre entendait par « le divin » et ce qu’il appelait des « dieux ». À partir d’une réévaluation des sources anciennes, on soutient que cette enquête peut aider à comprendre son modèle cosmologique et le problème des cataclysmes dans son système. Trois hypothèses sont avancées à cette fin : [i] que dans Physique, III, 4, 203b3 15, le syntagme τὸ ἄπειρον renvoie à une notion concrète de substrat infini ; [ii] que dans ce (...)
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  3. Thought, Choice, and Other Causes in Aristotle’s Account of Luck.Emily Kress - 2021 - Apeiron 54 (4):615-648.
    In Physics 2.4–6, Aristotle offers an account of things that happen “by luck” and “spontaneously”. Many of these things are what we might think of as “lucky breaks”: cases where things go well for us, even though we don’t expect them to. In Physics 2.5, Aristotle illustrates this idea with the case of a man who goes to the market for some reason unrelated to collecting a debt he is owed. While he is there, this man just so happens to (...)
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  4. Physikvorlesung Teilband 1: Bücher I–IV.Gottfried Heinemann - forthcoming - Hamburg: Felix Meiner Verlag.
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  5. Aristotle's Physics VIII, Translated Into Arabic by Ishaq Ibn Hunayn (9th C.).Rüdiger Arnzen - 2020 - Berlin: Walter De Gruyter.
    Aristotle's theory of eternal continuous motion and his argument from everlasting change and motion to the existence of an unmoved primary cause of motion, provided in book VIII of his Physics, is one of the most influential and persistent doctrines of ancient Greek philosophy. Nevertheless, the exact wording of Aristotle's discourse is doubtful and contentious at many places. The present critical edition of Ishaq ibn Hunayn's Arabic translation (9th c.) is supposed to replace the faulty edition by A. Badawi and (...)
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  6. Aristoteles’ Theorie der Natur.Sonderegger Erwin - manuscript
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  7. Continuous Time and Instantaneous Speed in the Works of William Heytesbury and Richard Swineshead.Robert Podkoński - 2020 - Early Science and Medicine 25 (3):205-223.
    The term ‘instantaneous speed’ that appears explicitly in the works of famous Oxford fourteenth-century natural philosophers, William Heytesbury and Richard Swineshead, seems odd in the context of the then accepted Aristotelian worldview for at least two reasons. First, Aristotle himself stated unambiguously that no motion can occur in an instant. Second, after fourteenth-century atomism was rejected, the majority of thinkers denied the existence of instants, understood as indivisibles. Nevertheless, both Oxford philosophers describe instantaneous speed, also in the context of the (...)
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  8. Kritik Über Psellos & Benakis (2008): Kommentar Zur Physik des Aristoteles.Burkhard Mojsisch - 2008 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 13 (1):268-268.
  9. The Varieties of Necessity in Aristotle’s Physics II.9.Jacob Rosen - manuscript
  10. Physics V–VI Vs. VIII: : Unity of Change and Disunity in the Physics.Jacob Rosen - 2015 - In Mariska Leunissen (ed.), Aristotle’s Physics, a Critical Guide. Cambridge, UK: pp. 206–224.
    Aristotle offers several arguments in Physics viii.8 for his thesis that, when something moves back and forth, it does not undergo a single motion. These arguments occur against the background of a sophisticated theory, expounded in Physics v—vi, of the basic structure of motions and of other continuous entities such as times and magnitudes. The arguments in Physics viii.8 stand in a complex relation to that theory. On the one hand, Aristotle evidently relies on the theory in a number of (...)
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  11. A Fault Line in Aristotle’s Physics.Arnold Brooks - 2019 - Ancient Philosophy 39 (2):335-361.
    In Physics 4.11, Aristotle says that changes are continuous because magnitude is continuous. I suggest that this is not Aristotle’s considered view, and that in Generation and Corruption 2.10 Aristotle argues that this leads to the unacceptable consequence that alterations can occur discontinuously. Physics 6.4 was written to amend this theory, and to argue that changes are continuous because changing bodies are so. I also discuss the question of Aristotle’s consistency on the possibility of discontinuous alterations, such as freezing.
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  12. Air and Friction in the Celestial Region: Some Medieval Solutions to the Difficulties of the Aristotelian Theory Concerning the Production of Celestial Heat.Aurora Panzica - 2019 - Early Science and Medicine 24 (4):367-390.
    This paper explores the medieval debates concerning problems with the Aristotelian theory of the production and transmission of solar heat as presented in De Caelo II, 7 and Meteorologica I, 3. In these passages, Aristotle states that celestial heat is generated by the friction set up in the air by the motion of celestial bodies. This statement is difficult to reconcile with Aristotle’s cosmology, which presupposes that the heavenly bodies are not surrounded by air, but by aether, and that the (...)
