Asian Philosophy

Edited by JeeLoo Liu (California State University, Fullerton)
94 found
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1 — 50 / 94
  1. added 2017-07-22
    Only Music Cannot Be Faked.Meilin Chinn - forthcoming - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy:1-14.
    Among the various claims by early Chinese philosophers to hear someone’s de 德 or virtue through their music, the most astonishing statement may be found in the Yue Ji 樂記 : “Only Music cannot be faked”. While this classic Ru 儒 musical treatise on the development of human excellence in accordance with music is wide-ranging, the aim of this essay is narrow, in that it seeks to interpret this single sentence of the text by way of an explanation of the (...)
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  2. added 2017-07-20
    Sound and Notation: Comparative Study on Musical Ontology.So Jeong Park - forthcoming - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy:1-14.
    Music is said to consist of melody, rhythm, and harmony. Sound is assumed to be something that automatically follows once musical structure is determined. Sound, which is what actually impinges on our eardrums, has been so long forgotten in the history of musical theory. It is ironic that we do not talk about the music which we hear every day but rather are exclusively concerned about the abstracted structure behind it. This is a legacy of ancient Greek ideas about music, (...)
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  3. added 2017-07-20
    Metaphor, Blending, and Cultural Variation: A Reply to Camus.Edward Slingerland - forthcoming - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy:1-5.
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  4. added 2017-07-20
    A Comparative Study of the Subject in Jacques Lacan and Zhuangzi.Quan Wang - 2017 - Asian Philosophy 27 (3):248-262.
    Jacques Lacan has creatively grafted Zhuangzi’s concept of the subject on the Western tradition of Logo-centrism. Lacan rewrites the triangle positions of the subject as the Real, the Imaginary, the Symbolic, expresses them in the vocabulary of detective stories, and achieves his scholarly reputation. The insufficiency of his theory could be redressed by Zhuangzi’s idea of ‘the poetics of oneness.’ For Zhuangzi, a man can forget his ‘Social I’ and ‘Corporeal I,’ arrive at the phase of ‘the equality of things’ (...)
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  5. added 2017-07-18
    Nagarjuna’s No-Thesis View Revisited: The Significance of Classical Indian Debate Culture on Verse 29 of the Vigrahavyāvartanī.D. Williams-Wyant Matthew - 2017 - Asian Philosophy 27 (3):263-277.
    The aim of this essay is to clarify Nāgārjuna’s use of the term pratijñā in verse 29 of the Vigrahavyāvartanī as situated in its contemporaneous thriving debate culture. In contrast to the standard formulation, which interprets the term pratijñā as a reference to the thesis of śūnyatā proffered by Nāgārjuna in the Mūlamadhyamakakārikā, an examination of the debate culture in, and leading up to, second-century CE India shows that the term pratijñā refers to the first of five steps within the (...)
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  6. added 2017-07-18
    Li, Qing, and Ethical Transformation in the Xunzi.Sung Winnie - 2017 - Asian Philosophy 27 (3):227-247.
    This paper analyses the connection between knowing Dao and ethical transformation in Xunzi’s thought. While there have been many discussions concerning what Dao is and how one may come to Dao, there has not been sufficient attention on how knowing Dao leads to ethical transformation. In Section 2, I explicate Xunzi’s concept of bi 蔽 and suggests that one’s not knowing Dao has to do with a certain problematic state of the heart/mind. In Section 3, I analyse xu虛, yi 一, (...)
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  7. added 2017-07-18
    “A Discussion of Alex Watson’s The Self's Awareness of Itself. With an Addendum About the Transmission of Dharmakīrti’s Pramāṇaviniścaya”.Cristina Pecchia - 2014 - Rivista Degli Studi Orientali 87:107-119.
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  8. added 2017-07-14
    Hutton, Eric L., Ed., Dao Companion to the Philosophy of Xunzi. [REVIEW]Winnie Sung - forthcoming - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy:1-5.
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  9. added 2017-07-13
    Relational Self in Classical Confucianism: Lessons From Confucius' Analects.O. Thompson Kirill - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (3):887-907.
    One’s translating, reading, and understanding of texts from other eras and traditions are conditioned by tacit assumptions built into one’s own vocabulary and psycho-cultural understanding of self—of which one tends to be only intuitively aware. Thus, for example, when encountering the vocabulary in Classical Chinese for “I,” “me,” “mine,” “self,” et cetera, modern readers are inclined to import their own linguistic, cognitive, and cultural intuitions about these terms, unconsciously and without second thought. This has been particularly problematic for modern Western (...)
