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  1. Aristotle on the Nature and Politics of Medicine.Samuel H. Baker - forthcoming - Apeiron.
    According to Aristotle, the medical art aims at health, which is a virtue of the body, and does so in an unlimited way. Consequently, medicine does not determine the extent to which health should be pursued, and “mental health” falls under medicine only via pros hen predication. Because medicine is inherently oriented to its end, it produces health in accordance with its nature and disease contrary to its nature—even when disease is good for the patient. Aristotle’s politician understands that this (...)
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  2. Margaret P. Battin is Professor of Phi-Losophy at the University of Utah. She Recently Authored Ending Life (Oxford, 2005) and Coauthored The Patient as Victim and Vector: Ethics and Infectious.Daniel Callahan, Gary Duhon & Ellen K. Feder - forthcoming - Hastings Center Report.
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  3. The Missing Link: The Physician and Assisted Suicide.Amir Halevy - forthcoming - Bioethics Forum.
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  4. Physician.James Jelinek & Melanie Howard - forthcoming - Bioethics.
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  5. Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide.Michael Langford - forthcoming - Christians and Bioethics.
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  6. Regent Demographic Developments in Switzerland.Kurt Mayer - forthcoming - Social Research.
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  7. Commentary on "Suicide, Euthanasia, and the Psychiatrist".Kelleher Michael J. - forthcoming - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 5 (2):145-149.
  8. At Law: Constitutional Flaw?Carl E. Schneider - forthcoming - Hastings Center Report.
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  9. The Discovery and Development of Dolphin-Assisted Therapy.B. Smith - forthcoming - Between Species: Celebrating the Dolphin-Human Bond. Sierra Club Books, San Francisco.
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  10. When Suffering is Unbearable: Physicians, Assisted Suicide, and Euthanasia.John R. Williams - forthcoming - Journal of Palliative Care.
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  11. The Physician.Kazem Sadegh-Zadeh - 2nd ed. 2015 - In Handbook of Analytic Philosophy of Medicine. Springer Verlag.
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  12. Autonomy, Voluntariness and Assisted Dying.Ben Colburn - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (5):316-319.
    Ethical arguments about assisted dying often focus on whether or not respect for an individual’s autonomy gives a reason to offer them an assisted death if they want it. In this paper, I present an argument for legalising assisted dying which appeals to the autonomy of people who don’t want to die. Adding that option can transform the nature of someone’s choice set, enabling them to pursue other options voluntarily where that would otherwise be harder or impossible. This does not (...)
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  13. The Case for an Autonomy-Centred View of Physician-Assisted Death.Jeremy Davis & Eric Mathison - 2020 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 17 (3):345-356.
    Most people who defend physician-assisted death (PAD) endorse the Joint View, which holds that two conditions—autonomy and welfare—must be satisfied for PAD to be justified. In this paper, we defend an Autonomy Only view. We argue that the welfare condition is either otiose on the most plausible account of the autonomy condition, or else is implausibly restrictive, particularly once we account for the broad range of reasons patients cite for desiring PAD, such as “tired of life” cases. Moreover, many of (...)
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  14. Against Recategorizing Physician-Assisted Suicide.Philip Reed - 2020 - Public Affairs Quarterly 34 (1):50-71.
    There is a growing trend among some physicians, psychiatrists, bioethicists, and other mental health professionals not to treat physician-assisted suicide (PAS) as suicide. The grounds for doing so are that PAS fundamentally differs from other suicides. Perhaps most notably, in 2017 the American Association of Suicidology argued that PAS is distinct from the behavior that their organization seeks to prevent. This paper compares and contrasts suicide and PAS in order to see how much overlap there is. Contrary to the emerging (...)
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  15. Palliative Opioid Use, Palliative Sedation and Euthanasia: Reaffirming the Distinction.Guy Schofield, Idris Baker, Rachel Bullock, Hannah Clare, Paul Clark, Derek Willis, Craig Gannon & Rob George - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 46 (1):48-50.
    We read with interest the extended essay published from Riisfeldt and are encouraged by an empirical ethics article which attempts to ground theory and its claims in the real world. However, such attempts also have real-world consequences. We are concerned to read the paper’s conclusion that clinical evidence weakens the distinction between euthanasia and normal palliative care prescribing. This is important. Globally, the most significant barrier to adequate symptom control in people with life-limiting illness is poor access to opioid analgesia. (...)
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  16. The Morality of Euthanasia.Adam Greif - 2019 - Organon F: Medzinárodný Časopis Pre Analytickú Filozofiu 26 (4):612–634.
