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  1. added 2020-06-30
    Euthanasia Laws, Slippery Slopes, and (Un)Reasonable Precaution.Friderik Klampfer - 2019 - Prolegomena: Časopis Za Filozofiju 18 (2):121-147.
    The article examines the so-called slippery slope argument (SSA) against the legalization of active voluntary euthanasia (AVE). According to the SSA, by legalizing AVE, the least morally controversial type of euthanasia, we will take the first step onto a slippery slope and inevitably end up in the moral abyss of widespread abuse and violations of the rights of the weakest and most vulnerable patients. In the first part of the paper, empirical evidence to the contrary is presented and analyzed: None (...)
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  2. added 2020-06-30
    Euthanasia Laws, Slippery Slopes, and (Un)Reasonable Precaution.Friderik Klampfer - 2019 - Prolegomena: Časopis Za Filozofiju 18 (2):121-147.
    The article examines the so-called slippery slope argument (SSA) against the legalization of active voluntary euthanasia (AVE). According to the SSA, by legalizing AVE, the least morally controversial type of euthanasia, we will take the first step onto a slippery slope and inevitably end up in the moral abyss of widespread abuse and violations of the rights of the weakest and most vulnerable patients. In the first part of the paper, empirical evidence to the contrary is presented and analyzed: None (...)
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  3. added 2020-06-23
    The Meaning of Killing. [REVIEW]Nicolas Delon - 2018 - Books and Ideas 2018.
    Why do we consider killing and letting someone die to be two different things? Why do we believe that a doctor who refuses to treat a terminally ill patient is doing anything less than administering a lethal substance? After all, the consequences are the same, and perhaps the moral status of these acts should be judged accordingly. -/- Reviewed: Jonathan Glover, Questions de vie ou de mort (Causing Death and Saving Lives), translated into French and introduced by Benoît Basse, Genève, (...)
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  4. added 2020-06-16
    Physician-Assisted Death in Perspective: Assessing the Dutch Experience. Edited by S. J. Youngner and G. K. Kimsma. Cambridge University Press, 2012, 403pp., £62. ISBN: 9781107007567. [REVIEW]Kevin Fitzpatrick - 2014 - Philosophy 89 (4):649-653.
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  5. added 2020-05-19
    A Kantian View of Suicide and End‐of‐Life Treatment.Martin Gunderson - 2004 - Journal of Social Philosophy 35 (2):277-287.
  6. added 2020-04-23
    Human Dignity in Contemporary Ethics.David Kirchhoffer - 2013 - New York: Teneo Press.
    Human Dignity in Contemporary Ethics develops a holistic and relevant understanding of human dignity for ethics today. Whilst critics of the concept of human dignity call for its dismissal, and many of its defenders rehearse the same old arguments, this book offers an alternative set of methodological assumptions on which to base a revitalized and practical understanding of human dignity, which at the same time overcomes the challenges that the concept currently faces. The Component Dimensions of Human Dignity model enables (...)
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  7. added 2020-04-19
    Dignity and Assisted Dying: What Kant Got Right (and Wrong).Michael Cholbi - 2018 - In Human Dignity and Assisted Death. pp. 143-160.
    That Kant’s moral thought is invoked by both advocates and opponents of a right to assisted dying attests to both the allure and and the elusiveness of Kant’s moral thought. In particular, the theses that individuals have a right to a ‘death with dignity’ and that assisting someone to die contravenes her dignity appear to gesture at one of Kant’s signature moral notions, dignity. The purposes of this article are to outline Kant’s understanding of dignity and its implications for the (...)
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  8. added 2020-02-11
    The Least Worst Death: Essays in Bioethics on the End of Life.Arthur L. Caplan - 1996 - Ethics 106 (4):876-879.
  9. added 2020-02-11
    Ethics in the Sanctuary: Examining the Practices of Organized Religion.Henry Veatch - 1991 - Ethics 101 (4):887-889.
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  10. added 2020-01-29
    Euthanasia Examined: Ethical, Clinical and Legal Perspectives Edited by John Keown.Audrey K. Gordon - 1997 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 40 (2):308-309.
  11. added 2020-01-29
    Legal Frontiers of Death and Dying.Robert M. Walker - 1989 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 32 (2):310-313.