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  13. Alma e movimento em Aristóteles.Francisco Moraes - 2019 - Anais de Filosofia Clássica 13 (25):21-42.
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  14. Sobre a tradução de enérgeia e entelékheia em Física III, 1-3.Luís Felipe Bellintani Ribeiro - 2019 - Anais de Filosofia Clássica 13 (25):57-69.
  15. The Middle Included - Logos in Aristotle.Omer Aygun - 2016 - Evanston, Illinois, Amerika Birleşik Devletleri: Northwestern University Press.
    The Middle Included is a systematic exploration of the meanings of logos throughout Aristotle’s work. It claims that the basic meaning is “gathering,” a relation that holds its terms together without isolating them or collapsing one to the other. This meaning also applies to logos in the sense of human language. Aristotle describes how some animals are capable of understanding non-firsthand experience without being able to relay it, while others relay it without understanding. Aygün argues that what distinguishes human language, (...)
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  16. The Unity of the Concept of Matter in Aristotle.Ryan Miller - 2018 - Dissertation, The Catholic University of America
    The difficulties often attributed to prime matter hold for all hylomorphic accounts of substantial change. If the substratum of substantial change actually persists through the change, then such change is merely another kind of accidental change. If the substratum does not persist, then substantial change is merely creation ex nihilo. Either way matter is an empty concept, explaining nothing. This conclusion follows from Aristotle’s homoeomerity principle, and attempts to evade this conclusion by relaxing the constraints Aristotle imposes on elementhood, generation, (...)
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  17. How Things Happen for the Sake of Something: The Dialectical Strategy of Aristotle, Physics 2.8.Emily Nancy Kress - 2019 - Phronesis 64 (3):321-347.
    I offer a fresh interpretation of the dialectical strategy of Physics 2.8’s arguments that things in nature happen for the sake of something. Whereas many recent interpreters have concluded that these arguments inevitably beg the question against Aristotle’s opponents, I argue that they constitute a careful attempt to build common ground with an opponent who rejects Aristotle’s basic worldview. This common ground, first articulated in the famous Winter Rain Argument, takes the form of an intriguing pattern of reasoning: that natural (...)
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  18. Aristotle on Kosmos and Kosmoi.Monte Johnson - 2019 - In Phillip Horky (ed.), Cosmos in the Ancient World. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. pp. 74-107.
    The concept of kosmos did not play the leading role in Aristotle’s physics that it did in Pythagorean, Atomistic, Platonic, or Stoic physics. Although Aristotle greatly influenced the history of cosmology, he does not himself recognize a science of cosmology, a science taking the kosmos itself as the object of study with its own phenomena to be explained and its own principles that explain them. The term kosmos played an important role in two aspects of his predecessor’s accounts that Aristotle (...)
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  19. Aristotle, Physics Iii and Iv - Edward Hussey: Aristotle's Physics, Books III and IV. Translated with Notes. Pp. Xlix + 226. Oxford University Press, 1983. £13.50. [REVIEW]Lindsay Judson - 1985 - The Classical Review 35 (1):74-77.
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  20. O Espaço em Aristóteles: da bidimensionalidade do topos às seis diastaseis que definem os animais.Francisco Caruso - forthcoming - Anais de Filosofia Clássica.
    Within the general discussion of space and its dimensionality, Aristotle's position is of the greatest relevance, as one will have the opportunity to argue and discuss in this article.
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  21. Aristotle’s Theory of Language in the Light of Phys. I.1.Pavol Labuda - 2018 - Aither. Journal for the Study of Greek and Latin Philosophical Traditions 10 (20/2018 - International Issue 5):66-77.
    The main aim of my paper is to analyse Aristotle’s theory of language in the context of his Physics I.1 and via an analysis and an interpretation of this part of his Physics I try to show that (i) the study of human language (logos) significantly falls within the competence of Aristotle’s physics (i.e. natural philosophy), (ii) we can find the results of such (physical) inquiry in Aristotle’s zoological writings, stated in the forms of the first principles, causes and elements (...)
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  22. Aristotle’s Physics 5.1, 225a1-B5.John Bowin - 2019 - Philosophical Inquiry 43:147-164.
    This contribution offers an interpretation of the last half of chapter 1 of book 5 of Aristotle’s Physics in the form of a commentary. Among other things, it attempts an explanation of why Aristotle calls the termini of changes ‘something underlying’ (ὑποκείμενον) and ‘something not underlying’ (μὴ ὑποκείμενον). It also provides an analysis of Aristotle’s argument for the claim that what is not simpliciter does not change in the light of this interpretation.
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  23. Aristotle as A-Theorist: Overcoming the Myth of Passage.Jacqueline Mariña & Franklin Mason - 2001 - Journal of History of Philosophy 39:169-192.
