Art and Artworks

Edited by Nicholas Riggle (University of San Diego)
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  1. The Rhetorical Hero. An Essay on the Aesthetics of André Malraux. By William Righter. (Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1964. Pp. Ix and 92.). [REVIEW]Cyril Barrett - 1966 - Philosophy 41 (156):185-.
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  2. Encounters with an Art-Thing.Jane Bennett - 2015 - Evental Aesthetics 4 (1):71-87.
    FEATURED IN EVENTAL AESTHETICS RETROSPECTIVE 1. LOOKING BACK AT 10 ISSUES OF EVENTAL AESTHETICS. What kind of things are damaged art-objects? Are they junk, trash, mere stuff? Or do they remain art by virtue of their distinguished provenance or still discernible design? What kind of powers do such things have as material bodies and forces? Instead of attempting to locate proper concepts for salvaged art-things, this essay, from a perspective centered on the power of bodies-in-encounter – where “power” in Spinoza’s (...)
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  3. André Malraux's Man's Fate.Harold Bloom (ed.) - 1988 - Chelsea House.
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  4. What Does It Mean to Know Art? : An Institutional Account.Ted Bracey - 2001 - In Paul Duncum & Ted Bracey (eds.), On Knowing: Art and Visual Culture. Canterbury University Press.
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  5. CPHL504 Philosophy of Art I Photocopy Packet (Edited by V.I. Burke).Victoria I. Burke (ed.) - 2014 - Toronto, anada: Ryerson University.
    This collection of writings on aesthetics includes selections from Theodor Adorno, Walter Benjamin, Mikhail Bakhtin, Sigmund Freud, Martin Heidegger, Amy Mullin, Friedrich Nietzsche, and Frederich Wilhelm Joseph von Schelling. This collection may still be available as a print-on-demand title at the Ryerson University bookstore.
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  6. PHIL4230 Photocopy Packet Surrealism (Edited by V.I. Burke).Victoria I. Burke (ed.) - 2011 - Guelph: University of Guelph.
    This out-of-print, two-volume, photocopy packet, in the area of "Surrealism and the Politics of the Particular" includes readings on language, meaning, and surrealism from Adorno, Benjamin, McCumber, Breton, Heidegger, Freud, Kristeva, Ricouer, and Bataille.
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  7. Ugo Nespolo: a proposito di rappresentazioni.Elisa Caldarola - 2015 - Rivista di Estetica 58.
    An analysis of three pictorial works by Ugo Nespolo is put forward: "Barbe posticce" (1977); "Guardar Manzoni" (1974); "Il museo: Fontana" (1975). It is claimed that such works embody meditations on the concept and the varieties of representation, that they prompt critical reflections on the role of museums in art-making, and that they suggest an alternative route to that of the 'dematerialization' of the art object for the understanding of contemporary art.
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  8. The Authorship of the Recueil D'Arras.Lorne Campbell - 1977 - Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 40:301-313.
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  9. Umberto Eco, Art and Beauty in the Middle Ages. [REVIEW]Mark Cheetham - 1987 - Philosophy in Review 7:229-230.
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  10. Can Machines Create Art?Mark Coeckelbergh - 2017 - Philosophy and Technology 30 (3):285-303.
    As machines take over more tasks previously done by humans, artistic creation is also considered as a candidate to be automated. But, can machines create art? This paper offers a conceptual framework for a philosophical discussion of this question regarding the status of machine art and machine creativity. It breaks the main question down in three sub-questions, and then analyses each question in order to arrive at more precise problems with regard to machine art and machine creativity: What is art (...)
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  11. Can Machines Create Art?Mark Coeckelbergh - 2016 - Philosophy and Technology:1-19.
    As machines take over more tasks previously done by humans, artistic creation is also considered as a candidate to be automated. But, can machines create art? This paper offers a conceptual framework for a philosophical discussion of this question regarding the status of machine art and machine creativity. It breaks the main question down in three sub-questions, and then analyses each question in order to arrive at more precise problems with regard to machine art and machine creativity: What is art (...)