    In this paper, I defend the view that the requested euthanasia of adults is morally permissible and should be legalised; I use an argument from analogy which compares physician-assisted euthanasia with morally less ambiguous and, in my opinion, an acceptable instance of mercy killing. I also respond to several objections that either try to prove that the instance of mercy killing is not acceptable, or that there is a fundamental difference between these two cases of killing. Furthermore, in the remainder (...)
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  17. Is the Exclusion of Psychiatric Patients From Access to Physician-Assisted Suicide Discriminatory?Joshua James Hatherley - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (12):817-820.
    Advocates of physician-assisted suicide often argue that, although the provision of PAS is morally permissible for persons with terminal, somatic illnesses, it is impermissible for patients suffering from psychiatric conditions. This claim is justified on the basis that psychiatric illnesses have certain morally relevant characteristics and/or implications that distinguish them from their somatic counterparts. In this paper, I address three arguments of this sort. First, that psychiatric conditions compromise a person’s decision-making capacity. Second, that we cannot have sufficient certainty that (...)
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  18. Scheinneutralität: Über einen Vorschlag zur Regelung des assistierten Suizids und die Frage nach der Legitimität seines gesetzlichen Verbots.Roland Kipke - 2019 - In Olivia Mitscherlich-Schönherr (ed.), Gelingendes Sterben: Zeitgenössische Theorien Im Interdisziplinären Dialog. De Gruyter. pp. 299-326.
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  19. Euthanasia Laws, Slippery Slopes, and (Un)Reasonable Precaution.Friderik Klampfer - 2019 - Prolegomena: Časopis Za Filozofiju 18 (2):121-147.
    The article examines the so-called slippery slope argument (SSA) against the legalization of active voluntary euthanasia (AVE). According to the SSA, by legalizing AVE, the least morally controversial type of euthanasia, we will take the first step onto a slippery slope and inevitably end up in the moral abyss of widespread abuse and violations of the rights of the weakest and most vulnerable patients. In the first part of the paper, empirical evidence to the contrary is presented and analyzed: None (...)
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  20. Euthanasia Laws, Slippery Slopes, and (Un)Reasonable Precaution.Friderik Klampfer - 2019 - Prolegomena: Časopis Za Filozofiju 18 (2):121-147.
    The article examines the so-called slippery slope argument (SSA) against the legalization of active voluntary euthanasia (AVE). According to the SSA, by legalizing AVE, the least morally controversial type of euthanasia, we will take the first step onto a slippery slope and inevitably end up in the moral abyss of widespread abuse and violations of the rights of the weakest and most vulnerable patients. In the first part of the paper, empirical evidence to the contrary is presented and analyzed: None (...)
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  21. Euthanasia, or Mercy Killing.Nathan Nobis - 2019 - 1000-Word Philosophy: An Introductory Anthology.
    Sadly, there are people in very bad medical conditions who want to die. They are in pain, they are suffering, and they no longer find their quality of life to be at an acceptable level anymore. -/- When people like this are kept alive by machines or other medical treatments, can it be morally permissible to let them die? -/- Advocates of “passive euthanasia” argue that it can be. Their reasons, however, suggest that it can sometimes be not wrong to (...)
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  22. Deep Uncertainties in the Criteria for Physician Aid-in-Dying for Psychiatric Patients.Piotr Grzegorz Nowak & Tomasz Żuradzki - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (10):54-56.
    In their insightful article, Brent Kious and Margaret Battin (2019) correctly identify an inconsistency between an involuntary psychiatric commitment for suicide prevention and physician aid in dying (PAD). They declare that it may be possible to resolve the problem by articulating “objective standards for evaluating the severity of others’ suffering,” but ultimately they admit that this task is beyond the scope of their article since the solution depends on “a deep and difficult” question about comparing the worseness of two possible (...)
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  23. The Right to Die Revisited.Evangelos D. Protopapadakis - 2019 - In Proceedings from the Second International interdisciplinary conference „BIOETHICS – THE SIGN OF A NEW ERA”. Skopje, North Macedonia: pp. 53-65.
    In this short paper I will discuss the ambiguous and, even, controversial term ‘right to die’ in the context of the euthanasia debate and, in particular, in the case of passive euthanasia. First I will present the major objections towards the moral legitimacy of a right to die, most of which I also endorse myself; then I will investigate whether the right to die could acquire adequate moral justification in the case of passive euthanasia. In the light of the Kantian (...)
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  24. Suffering at the End of Life.Jukka Varelius - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (1):195-200.