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  10. added 2017-07-13
    Al-Ghazālī's Moderation in Belief: Al-Iqtiṣād Fī Al-I'tiqād Tran. By Aladdin M. Yaqub.Recep Alpyağil - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (3):933-934.
    It is quite common to refer to al-Ghazālī as one of the most important thinkers in the Islamic intellectual tradition. Aladdin M. Yaqub’s Al-Ghazālī’s Moderation in Belief: al-Iqtiṣād fī al-i’tiqād shows that this remark is not hyperbolic. And this volume has many characteristics of a good translation of classical texts. First of all, Aladdin M. Yaqub is very consistent with his use of terminology. He explains his preferences for Arabic philosophical terms in “Note on the Translation”. As is well known, (...)
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  11. added 2017-07-13
    Classical Confucian Political Thought: A New Interpretation, by Loubna El Amine.Elstein David - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (3):917-919.
    Confucian political philosophy is enjoying a renaissance. In the last two decades a number of significant monographs in English have appeared, to say nothing of the Chinese studies that are virtually beyond count. If they have a common theme, it is that Confucian politics is an extension of its ethical thought. Confucian politics is not a mere application of techniques for producing order, as in Legalism, nor does it separate politics and personal morality, as in liberalism. Considering a wide array (...)
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  12. added 2017-07-13
    The Philosophy of Living by François Jullien, And: This Strange Idea of the Beautiful by François Jullien.Oliver Leaman - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (3):940-942.
    It is appropriate to deal with The Philosophy of Living and This Strange Idea of the Beautiful together since they both embody the methodology of François Jullien that is to be found in many of his books. The European Continental tradition in philosophy on a particular topic is outlined and then contrasted unfavorably with Chinese philosophy on the same topic, although it has to be said immediately that by “Chinese philosophy” the author means those parts of it that he selects. (...)
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  13. added 2017-07-13
    One and the Possibility of Many in Greek and Indian Philosophy: Plotinus and Rāmānuja.Daniel Regnier - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (3):825-840.
    Philosophers often devote their most painstaking work to distinguishing their own thought from that of philosophers with whom they, in fact, share a great affinity. One of the foremost challenges to Platonic thought has been to qualify its assertion that the One, although beyond being, is the ultimate principle of reality. For to assert the primacy of the One in certain philosophical contexts might seem to exclude the reality of multiplicity. Yet Platonic thought does not hold that multiplicity is simply (...)
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  14. added 2017-07-13
    The Strong Case for Vegetarianism in Pātañjala Yoga.Jonathan Dickstein - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (3):613-628.
    In a recent interview, yoga historian David Gordon White commented on the precarious commitment that modern yoga has to so-called Classical Yoga. The predicament stems from a disjuncture between the contents of the Yogasūtra and the practices and concepts commonly taught in many yoga centers and trainings. The latter teachings resonate stronger with alternative traditions, specifically those illustrated in haṭha yoga and Vedānta sources and within their related living communities.1 As White concluded regarding this peculiar and ubiquitous selection of the (...)
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  15. added 2017-07-13
    Hundun's Mistake: Satire and Sanity in the Zhuangzi.Hans-Georg Moeller - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (3):783-800.
    The narrative of the Death of Emperor Hundun 混沌, who finally perishes from the seventh hole that his two fellow Emperors have drilled into his formless body to do him the favor of supplying him with a face, famously concludes the seven Inner Chapters of the Zhuangzi 莊子.1 Perhaps the sudden demise of the story’s protagonist is meant to signal paradoxically to the reader that he or she, too, has, unwittingly, now come to an end and reached a stage of (...)
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  16. added 2017-07-13
    Polyvalent Philosophy and Soteriology in Early Buddhism.Eviatar Shulman - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (3):864-886.
    The ideas of a “Buddha” or of his “enlightenment” suggest a certain unity and coherence. In accord with the positivist and metaphysical realist attitudes of our times, many assume that a Buddha is defined by his awakening, which is conceived of as a definitive, clear-cut event with specific characteristics. Enlightenment is a “thing,” a recognizable state of mind or change of consciousness, or perhaps a similar kind of process, which may be beyond the grasp of words, but is nevertheless confidently (...)