  12. added 2020-01-29
    Life or Death—Who Controls? Ed. By Nancy C. Ostheimer and John M. Ostheimer.Erwin Di Cyan - 1977 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 20 (2):311-313.
  13. added 2020-01-20
    A Different Death: Euthanasia and the Christian Tradition By Edward J. Larson and Darrel W. Amundsen.Audrey K. Gordon - 1999 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 42 (3):450-452.
  14. added 2020-01-20
    When Death Is Sought: Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia in the Medical Context.Christine K. Cassel - 1995 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 38 (3):511-512.
  15. added 2020-01-20
    The Art of Dying.Russell Noyes - 1971 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 14 (3):432-447.
  16. added 2020-01-15
    The Case for an Autonomy-Centered View of Physician-Assisted Death.Jeremy Davis & Eric Mathison - forthcoming - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-12.
    Most people who defend physician-assisted death (PAD) endorse the Joint View, which holds that two conditions—autonomy and welfare—must be satisfied for PAD to be justified. In this paper, we defend an Autonomy Only view. We argue that the welfare condition is either otiose on the most plausible account of the autonomy condition, or else is implausibly restrictive, particularly once we account for the broad range of reasons patients cite for desiring PAD, such as “tired of life” cases. Moreover, many of (...)
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  17. added 2020-01-13
    The Right to Life, Voluntary Euthanasia, and Termination of Life on Request.Elias Moser - 2017 - Philosophy Study 7 (8):445-454.
    In this article, the logical implications of a right to life are examined. It is first argued that the prohibition of Termination of life on request confers an inalienable right to life. A right is inalienable if it cannot legitimately be waived or transferred. Since voluntary euthanasia entails waiver of the right to life, the inalienability yields that it cannot be justified. Therefore, any ethical position that is in favor of voluntary euthanasia has to argue that the right to life (...)
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  18. added 2020-01-10
    Palliative Opioid Use, Palliative Sedation and Euthanasia: Reaffirming the Distinction.Guy Schofield, Idris Baker, Rachel Bullock, Hannah Clare, Paul Clark, Derek Willis, Craig Gannon & Rob George - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (1):48-50.
    We read with interest the extended essay published from Riisfeldt and are encouraged by an empirical ethics article which attempts to ground theory and its claims in the real world. However, such attempts also have real-world consequences. We are concerned to read the paper’s conclusion that clinical evidence weakens the distinction between euthanasia and normal palliative care prescribing. This is important. Globally, the most significant barrier to adequate symptom control in people with life-limiting illness is poor access to opioid analgesia. (...)
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  19. added 2019-11-01
    Commentary on "Suicide, Euthanasia, and the Psychiatrist".Kelleher Michael J. - forthcoming - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 5 (2):145-149.
  20. added 2019-11-01
    Commentary on" Suicide, Euthanasia, and the Psychiatrist".John W. Burnside - 1998 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 5 (2):141-143.
  21. added 2019-10-10
    Against Recategorizing Physician-Assisted Suicide.Philip Reed - forthcoming - Public Affairs Quarterly.
    There is a growing trend among some physicians, psychiatrists, bioethicists, and other mental health professionals not to treat physician-assisted suicide (PAS) as suicide. The grounds for doing so are that PAS fundamentally differs from other suicides. Perhaps most notably, in 2017 the American Association of Suicidology argued that PAS is distinct from the behavior that their organization seeks to prevent. This paper compares and contrasts suicide and PAS in order to see how much overlap there is. Contrary to the emerging (...)
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  22. added 2019-09-30
    Deep Uncertainties in the Criteria for Physician Aid-in-Dying for Psychiatric Patients.Piotr Grzegorz Nowak & Tomasz Żuradzki - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (10):54-56.
    In their insightful article, Brent Kious and Margaret Battin (2019) correctly identify an inconsistency between an involuntary psychiatric commitment for suicide prevention and physician aid in dying (PAD). They declare that it may be possible to resolve the problem by articulating “objective standards for evaluating the severity of others’ suffering,” but ultimately they admit that this task is beyond the scope of their article since the solution depends on “a deep and difficult” question about comparing the worseness of two possible (...)