    In the end‐of‐life context, alleviation of the suffering of a distressed patient is usually seen as a, if not the, central goal for the medical personnel treating her. Yet it has also been argued that suffering should be seen as a part of good dying. More precisely, it has been maintained that alleviating a dying patient’s suffering can make her unable to take care of practical end‐of‐life matters, deprive her of an opportunity to ask questions about and find meaning in (...)
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  25. Palliation and Medically Assisted Dying: A Case Study in the Use of Slippery Slope Arguments in Public Policy.Michael Cholbi - 2018 - In David Boonin (ed.), The Palgrave Handbook of Philosophy and Public Policy. Springer Verlag. pp. 691-702.
    Opponents of medically assisted dying have long appealed to ‘slippery slope’ arguments. One such slippery slope concerns palliative care: that the introduction of medically assisted dying will lead to a diminution in the quality or availability or palliative care for patients near the end of their lives. Empirical evidence from jurisdictions where assisted dying has been practiced for decades, such as Oregon and the Netherlands, indicate that such worries are largely unfounded. The failure of the palliation slope argument is nevertheless (...)
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  26. Dignity and Assisted Dying: What Kant Got Right (and Wrong).Michael Cholbi - 2018 - In Human Dignity and Assisted Death. pp. 143-160.
    That Kant’s moral thought is invoked by both advocates and opponents of a right to assisted dying attests to both the allure and and the elusiveness of Kant’s moral thought. In particular, the theses that individuals have a right to a ‘death with dignity’ and that assisting someone to die contravenes her dignity appear to gesture at one of Kant’s signature moral notions, dignity. The purposes of this article are to outline Kant’s understanding of dignity and its implications for the (...)
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  27. The Meaning of Killing. [REVIEW]Nicolas Delon - 2018 - Books and Ideas 2018.
    Why do we consider killing and letting someone die to be two different things? Why do we believe that a doctor who refuses to treat a terminally ill patient is doing anything less than administering a lethal substance? After all, the consequences are the same, and perhaps the moral status of these acts should be judged accordingly. -/- Reviewed: Jonathan Glover, Questions de vie ou de mort (Causing Death and Saving Lives), translated into French and introduced by Benoît Basse, Genève, (...)
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  28. Murdering an Accident Victim: A New Objection to the Bare-Difference Argument.Scott Hill - 2018 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 96 (4):767-778.
    Many philosophers, psychologists, and medical practitioners believe that killing is no worse than letting die on the basis of James Rachels's Bare-Difference Argument. I show that his argument is unsound. In particular, a premise of the argument is that his examples are as similar as is consistent with one being a case of killing and the other being a case of letting die. However, the subject who lets die has both the ability to kill and the ability to let die (...)
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  29. Śmierć mózgowa – zmiana w rozumieniu człowieka?Jacek Meller - 2018 - Diametros 56:151-156.
    Review of the book: Człowiek na granicy istnienia. Dyskusje o śmierci mózgowej i innych aspektach umierania, Grzegorz Hołub, Piotr Duchliński, Akademia Ignatianum w Krakowie, Wydawnictwo WAM, Kraków 2017.
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  30. How Should One Live? An Introduction to Ethics and Moral Reasoning.Bradley Thames - 2018 - San Diego, CA, USA: Bridgepoint Education.
    This book provides an entry-level introduction to philosophical ethics, theories of moral reasoning, and selected issues in applied ethics. Chapter 1 describes the importance of philosophical approaches to ethical issues, the general dialectical form of moral reasoning, and the broad landscape of moral philosophy. Chapter 2 presents egoism and relativism as challenges to the presumed objectivity and unconditionality of morality. Chapters 3, 4 and 5 discuss utilitarianism, deontology, and virtue ethics, respectively. Each chapter begins with a general overview of the (...)
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  31. You Should Not Have Let Your Baby Die.Gary Comstock - 2017 July 12 - New York Times.
    Sam, your newborn son, has been suffocating in your arms for the past 15 minutes. You’re as certain as you can be that he is going to die in the next 15.
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  32. Four Reasons Why Assisted Dying Should Not Be Offered for Depression.Thomas Blikshavn, Tonje Lossius Husum & Morten Magelssen - 2017 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 14 (1):151-157.
    Recently, several authors have argued that assisted dying may be ethically appropriate when requested by a person who suffers from serious depression unresponsive to treatment. We here present four arguments to the contrary. First, the arguments made by proponents of assisted dying rely on notions of “treatment-resistant depression” that are problematic. Second, an individual patient suffering from depression may not be justified in believing that chances of recovery are minimal. Third, the therapeutic significance of hope must be acknowledged; when mental (...)