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  17. added 2017-07-13
    Philosophy: The Next Step.Anand Jayprakash Vaidya - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (3):922-932.
    Comparative Philosophy without Borders, edited by Arindam Chakrabarti and Ralph Weber is an outstanding and groundbreaking anthology that is also a prolegomena to all future philosophy, not just comparative philosophy. The anthology sets forward an agenda that is arguably the next step for philosophy. Chakrabarti and Weber have a dream : Our dream is that future fusion philosophy will shed its local epithets, even the epithet “comparative.” All good philosophy should be unapologetically, and, eventually, unself-consciously, comparative and culturally hybrid....
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  18. added 2017-07-13
    Ethics and Politics in Classical Confucian Thought: A Response to David Elstein.Amine Loubna El - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (3):919-920.
    In his review of my book, Classical Confucian Political Thought, David Elstein argues that my interpretation of Classical Confucian political thought draws too sharp a distinction between Confucians’ ethical standards and their political standards, thus veering perhaps a bit too far from the “conventional wisdom” that views Confucian politics as an extension of Confucian ethics. As I write in the book, “To the extent that the political standard is a normative standard, it is difficult to insist that it has nothing (...)
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  19. added 2017-07-13
    Heidegger and Mullā Ṣadrā on the Meaning of Metaphysics.Muhammad U. Faruque - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (3):629-650.
    The aim of the present study is to analyze the general outlook of Heidegger and Mullā Ṣadrā with regard to the meaning of metaphysics, occupying as it does a central position in their respective philosophies. It should first be made clear that “metaphysics” refers to First Philosophy or the scientia divina in the philosophical system of Ṣadrā.1 The English word “metaphysics” can be traced back to its etymological source in the Greek plural noun-phrase ta meta ta phusika, which became metaphysica (...)
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  20. added 2017-07-13
    Sūkṣma and the Clear and Distinct Light: The Path to Epistemic Enhancement in Yogic and Cartesian Meditation.Gary Jaeger - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (3):667-692.
    Yoga, like the other five orthodox schools or darśanas of Hindu philosophy, is primarily soteriological in purpose; it offers the hope of salvation from the inevitable suffering of life and the cycle of death and rebirth more broadly. Unlike the other darśanas, its prescribed method for achieving this salvation is meditation, by which the practitioner focuses his or her attention so as to become undisturbed by the fluctuations of his or her own consciousness caused by stimuli in the external world (...)
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  21. added 2017-07-13
    Merleau-Ponty and Nishida: "Interexpression" As Motor-Perceptual Faith.Loughnane Adam - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (3):710-737.
    Both Nishida Kitarō and Maurice Merleau-Ponty wrote extensively about artistic expression in their early works, yet in the last period of their careers that consideration is put mostly aside as they engage more directly with abstract ontological concerns. As this happens, a curiously overlooked concept becomes prominent in their writings, namely “faith.” While Merleau-Ponty’s is a “perceptual faith”, and Nishida’s is, broadly speaking, a religious faith, neither is strictly secular nor spiritual, yet both entail a remarkably similar ontology of the (...)
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  22. added 2017-07-13
    Structural Relations and Analogies in Classical Chinese Logic.Jana S. Rošker - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (3):841-863.
    The present article aims to expose some aspects of the specific features of classical Chinese analogisms. First, it exposes the supposition that this type of analogism did not focus exclusively on forms without considering their content, that is, that it was linguistically and semantically determined. Second, it also aims to show that classical Chinese analogies are based on structural relations between the objects in question, which constitute the similarity of two types of things that share certain attributes. This article additionally (...)
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  23. added 2017-07-13
    Philosophizing and Power: East–West Encounter in the Formation of Modern East Asian Buddhist Philosophy.Jin Y. Park - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (3):801-824.
    Philosophy claims that its goal is to search for truth. The history of philosophy, however, demonstrates that this search for truth has not been free from the power dynamics of respective eras. In this article, I claim that the formation of modern East Asian philosophy is one occasion in which the power structure of the time was visibly reflected. The East–West power imbalance at the beginning of the modern period was both implicitly and explicitly imbedded in the formation of modern (...)
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  24. added 2017-07-13
    A Reply to Professor El Amine.Elstein David - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (3):920-921.