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  12. In Search of the Ontological Common Core of Artworks: Radical Embodiment and Non-Universalization.Gianluca Consoli - 2016 - Estetika 53 (1):14-41.
    I propose that artworks represent a specific and homogeneous ontological kind, grounded in a common ontological core. I call this common core ‘non-universalizable embodied meaning’, and I argue that this common core explains how artworks unfold their ontological identity at the physical, intentional, and social levels on the basis of an original and irreducible mode of material embodiment and cultural emergence; this common core functions as the constitutive rule of art and institutes an axiological normativity, that is, normativity based on (...)
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  13. Artworld Metaphysics.B. Cooke - 2008 - British Journal of Aesthetics 48 (4):469-471.
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  14. Mag Uidhir on What Is “Minimally Viable” in “Art-Theoretic Space”.David Davies - 2018 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 52 (2):8.
    One of the most striking features of Christy Mag Uidhir’s rich and challenging book is the contrast between the modesty of its professed aim and the controversial nature of its professed conclusions. The aim is to investigate “what follows from taking intention-dependence seriously as a substantive necessary condition for being art.”1 The concern is not to give a theory of art but to clarify “the nature of the art-theoretic space that any art theory must occupy so as to be minimally (...)
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  15. Descriptivism and Its Discontents.David Davies - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 75 (2):117-129.
    Is ontologizing about art rightly held accountable to artistic practice, and, if so, how? Julian Dodd argues against such accountability. His target is “local descriptivism,” a meta-ontological principle that he contrasts with meta-ontological realism. The local descriptivist thinks that folk-theoretic beliefs implicit in our practices somehow determine the ontological characters of artworks. I argue, however, that according a grounding role to artistic practice in the ontology of art does not conflict with meta-ontological realism. Practice must ground our ontological inquiries because (...)
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  16. The Cluster Theory of Art.S. Davies & J. Robinson - 2004 - British Journal of Aesthetics 44 (3):297-300.
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  17. Life is a Passacaglia.Stephen Davies - 2009 - Philosophy and Literature 33 (2):315-328.
    Arthur C. Danto taught that an artwork’s identity and content depend on "an atmosphere of theory the eye cannot de[s]cry" (1964:580). By "theory", he did not mean the ideas developed by philosophers of art. His point was that an artwork can be properly recognized and appreciated only when seen in relation to the heritage of works, writings, practices, genres, and conventions that form the ground on which it stands out as subject. In brief, the work must be seen against the (...)
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  18. Definitions of Art.Stephen Davies - 1991 - Cornell University Press.
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  19. Functional and Procedural Definitions of Art.Stephen Davies - 1990 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 24 (2):99.
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  20. The Aesthetic Creation Theory of Art.Rafael De Clercq - 2009 - Sztuka I Filozofia (Art and Philosophy) 35:20-24.
    This is a critical discussion of Nick Zangwill’s Aesthetic Creation Theory of Art, as he has presented the theory in his book Aesthetic Creation. The discussion focuses on two questions: first, whether the notion of art implied by Zangwill’s theory is at once too wide and too narrow; second, whether Zangwill is right about the persistence conditions of works of art.
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  21. The Aesthetic and Cognitive Value of Surprise.Alexandre Declos - 2014 - Proceedings of the European Society for Aesthetics 6:52-69.
    It is a common experience to be surprised by an artwork. In this paper, I examine how and why this obvious fact matters for philosophical aesthetics. Following recent works in psychology and philosophers such as Davidson or Scheffler, we will see that surprise qualifies as an emotion of a special kind, essentially “cognitive” or “epistemic” in its nature and functioning. After some preliminary considerations, I wish to hold two general claims: the first one will be that surprise is somehow related (...)
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  22. Malraux Et la Condition Revolutionnaire.Jean-Hervé Donnard - 1979 - In Paul Hallberg (ed.), The Condition of Man: Proceedings of an International Symposium Held September 8-10, 1978 in Göteborg to Celebrate the 200th Anniversary of the Royal Society of Arts and Sciences of Göteborg. Vetenskaps- O. Vitterhets-Samhället. pp. 107.