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  33. The Right to Life, Voluntary Euthanasia, and Termination of Life on Request.Elias Moser - 2017 - Philosophy Study 7 (8):445-454.
    In this article, the logical implications of a right to life are examined. It is first argued that the prohibition of Termination of life on request confers an inalienable right to life. A right is inalienable if it cannot legitimately be waived or transferred. Since voluntary euthanasia entails waiver of the right to life, the inalienability yields that it cannot be justified. Therefore, any ethical position that is in favor of voluntary euthanasia has to argue that the right to life (...)
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  34. Can Suicide in the Elderly Be Rational?Lawrence Nelson & Erick Ramirez - 2017 - In Robert E. McCue & Meera Balasubramaniam (eds.), Rational Suicide in the Elderly Clinical, Ethical, and Sociocultural Aspects. Springer. pp. 1-21.
    In this chapter, we consider, and reject, the claim that all elderly patients’ desires for suicide are irrational. The same reasons that have led to a growing acceptance for the rationality of suicide in terminal cases should lead us to view other desires for suicide as possibly rational. In both cases, desires for suicide can and do materialize in the absence of mental illness. Furthermore, we claim that desires for suicide can remain rational even in the face of some mental (...)
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  35. “We Need to Talk!” Barriers to GPs’ Communication About the Option of Physician-Assisted Suicide and Their Ethical Implications: Results From a Qualitative Study.Ina C. Otte, Corinna Jung, Bernice Elger & Klaus Bally - 2017 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 20 (2):249-256.
    GPs usually care for their patients for an extended period of time, therefore, requests to not only discontinue a patient’s treatment but to assist a patient in a suicide are likely to create intensely stressful situations for physicians. However, in order to ensure the best patient care possible, the competent communication about the option of physician assisted suicide as well as the assessment of the origin and sincerity of the request are very important. This is especially true, since patients’ requests (...)
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  36. Advance Directives for Euthanasia.Eric Vogelstein - 2017 - In Michael J. Cholbi (ed.), Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide: Global Views on Choosing to End Life. Santa Barbara, CA: Praeger. pp. 327-350.
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  37. Spinoza on Conatus, Inertia, and the Impossibility of Self-Destruction.Filip A. A. Buyse - 2016 - Society and Politics 10 (2):115-134.
    Spinoza (1632-1677) writes in the fourth proposition of the third part of his masterpiece, the Ethics (1677), the bold statement that self-destruction is impossible. This view seems to be very hard to understand given the fact that in our western world we have recently been confronted with an increasing number of suicides, all of which are - per definition – ―actions of killing oneself deliberately‖. Firstly, this article aims at showing, based on the last chapter of the first part of (...)
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  38. Should Health Care Providers Uphold the DNR of a Terminally Ill Patient Who Attempts Suicide?Lisa Campo-Engelstein, Jane Jankowski & Marcy Mullen - 2016 - HEC Forum 28 (2):169-174.
    An individual’s right to refuse life-sustaining treatment is a fundamental expression of patient autonomy; however, supporting this right poses ethical dilemmas for healthcare providers when the patient has attempted suicide. Emergency physicians encounter patients who have attempted suicide and are likely among the first medical providers to face the dilemma of honoring the patient’s DNR or intervening to reverse the effects of potentially fatal actions. We illustrate this issue by introducing a case example in which the DNR of a terminally (...)
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  39. Experimental Evidence Showing That Physician Guidance Promotes Perceptions of Physician Empathy.Daniel Russell Hans, Priyanka Dubé & Jason Adam Wasserman - 2016 - Ajob Empirical Bioethics 7 (3):135-139.
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  40. Assisted Suicide in Switzerland: Clarifying Liberties and Claims.Samia A. Hurst & Alex Mauron - 2016 - Bioethics 30 (9).
    Assisting suicide is legal in Switzerland if it is offered without selfish motive to a person with decision-making capacity. Although the ‘Swiss model’ for suicide assistance has been extensively described in the literature, the formally and informally protected liberties and claims of assistors and recipients of suicide assistance in Switzerland are incompletely captured in the literature. In this article, we describe the package of rights involved in the ‘Swiss model’ using the framework of Hohfeldian rights as modified by Wenar. After (...)
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  41. Die Rolle der Selbstbestimmung in der Rechtfertigung passiver und aktiver Sterbehilfe.Andreas Müller - 2016 - Jahrbuch für Wissenschaft Und Ethik 20 (1).
    Name der Zeitschrift: Jahrbuch für Wissenschaft und Ethik Jahrgang: 20 Heft: 1 Seiten: 5-28.