    After reading Professor El Amine’s response to my review of her Classical Confucian Political Thought, I realize we are not as far apart on many issues as it appeared. Nevertheless, some areas of substantive disagreement remain. I will take the opportunity to highlight a couple of these. One is whether the good qualities expected of the common people should be properly considered virtues, that is, whether they are different in kind from the virtues that mark a superior man or even (...)
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  25. added 2017-07-13
    One Child: Do We Have a Right to Have More? By Sarah Conly.Hedberg Trevor - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (3):934-938.
    It is no secret that Earth is on the brink of an environmental crisis. At this point in the twenty-first century, we are familiar with the problems: climate change, biodiversity loss, and generally unsustainable patterns of consumption. Yet explicit discussion of how the rising human population contributes to these environmental problems or whether we morally ought to do something to curb population growth is relatively rare, despite the significance of these problems and the crucial role that population growth plays in (...)
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  26. added 2017-07-13
    Philosophy East/West: Exploring Intersections Between Educational and Contemplative Practices Ed. By Oren Ergas and Sharon Todd.Patrick Laude - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (3):938-940.
    Oren Ergas and Sharon Todd, the editors of Philosophy East/West: Exploring Intersections between Educational and Contemplative Practices, articulate the two main concerns of their project in the introduction. The first intent is to embrace a cross-philosophical approach that may integrate a wide spectrum of wisdom traditions the world over in order to maximize fruitful dialogue and cross-fertilization. The second is to take stock of the recent “contemplative turn” in education, as illustrated primarily by the growing contemporary trend to emphasize meditational (...)
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  27. added 2017-07-13
    The Philosophical Challenge From China Ed. By Brian Bruya.Sydney Morrow - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (3):948-951.
    The Philosophical Challenge from China, edited by Brian Bruya, undoubtedly occupies an important place in the discourse about what practices and authorities are relevant to Philosophy as an academic discipline. Its confident reorientation of philosophical relevance in the context of Anglophone academics will hopefully speak meaningfully to any remaining skeptics of the usefulness of Chinese philosophy. The intended audience of this effort, however, is shrinking, or, more accurately, those willing to be convinced are increasingly few, and what remains is simply (...)
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  28. added 2017-07-13
    John Dewey and East-West Philosophy.Jim Behuniak - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (3):908-916.
    The first two East-West Philosophers’ Conferences at the University of Hawai‘i constitute an important chapter in the history of comparative philosophy. Wing-tsit Chan recalls the first meeting in 1939 as a “very small beginning,” one that served primarily as the impetus for F.S.C. Northrop’s thesis that East and West represented two contrasting styles of thought. As Chan remembers, “we saw the world as two halves, East and West,” and in his subsequent 1946 work, The Meeting of East and West, Northrop (...)
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  29. added 2017-07-13
    The Prescriptive Dialectics of Li 禮 and Yi 義 in the Lienü Zhuan 列女傳.César Guarde-Paz - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (3):651-666.
    To articulate the past historically does not mean to recognize it “the way it really was”. It means to seize hold of a memory as it flashes up at a moment of danger. Ever since the advent of the May Fourth Movement in 1919, which marked a turning point in the process of intellectual modernization in the Republic of China, voices were raised against Confucian mores because they were considered cannibalistic, and against the influence they exerted upon the freedom and (...)
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  30. added 2017-07-13
    Acting-Intuition and the Achievement of Perception: Merleau-Ponty with Nishida.David W. Johnson - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (3):693-709.
    In the opening pages of the preface to Phenomenology of Perception, Merleau-Ponty characterizes phenomenology as a style of thinking whose “efforts are concentrated upon re-achieving a direct and primitive contact with the world, and endowing that contact with philosophical status” by describing things exactly as they present themselves, offering an account of the world as we live it prior to the second-order expression found in cultural constructions such as science.1 Like other thinkers in the phenomenological tradition, Merleau-Ponty discovers in the (...)
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  31. added 2017-07-13
    Schopenhauer's Compass: An Introduction to Schopenhauer's Philosophy and Its Origins by Urs App. [REVIEW]Ayon Maharaj - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (3):942-948.
    In the past several decades of scholarship on Arthur Schopenhauer, a cottage industry has emerged that investigates the relationship between Schopenhauer and Indian thought. Studies on Schopenhauer and Indian thought usually fall into one of three categories: comparative studies of Schopenhauer’s views and Indian philosophies such as Advaita Vedānta and Buddhism,1 studies on Schopenhauer’s reception of Indian thought,2 and studies examining the extent to which Indian sources might have influenced the development of Schopenhauer’s philosophical views.3 As early as 1816, Schopenhauer (...)