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  23. added 2019-08-30
    Is the Exclusion of Psychiatric Patients From Access to Physician-Assisted Suicide Discriminatory?Joshua James Hatherley - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (12):817-820.
    Advocates of physician-assisted suicide often argue that, although the provision of PAS is morally permissible for persons with terminal, somatic illnesses, it is impermissible for patients suffering from psychiatric conditions. This claim is justified on the basis that psychiatric illnesses have certain morally relevant characteristics and/or implications that distinguish them from their somatic counterparts. In this paper, I address three arguments of this sort. First, that psychiatric conditions compromise a person’s decision-making capacity. Second, that we cannot have sufficient certainty that (...)
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  24. added 2019-06-07
    Ronald Dworkin, « Assisted Suicide : What the Court Really Said », The New York Review of Books, 25 septembre 1997, p. 40-44.Ronald Dworkin, « Assisted Suicide : What the Court Really Said », The New York Review of Books, 25 septembre 1997, p. 40-44. [REVIEW]Pierre-Yves Bonin - 1998 - Philosophiques 25 (2):306-311.
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  25. added 2019-06-06
    Response: A Defence of a New Perspective on Euthanasia.David Shaw - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (2):123-125.
    In two recent papers, Hugh McLachlan, Jacob Busch and Raffaele Rodogno have criticised my new perspective on euthanasia. Each paper analyses my argument and suggests two flaws. McLachlan identifies what he sees as important points regarding the justification of legal distinctions in the absence of corresponding moral differences and the professional role of the doctor. Busch and Rodogno target my criterion of brain life, arguing that it is a necessary but not sufficient condition and that it is not generalisable. In (...)
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  26. added 2019-06-06
    Select This Article Paper: Legal Physician-Assisted Suicide in Oregon and The Netherlands: Evidence Concerning the Impact on Patients in Vulnerable Groups—Another Perspective on Oregon's Data.I. G. Finlay & R. George - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (3):171-174.
    Battin et al examined data on deaths from physician-assisted suicide in Oregon and on PAS and voluntary euthanasia in The Netherlands. This paper reviews the methodology used in their examination and questions the conclusions drawn from it—namely, that there is for the most part ‘no evidence of heightened risk’ to vulnerable people from the legalisation of PAS or VE. This critique focuses on the evidence about PAS in Oregon. It suggests that vulnerability to PAS cannot be categorised simply by reference (...)
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  27. added 2019-06-06
    Paper: A Test for Mental Capacity to Request Assisted Suicide.Cameron Stewart, Carmelle Peisah & Brian Draper - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (1):34-39.
    The mental competence of people requesting aid-in-dying is a key issue for the how the law responds to cases of assisted suicide. A number of cases from around the common law world have highlighted the importance of competence in determining whether assistants should be prosecuted, and what they will be prosecuted for. Nevertheless, the law remains uncertain about how competence should be tested in these cases. This article proposes a test of competence that is based on the existing common law (...)
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  28. added 2019-06-06
    Suffering in the Context of Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide: Transcending Job Through Wojtyla's Anthropology: Articles.Ashley K. Fernandes - 2010 - Christian Bioethics 16 (3):257-273.
    The debate over euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide continues to ignore the philosophical anthropology on which certain critical claims rest. In this paper, I offer several anthropologically based arguments against one prominent justification for EPAS: the Argument from the Evil of Suffering. I demonstrate that the argument is, at its core, a utilitarian one, and that a sound rebuttal can be found by examining Karol Wojtyla/Pope John Paul II's view of suffering as a transformative experience for the human person. Wojtyla both (...)
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  29. added 2019-06-06
    Hugh Trevor-Roper, Europe's Physician: The Various Life of Sir Theodore de Mayerne. New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2006. Pp. Xii+438. ISBN 0-300-11263-7. $35.00. £25.00. [REVIEW]Sarah Hutton - 2009 - British Journal for the History of Science 42 (3):456.
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  30. added 2019-06-06
    Suicide Assisted by Two Swiss Right-to-Die Organisations.S. Fischer, C. A. Huber, L. Imhof, R. Mahrer Imhof & M. Furter - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (11):810-814.