    Two things are often said about Aristotle's treatment of time in the Physics. First, that Aristotle's considered view of time is intrinsically tied to a language of temporal passage heavily dependent on the A-series. As such Aristotle's understanding of time is plagued with the perplexities that the A-series generates. Second, that the series of puzzles that Aristotle treats in IV.10, leading to the conclusion that time is non-existent, are left unanswered by Aristotle. Instead after presenting the puzzles having to do (...)
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  24. The Problem of Substantial Generation in Aristotle's Physical Writings.Michael Ivins - 2008 - Dissertation, Duquesne University
  25. The Now and the Relation Between Motion and Time in Aristotle: A Systematic Reconstruction.Mark Sentesy - 2018 - Apeiron 51 (3):279-323.
    This paper reconstructs the relationship between the now, motion, and number in Aristotle to clarify the nature of the now, and, thereby, the relationship between motion and time. Although it is clear that for Aristotle motion, and, more generally, change, are prior to time, the nature of this priority is not clear. But if time is the number of motion, then the priority of motion can be grasped by examining his theory of number. This paper aims to show that, just (...)
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  26. Change, Agency and the Incomplete in Aristotle.Andreas Anagnostopoulos - 2017 - Phronesis 62 (2):170-209.
    Aristotle’s most fundamental distinction between changes and other activities is not that ofMetaphysicsΘ.6, between end-exclusive and end-inclusive activities, but one implicit inPhysics3.1’s definition of change, between the activity of something incomplete and the activity of something complete. Notably, only the latter distinction can account for Aristotle’s view, inPhysics3.3, that ‘agency’—effecting change in something, e.g. teaching—does not qualify strictly as a change. This distinction informsDe Anima2.5 and imparts unity to Aristotle’s extended treatment of change inPhysics3.1-3.
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  27. Jean De Groot. Aristotle’s Empiricism: Experience and Mechanics in the Fourth Century BC. Las Vegas, NV: Parmenides, 2014. Pp. Xxv+442. $127.00. [REVIEW]Richard DeWitt - 2017 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 7 (1):176-179.
  28. Being Itself and the Being of Beings: Reading Aristotle's Critique of Parmenides (Physics 1.3) After Metaphysics.Jussi Backman - 2018 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (2):271-291.
    The essay studies Aristotle’s critique of Parmenides in the light of the Heideggerian account of Platonic-Aristotelian metaphysics as an approach to being in terms of beings. Aristotle’s critique focuses on the presuppositions of the Parmenidean thesis of the unity of being. It is argued that a close study of the presuppositions of Aristotle’s own critique reveals an important difference between the Aristotelian metaphysical framework and the Parmenidean “protometaphysical” approach. The Parmenides fragments indicate being as such in the sense of the (...)
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  29. Are Potency and Actuality Compatible in Aristotle?Mark Sentesy - 2018 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy:239-270.
    The belief that Aristotle opposes potency (dunamis) to actuality (energeia or entelecheia) has gone untested. This essay defines and distinguishes forms of the Opposition Hypothesis—the Actualization, Privation, and Modal—examining the texts and arguments adduced to support them. Using Aristotle’s own account of opposition, the texts appear instead to show that potency and actuality are compatible, while arguments for their opposition produce intractable problems. Notably, Aristotle’s refutation of the Megarian Identity Hypothesis applies with equal or greater force to the Opposition Hypothesis. (...)
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  30. Chelsea C. Harry. Chronos in Aristotle’s Physics: On the Nature of Time. Dordrecht: Springer, 2015. Pp. Xiii+75. $39.99. [REVIEW]Andrea Falcon - 2017 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 7 (2):395-397.
  31. The Hermeneutic Problem of Potency and Activity in Aristotle.Mark Sentesy - 2017 - In The Challenge of Aristotle. Sofia, Bulgaria: Sofia University Press.
    Of Aristotle’s core terms, potency (dunamis) and actuality (energeia) are among the most important. But when we attempt to understand what they mean, we face the following problem: their primary meaning is movement, as a source (dunamis) or as movement itself (energeia). We therefore have to understand movement in order to understand them. But the structure of movement is itself articulated using these terms: it is the activity of a potential being, as potent. This paper examines this hermeneutic circle, and (...)
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  32. Aristotle's Measuring Dilemma.Barbara Sattler - 2017 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 52:257-301.
    This paper has two main goals: first, it reconstructs Aristotle’s account of measurement in his Metaphysics and shows how it connects to modern notions of measurement. Second, it demonstrates that Aristotle’s notion of measurement only works for simple measures, but leads him into a dilemma once it comes to measuring complex phenomena, like mo-tion, where two or more different aspects, such as time and space, have to be taken into account. This is shown with the help of Aristotle’s reaction to (...)
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  33. Alexander Against Galen on Motion: A Mere Logical Debate?Orna Harari - 2016 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 50:291-236.
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