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  32. added 2017-07-12
    Making God Present: Place-Making and Ritual Healing in North India.S. Jassal Aftab - forthcoming - International Journal of Hindu Studies.
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  33. added 2017-07-12
    Women’s Leadership and Transnational Currents: The Adhiparasakthi Community in Toronto, Canada.Nanette R. Spina - forthcoming - International Journal of Hindu Studies.
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  34. added 2017-07-12
    Making Pushkar Paradise: Hindu Ritualization and the Environment.Drew Thomases - forthcoming - International Journal of Hindu Studies.
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  35. added 2017-07-12
    When the Goddess Speaks Her Mind: Possession, Presence, and Narrative Theology in the Gaṅgamma Tradition of Tirupati, South India.Joyce Burkhalter Flueckiger - forthcoming - International Journal of Hindu Studies.
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  36. added 2017-07-12
    Hay’s Buddhist Philosophy of Gestural Language.Joshua M. Hall - 2017 - Asian Philosophy 27 (3):175-188.
    The central role of gestural language in Buddhism is widely acknowledged, as in the story of the Buddha pointing at the moon, the point being the student’s seeing beyond the finger to its gesture. Gesture’s role in dance is similarly central, as noted by scholars in the emerging interdisciplinary field of dance studies. Unsurprisingly, then, the intersection of these two fields is well-populated, including the formal gestures Buddhism inherited from classical Indian dance, and the masked dance of the Mani Rimdu (...)
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  37. added 2017-07-11
    Chong, Kim-Chong, Zhuangzi’s Critique of the Confucians: Blinded by the Human.Paul J. D’Ambrosio - forthcoming - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy:1-4.
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  38. added 2017-07-11
    Confucius’ Opposition to the “New Music”.Kathleen Higgins - forthcoming - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy:1-15.
    Confucius condemned Zheng 鄭 and Wei 衛 music, which had widespread popular appeal. He may have expected music to display fundamental patterns in the natural world and thriving human relationships, tasks that could be compromised by irregular and relatively complicated music like that of Zheng and Wei. He was also convinced that Zheng and Wei music would motivate undisciplined behavior in listeners. A third consideration may have been that even if some benefits of participation would derive from music that included (...)
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  39. added 2017-07-11
    Music and Affect: The Influence of the Xing Zi Ming Chu on the Xunzi and Yueji.Franklin Perkins - forthcoming - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy:1-16.
    The Xing Zi Ming Chu 性自命出 presents a distinctive account of human dispositions that centers on the spontaneous arising of affects like joy and sadness. This focus on emotion grounds a particular conception of the function of music and ritual that gives music a central role in self-cultivation. Although the account of human dispositions in XZMC was ultimately overshadowed by the opposing views of Mengzi 孟子 and Xunzi 荀子 and the question of whether our dispositions are good or bad, its (...)
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  40. added 2017-07-11
    Jing, Haifeng 景海峰, and Zhao Dongming 趙東明, Hermeneutics and Confucian Thought 詮釋學與儒家思想.Yves Vendé - forthcoming - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy:1-4.
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  41. added 2017-07-11
    Musical Cultivation in the “Xiu Wen” Chapter of theShuoyuan.Scott Cook - forthcoming - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy:1-28.
    Aside from the Yue Ji 樂記, the “Xiu Wen 修文” chapter of the Shuoyuan 說苑 is perhaps our richest source of pre-Qin and early Han 漢 Confucian musical thought. Though woven together from earlier sources, “Xiu Wen” nonetheless manages to present its own distinctive expression of the role of music and its relationship to the greater system of ritual institutions. This article undertakes an examination of the chapter’s philosophies of ritual and music, focusing especially on the latter, and in the (...)
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  42. added 2017-07-11
    Zhuangzi and Musical Apophasis.David Chai - forthcoming - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy:1-16.
    Whether music is a catalyst for virtuous or licentious behavior, decadent or sparse thoughts, there is no doubting its importance to human civilization; but what of the sounds of Nature? For the Daoist philosopher Zhuangzi 莊子, the sounds of Nature are the epitome of what humanity calls music. Neither contrived nor laden with predispositions, they reflect the unity of things in Dao 道. Focusing on the xianchi 咸池 story in Chapter 14 of the Zhuangzi, this article argues that the true (...)