    Background: In Switzerland, non-medical right-to-die organisations such as Exit Deutsche Schweiz and Dignitas offer suicide assistance to members suffering from incurable diseases.Objectives: First, to determine whether differences exist between the members who received assistance in suicide from Exit Deutsche Schweiz and Dignitas. Second, to investigate whether the practices of Exit Deutsche Schweiz have changed since the 1990s.Methods: This study analysed all cases of assisted suicide facilitated by Exit Deutsche Schweiz and Dignitas between 2001 and 2004 and investigated by the University (...)
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  31. added 2019-06-06
    Review of Timothy E. Quill and Margaret P. Battin , Physician-Assisted Dying: The Case for Palliative Care & Patient Care 1 and Kathleen Foley and Herbert Hendin , The Case Against Assisted Suicide: For the Right to End-of-Life Care.2. [REVIEW]C. Wayne Mayhall - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (11):48-50.
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  32. added 2019-06-06
    Physician-Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia: German Protestantism, Conscience, and the Limits of Purely Ethical Reflection.P. Bartmann - 2003 - Christian Bioethics 9 (2-3):203-225.
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  33. added 2019-06-06
    Why Physician-Assisted Suicide Perpetuates the Idolatry of Medicine.M. J. Cherry - 2003 - Christian Bioethics 9 (2-3):245-271.
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  34. added 2019-06-06
    Physician-Assisted Suicide, Euthanasia, and Christian Bioethics: Moral Controversy in Germany.A. T. May - 2003 - Christian Bioethics 9 (2-3):273-283.
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  35. added 2019-06-06
    Euthanasia, Assisted Suicide, and the Philosophical Anthropology of Karol Wojtyla.A. K. Fernandes - 2001 - Christian Bioethics 7 (3):379-402.
    The lack of consensus in American society regarding the permissibility of assisted suicide and euthanasia is due in large part to a failure to address the nature of the human person involved in the ethical act itself. For Karol Wojtyla, philosopher and Pope, ethical action finds meaning only in an authentic understanding of the person; but it is through acting (actus humanus) alone that the human person reveals himself. Knowing what the person ought to be cannot be divorced from what (...)
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  36. added 2019-06-06
    The Right to Privacy and the Right to Die: TOM L. BEAUCHAMP.Tom L. Beauchamp - 2000 - Social Philosophy and Policy 17 (2):276-292.
    Western ethics and law have been slow to come to conclusions about the right to choose the time and manner of one's death. However, policies, practices, and legal precedents have evolved quickly in the last quarter of the twentieth century, from the forgoing of respirators to the use of Do Not Resuscitate orders, to the forgoing of all medical technologies, and now, in one U.S. state, to legalized physician-assisted suicide. The sweep of history—from the Quinlan case in New Jersey to (...)
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  37. added 2019-06-06
    Drug Use in Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia: Edited by Margaret P Battin and Arthur G Lipman, New York, Pharmaceutical Products Press, 1996, 360 Pages, US$36.00. [REVIEW]Rebecca Bennett - 2000 - Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (3):222-223.
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  38. added 2019-06-06
    Suicide: Right or Wrong? Edited by John Donnelly, Amherst, New York, Prometheus Books, 1998, 335 Pages,£ 14.99 Sc. [REVIEW]Tim Helme - 2000 - Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (1):78-78.
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  39. added 2019-06-06
    Physician-Assisted Death: Doctrinal Development Vs. Christian Tradition.H. T. Engelhardt - 1998 - Christian Bioethics 4 (2):115-121.
    Physician-assisted suicide offers a moral and theological Rorschach test. Foundational commitments regarding morality and theology are disclosed by how the issue is perceived and by what moral problems it is seen to present. One of the cardinal differences disclosed is that between Western and Orthodox Christian approaches to theology in general, and the theology of dying and suicide in particular. Confrontation with the issue of suicide is likely to bring further doctrinal development in many of the Western Christian religions, so (...)
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  40. added 2019-06-06
    Faith and Reason and Physician-Assisted Suicide.C. Kaczor - 1998 - Christian Bioethics 4 (2):183-201.