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  42. An Overview of the Proposed Victorian Recommendation for Assisted Dying and its Consequences.Frank O'Keeffe - 2016 - Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin 21 (4):3.
    O'Keeffe, Frank A recent report tabled in the Victorian Parliament has proposed that the Victorian Crimes Act 1958 be amended, allowing Victoria to become the only Australian state where euthanasia would be legal. Against this proposed legislation, this article contends the suggested amendments pose a threat to the fiduciary obligations that medical professionals owe to their patients. Moreover, that the parliamentary recommendation poses a considerable risk to the sick and dying, while creating tension within existing, currently overburdened, palliative care services. (...)
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  43. International Perspectives on Physician Assistance in Dying.David Orentlicher - 2016 - Hastings Center Report 46 (6):6-7.
    When the Supreme Court of Canada recognized a constitutional right to “medical assistance in dying” last year—and the nation's Parliament enacted legislation to implement the right earlier this year—Canadian lawmakers could look to two different models for guidance. The Netherlands and Belgium recognize a broad right to assistance in dying, while Oregon and elsewhere in the United States have a narrow right. In some ways, assistance in dying in Canada follows the Dutch-Belgian approach, while, in other ways, it seems more (...)
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  44. Canada on Course to Introduce Permissive Assisted Dying Regime.Udo Schuklenk - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (8):490-492.
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  45. Is Assisted Dying the Baby Boomers' Last Frontier?Udo Schuklenk - 2016 - Bioethics 30 (7):470-470.
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  46. Why Bioethics Needs a Disability Moral Psychology.Joseph A. Stramondo - 2016 - Hastings Center Report 46 (3):22-30.
    The deeply entrenched, sometimes heated conflict between the disability movement and the profession of bioethics is well known and well documented. Critiques of prenatal diagnosis and selective abortion are probably the most salient and most sophisticated of disability studies scholars’ engagements with bioethics, but there are many other topics over which disability activists and scholars have encountered the field of bioethics in an adversarial way, including health care rationing, growth-attenuation interventions, assisted reproduction technology, and physician-assisted suicide. -/- The tension between (...)
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  47. On the Moral Acceptability of Physician‐Assisted Dying for Non‐Autonomous Psychiatric Patients.Jukka Varelius - 2016 - Bioethics 30 (4):227-233.
    Several authors have recently suggested that the suffering caused by mental illness could provide moral grounds for physician-assisted dying. Yet they typically require that psychiatric-assisted dying could come to question in the cases of autonomous, or rational, psychiatric patients only. Given that also non-autonomous psychiatric patients can sometimes suffer unbearably, this limitation appears questionable. In this article, I maintain that restricting psychiatric-assisted dying to autonomous, or rational, psychiatric patients would not be compatible with endorsing certain end-of-life practices commonly accepted in (...)
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  48. Life’s Meaning and Late Life Rational Suicide.Jukka Varelius - 2016 - In Robert E. McCue & Meera Balasubramaniam (eds.), Rational Suicide in the Elderly. Springer. pp. 83-98.
    Suicidal ideation would often appear to relate to ideas about life’s meaninglessness. In this chapter, I consider the suicidal thoughts of an elderly person in light of the recent philosophical discussion on the meaning of life. I start by distinguishing between two importantly different questions about life’s meaning and explaining how they differ from certain other issues sometimes treated as questions about the meaning of life. Then I address the two questions about life’s meaning in turn, connecting them to the (...)
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  49. Physician-Assisted Dying and Two Senses of an Incurable Condition.Jukka Varelius - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (9):601-604.
    It is commonly accepted that voluntary active euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide can be allowed, if at all, only in the cases of patients whose conditions are incurable. Yet, there are different understandings of when a patient’s condition is incurable. In this article, I consider two understandings of the notion of an incurable condition that can be found in the recent debate on physician-assisted dying. According to one of them, a condition is incurable when it is known that there is no (...)
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  50. Active and Passive Physician‐Assisted Dying and the Terminal Disease Requirement.Jukka Varelius - 2016 - Bioethics 30 (9):663-671.
    The view that voluntary active euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide should be made available for terminal patients only is typically warranted by reference to the risks that the procedures are seen to involve. Though they would appear to involve similar risks, the commonly endorsed end-of-life practices referred to as passive euthanasia are available also for non-terminal patients. In this article, I assess whether there is good reason to believe that the risks in question would be bigger in the case of voluntary (...)
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  51. Nothing in this category. Everyone can categorize entries. Please help if you have the expertise.