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  43. added 2017-07-11
    Musical Harmony in the Xunzi and the Lüshi Chunqiu: Different Implications of Musical Harmony Resulting From Their Dissimilar Approaches to the Concept of Resonance Between Sound and Qi.J. O. Jungeun - forthcoming - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy:1-17.
    This article discusses two interpretations of musical harmony around the 3rd century BCE based on the Xunzi 荀子 and the Lüshi Chunqiu 呂氏春秋, comparing the concepts of resonance between sound and qi 氣 in each interpretation. The Xunzi supports the moral influence of the sage kings’ music where ethical resonance between sound and bodily qi serves as firm ground for musical harmony begetting social harmony. In contrast, the Lüshi Chunqiu advocates the idea of physical resonance between sound and cosmic qi (...)
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  44. added 2017-07-08
    An Examination of the Relationship Between the Five Stages of the Yogacara Path to Enlightenment and the Ten Ox-Herding Pictures.Kyungbong Kim - 2017 - Asian Philosophy 27 (3):189-209.
    This study proposed to compare and analyze the five stages of cultivating the Yogâcāra path and the spiritual journey in the Ten Ox-Herding Pictures. To achieve this, the study investigated the core concepts and practice methods of the two approaches and analyzed their relations from the literatures reviewed. The results showed that the end goal of the two approaches is the same, the attainment of Buddhahood, with the two having common characteristics including the practice of being aware of the impermanent (...)
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  45. added 2017-07-07
    Guest Editor’s Introduction: Music and Philosophy in Early China.So Jeong Park - forthcoming - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy:1-2.
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  46. added 2017-07-07
    Li, Maozeng 李茂增, The Beauty Beyond Words: A Critical Biography of ZhuGuangqian無言之美: 朱光潛評傳.Weimin Sun - forthcoming - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy:1-5.
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  47. added 2017-07-06
    Xunzi and the Primitivists on Natural Spontaneity and Coercion.Frank Saunders - 2017 - Asian Philosophy 27 (3):210-226.
    This article explores two opposing views from Warring States China concerning the value of human natural spontaneity and large-scale government coercion. On the one hand, the Ruist philosopher Xunzi championed a comprehensive and coercive ethical, political, and social system or Way that he believed would lead to social order and moral cultivation while opposing people’s xìng. On the other hand, the authors of roughly books 8–10 of Zhuangzi, the primitivists, criticized a Way bearing a striking resemblance to Xunzi’s on the (...)
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  48. added 2017-07-03
    Review The Gathering of Intentions Indian Philosophy Blog May 2017. [REVIEW]Swami Narasimhananda - 2017 - Indian Philosophy Blog 5.
    This book could be seen as a novel method of tracing the history of a scripture. Jacob P. Dalton does this by “tracing the vicissitudes of a single ritual system—that of the Gathering of Intentions Sutra (Dgongs pa ’dus pa’i mdo)—from its ninth-century origins to the present day” (xv). This tantra is referred to as the “root tantra” and is vital for understanding the history of Tibetan Buddhism, particularly the Nyingma school. This book is divided into seven chapters focusing on (...)
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  49. added 2017-07-02
    Book Review An Introduction to Indian Philosophy Reading Religion May 2017. [REVIEW]Swami Narasimhananda - 2017 - Reading Religion 2 (5).
    Indian philosophy has been often denied the official designation of “philosophy,” and many academics around the world have dismissed it as vague theology, at best. The main reason for such a relegation has been the inaccessibility of the languages in which the source texts were written. This problem was aggravated by the lack of readable English translations. Though, beginning in the nineteenth century many books on Indian philosophy have been written in English, most of them are inaccessible to scholars outside (...)
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  50. added 2017-06-30
    Avivakṣitavācya-Dhvani and the Deterritorialization of Signifier: A Liberating Experience for Language, Author and Reader.V. S. Sreenath - forthcoming - Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-20.
    This paper aims to make an anti-canonical reading of the avivakṣitavācya-variety of dhvani conceptualized by the ninth century Sanskrit literary critic Ānandavardhana in his seminal work Dhvanyāloka. In this paper, I argue that avivakṣitavācya-dhvani opens up a signifier to new significations that are not conventionally associated with it through a process of deterritorialization. In any language, convention functions as a structuring mechanism upon a signifier by clearly demarcating a rigid semantic ambit for it. By the term ‘conventional semantic ambit’, I (...)
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