    Aquinas's conception of the relationship of faith and reason calls into question the arguments and some of the conclusions advanced in contributions to the debate on physician-assisted suicide by David Thomasma and H. Tristram Engelhardt. An understanding of the nature of theology as based on revelation calls into question Thomasma's theological argument in favor of physician-assisted suicide based on the example of Christ and the martyrs. On the other hand, unaided reason calls into question his assumptions about the nature of (...)
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  41. added 2019-06-06
    Physician-Assisted Suicide Reconsidered: Dying as a Christian in a Post-Christian Age.H. T. Engelhardt - 1998 - Christian Bioethics 4 (2):143-167.
    The traditional Christian focus concerning dying is on repentance, not dignity. The goal of a traditional Christian death is not a pleasing, final chapter to life, but union with God: holiness. The pursuit of holiness requires putting on Christ and accepting His cross. In contrast, post-traditional Christian and secular concerns with self-determination, control, dignity, and self-esteem make physician-assisted suicide and voluntary active euthanasia plausible moral choices. Such is not the case within the context of the traditional Christian experience of God, (...)
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  42. added 2019-06-06
    Assisted Death and Martyrdom.D. C. Thomasma - 1998 - Christian Bioethics 4 (2):122-142.
    Against the backdrop of ancient, mediaeval and modern Catholic teaching prohibiting killing (the rule against killing), the question of assisted suicide and euthanasia is examined. In the past the Church has modified its initial repugnance for killing by developing specific guidelines for permitting killing under strict conditions. This took place with respect to capital punishment and a just war, for example. One wonders why in the least objectionable instance, when a person is already dying, suffering, and repeatedly requesting assistance in (...)
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  43. added 2019-06-06
    Laying Down One's Life for Oneself.W. E. Stempsey - 1998 - Christian Bioethics 4 (2):202-224.
    Roman Catholicism has long opposed suicide. Although Scripture neither condones nor condemns suicide explicitly, cases in the Bible that are purported to be suicides fall into several different categories, and the Roman Catholic tradition can show why some of these should be considered morally wrong and some should not. While Christian martyrdom is praised, it is not correct to argue that this Christian outlook invites suicide, or that it recommends physician-assisted suicide for altruistic motives. Church Tradition, from its earliest days, (...)
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  44. added 2019-06-06
    Natural Death and the Work of Perfection.A. Young - 1998 - Christian Bioethics 4 (2):168-182.
    The historic or traditional Christian view of pain (suffering) and death, especially as preserved by the Christian East (i.e., the Orthodox), is radically opposed to the modern secular obsession with avoidance of pain. Everything about this life has its goal or aim in a mystical reality, the Kingdom of Heaven, for which earthly life is a preparation. While neither illness nor health are seen as ends in themselves, both are viewed as proceeding from the will of God for our benefit (...)
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  45. added 2019-06-06
    Margaret Battin, Howard Brody, Patricia Marshall, and Robyn Shapiro on Physician-Aided Death.Dana Swartzberg - 1996 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 5 (1):131-137.
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  46. added 2019-06-06
    The Least Worst Death. [REVIEW]Julian Savulescu - 1996 - Journal of Medical Ethics 22 (3):183-187.
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  47. added 2019-06-06
    Refelctions on the State of Current Debate Over Physician‐Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia.Earl Winkler - 1995 - Bioethics 9 (3):313-326.
    This paper is part of a larger project. My overall aim is to argue that the evolution of familiar forms of termination of life sustaining treatment, constituting so called passive euthanasia,1 has severaly undercut the logic of every form of reasoning that has traditionally been used to oppose active euthanasia and assistance in suicide. Basically, there are two such forms of traditional opposition, each represented in a range of different versions. There is the inevitable argument concerning social utilities — that (...)
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  48. added 2019-06-06
    Dr Kevorkian and the Struggle for Physician‐Assisted Dying.Greg Pence - 1995 - Bioethics 9 (1):62-71.
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  49. added 2019-06-05
    Book Review: Neil M. Gorsuch, The Future of Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia . Xi + 311 Pp. £18.95 , ISBN 978—0691—12458—2. [REVIEW]Wendy E. Hiscox - 2008 - Studies in Christian Ethics 21 (2):300-303.
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  50. added 2019-06-05
    Perspective: Can a Physician Always Be Compassionate?Renate G. Justin - 2000 - Hastings Center Report 30 (4):26.
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