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  23. Seeable Signs: The Iconography of the Seven Sacraments 1350-1544 by Ann Eljenholm Nichols.Regis A. Duffy - 1998 - Franciscan Studies 55 (1):362-366.
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  24. The Art to End All Arts.Claes Entzenberg - 2013 - Nordic Journal of Aesthetics 23 (46).
    The death of art has been a notion used in connection with the development and progress of art. This view of the development of art, the movement from one position to another, can go on forever. From another view, we see art as part of a narration, which makes the death of art absolute and final, even though art is still produced. In our time, the American philosopher A. C. Danto uses Hegel’s developmental view on history to explain pictorial Western (...)
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  25. The Chances of a Dialogue Berenson and Malraux.R. Ergmann - 1954 - Diogenes 2 (7):68-89.
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  26. Perceiving Artworks.John Fisher - 1981 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 39 (3):315-316.
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  27. The Technological Value Cluster (Value Cluster IV).William C. Frederick - 1995 - The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:200-204.
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  28. Andre Malraux and the Tragic Imagination.W. M. Frohock - 1954 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 13 (1):116-116.
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  29. Decadence & Aesthetics.Sacha Golob - forthcoming - In Desmarais & Weir (eds.), Decadence. Cambridge University Press.
    he relationship between decadence and aesthetics is an intimate and complex one. Both the stock figure of the aesthete and the aestheticism of ‘art for art’s sake’ are classic decadent tropes with obvious sources in figures such as Théophile Gautier, Walter Pater, Joris-Karl Huysmans. Yet the links between aesthetics and decadence are more conflicted than might first appear: historically, aesthetics has served both as a site for the theorisation of decadence and as the basis of an attempt to stem it. (...)
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  30. Ambivalent Agency: A Response to Trogdon and Livingston on Artwork Completion.K. E. Gover - 2015 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 73 (4):457-460.
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  31. Aesthetic Empiricism and the Challenge of Fakes and Ready-Mades.Gordon Graham - 2006 - In Matthew Kieran (ed.), Contemporary Debates in Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art. Blackwell. pp. 11--21.
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  32. Transgressive Traditions and Art Definitions.Leslie Graves - 1998 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 56 (1):39-48.
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  33. Nicholas of Lyra and Michelangelo’s Ancestors of Christ.Harry B. Gutman - 1944 - Franciscan Studies 4 (3):223-228.
  34. Between and After Essentialism and Institutionalism.Peter Gyorgy - 1999 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 57 (4):421-437.
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  35. Art Rethought: The Social Practices of Art.Garry L. Hagberg - 2017 - British Journal of Aesthetics 57 (3):331-334.
    © British Society of Aesthetics 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society of Aesthetics. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.comThere exists, according to Nicholas Wolterstorff in this deeply engaging and exemplary study, a Grand Narrative that runs through much of our thinking about art. That narrative, emerging from and solidified since the eighteenth century, is in essence that art is created for, and remains in museums and galleries as occasions for, abstract and transcendent (...)
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  36. Word and Object: Museums and the Matter of Meaning.Garry L. Hagberg - 2016 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 79:261-293.
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  37. Berenson Et Andre Malraux.Bernard Halda - 1965 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 23 (4):514-515.
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  38. Art Rethought: The Social Practices of Art By Nicholas Wolterstorff.Andy Hamilton - 2018 - Analysis 78 (1):186-188.
    © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Analysis Trust. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.comIn this very wide-ranging and absorbing monograph, Nicholas Wolterstorff argues that modern aestheticians ignore the varieties of engagement with art, in an exclusive focus on disinterested attention. This, he argues, is because they assume the ‘grand narrative concerning art in the modern world’. According to Wolterstorff, this narrative holds that in the Early Modern period in the West, members (...)
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  39. Introduction to Philosophy and Museums: Essays in the Philosophy of Museums.Victoria S. Harrison, Anna Bergqvist & Gary Kemp - 2016 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 79:1-12.
    Museums and their practices—especially those involving collection, curation and exhibition—generate a host of philosophical questions. Such questions are not limited to the domains of ethics and aesthetics, but go further into the domains of metaphysics, epistemology and philosophy of religion. Despite the prominence of museums as public institutions, they have until recently received surprisingly little scrutiny from philosophers in the Anglo-American tradition. By bringing together contributions from philosophers with backgrounds in a range of traditional areas of philosophy, this volume demonstrates (...)
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  40. Botticelli's Mystic Nativity, Savonarola and the Millennium.Rab Hatfield - 1995 - Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 58:89-114.
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  41. An Enquiry Into Passive Inclusion and Unreachable Artworks at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York: Three Case Studies of Verbal Imaging Teachers Describing Artworks in Galleries and Classrooms.Simon Hayhoe - unknown
    Three case studies of teachers at the Metropolitan Museum of Art are discussed in the context of a larger grounded theory parent study of blind and visually impaired visitors, teachers and systems of instruction. The fieldwork focused on verbal imaging techniques to describe unreachable artworks. The analysis focuses on the traditional understanding that artworks in the museum are deciphered primarily from the perspective of visual perception, that museums are simple vessels of art, as contended by Ernst Gombrich and Pierre Bourdieu, (...)
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  42. The Participatory Art Museum: Approached From a Philosophical Perspective.Sarah Hegenbart - 2016 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 79:319-339.
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  43. Energeia and "The Work Itself".Michael Hicks - 1987 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 21 (3):69-75.
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  44. "How Does This Artwork Make You Feel?" A "No-No" Question in Art Museum Education? Hubard - 2015 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 49 (2):82.
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  45. Strange Tools: Art and Human Nature, by Alva Nöe.John Hyman - 2017 - Mind 126 (501):304-309.
    Strange Tools: Art and Human Nature, by NöeAlva. New York: Hill and Wang, 2015. Pp. xiii + 285.
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  46. Introduction to the Symposium on Christy Mag Uidhir's Art and Art-Attempts.Sherri Irvin - 2018 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 52 (2):1.
    Christy Mag Uidhir’s Art and Art-Attempts begins from two deceptively simple observations: artworks are the product of intentions, and intentions are the kinds of things that can fail to be realized successfully.1 Drawing on these observations, he argues that most contemporary theories of art must be rejected because they are not substantively intention-dependent: that is, they do not account for the fact that an attempt to make an artwork can fail.From his view that artworks must be the product of art-attempts (...)
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  47. Repeatable Artworks and the Relevant Similarity Relation.Sherri Irvin - 2018 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 52 (2):30.
    In Art and Art-Attempts, Christy Mag Uidhir argues that an artwork must be the product of an art-attempt that could, in principle, have failed.1 Because being the product of an attempt is a causal-intentional notion, artworks must be able to stand in causal relations. As many have observed, abstract objects, standardly construed, cannot stand in causal relations. Therefore, Mag Uidhir says, artworks, whether repeatable or not, cannot be abstract objects.Theorists including Sally Haslanger, Barry Smith, and Amie Thomasson have argued that (...)
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  48. Authenticity.Anna Karlström - 2015 - In Kathryn Lafrenz Samuels & Trinidad Rico (eds.), Heritage Keywords. University Press of Colorado.
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  49. Authenticity.Anna Karlström - 2015 - In Kathryn Lafrenz Samuels & Trinidad Rico (eds.), Heritage Keywords. University Press of Colorado..
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  50. Reflections on the Ethics and Aesthetics of Restoration and Conservation.Peter Lamarque - 2016 - British Journal of Aesthetics 56 (3):281-299.
    This paper looks at some of the principles behind restoration and conservation applied to ancient artefacts and architecture. A number of case studies are discussed, from medieval stained glass to buildings that have been damaged by fire. The paper ends with some remarks about the conservation of ruins. Underlying the discussion are questions about the kinds of obligations—both ethical and aesthetic—that might constrain the practices of restoration: what ought and ought not to be done in particular cases and how such (...)
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