Atomists

Edited by Monte Johnson (University of California, San Diego)
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  1. Meteorology.Monte Johnson - 2020 - In Liba Taub (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Greek and Roman Science. Cambridge, UK: pp. 160-184.
    Greco-Roman meteorology will be described in four overlapping developments. In the archaic period, astro-meteorological calendars were written down, and one appears in Hesiod’s Works and Days; such calendars or almanacs originated thousands of years earlier in Mesopotamia. In the second development, also in the archaic period, the pioneers of prose writing began writing speculative naturalistic explanations of meteorological phenomena: Anaximander, followed by Heraclitus, Anaxagoras, and others. When Aristotle in the fourth century BCE mentions the ‘inquiry that all our predecessors have (...)
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  2. The Ethical Maxims of Democritus of Abdera.Monte Johnson - 2020 - In David Wolfsdorf (ed.), Early Greek Ethics. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 211-242.
    Democritus of Abdera, best known as a cosmologist and the founder of atomism, wrote more on ethics than anyone before Plato. His work Peri euthumiê (On Contentment) was extremely influential on the later development of teleological and intellectualist ethics, eudaimonism, hedonism, therapeutic ethics, and positive psychology. The loss of his works, however, and the transmission of his fragments in collections of maxims (gnomai), has obscured the extent his contribution to the history of systematic ethics and influence on later philosophy, especially (...)
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  3. Why Did Aristotle Invent the Material Cause ? The Early Development of the Concept of Hê Hylê.Monte Ransome Johnson - 2020 - In Pierre Pellegrin & Françoise Graziani (eds.), L'HÉRITAGE D'ARISTOTE AUJOURD'HUI : NATURE ET SOCIÉTÉ. Alessandria: Editzioni dell'Orso. pp. 59-86.
    I present a developmental account of Aristotle’s concept of hê hylê (usually translated “the matter”), focused the earliest developments. I begin by analyzing fragments of some lost early works and a chapter of the Organon, texts which indicate that early in his career Aristotle had not yet begun to use he hylê in a technical sense. Next, I examine Physics II 3, a chapter in which Aristotle conceives of he hylê not as a kind of cause in its own right, (...)
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  4. Philosophy and Dietetics in the Hippocratic On Regimen: A Delicate Balance of Health. By Hynek Bartos. [REVIEW]Monte Ransome Johnson - 2020 - Ancient Philosophy 40 (1):221-227.
    Hynek Bartos does the field of ancient philosophy a great service by detailing the influence of early Greek thinkers (such as Heraclitus, Empedocles, Anaxagoras, Democritus, and Diogenes of Apollonia) on the Hippocratic work On Regimen, and by demonstrating that work’s innovative engagement with contemporary scientific and philosophical concepts as well as its direct influence on Plato and Aristotle. His study usefully counteracts the lamentable tendency among ancient philosophers to ignore or downplay the influence of medical literature on philosophy in general, (...)
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  5. Epicureans, Earlier Atomists, and Cyrenaics.Stefano Maso - 2020 - In Kelly Arenson (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Hellenistic Philosophy. New York, Stati Uniti: pp. 58-70.
    The theory developed by Leucippus (5th cent. BCE), Democritus (470/460-380 BCE), and later Epicurus (341-271/270 BCE) and his school is commonly defined as atomistic materialism. According to this theory, matter is the fundamental principle of existent and ever-evolving reality, and it is constituted of atoms. But whereas for the first atomists atoms were not so much a substance (ousia) as an ideal form (idea) through which they could explain sensible bodies and their movement, with Epicurus atoms effectively turned into a (...)
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  6. Anaxarchus on Indifference, Happiness, and Convention.Tim O'Keefe - 2020 - In David Wolfsdorf (ed.), Ancient Greek Ethics. Oxford University Press. pp. 680-699.
    Anaxarchus accompanied Pyrrho on Alexander the Great’s expedition to India and was known as “the Happy Man” because of his impassivity and contentment. Our sources on his philosophy are limited and largely consist of anecdotes about his interactions with Pyrrho and Alexander, but they allow us to reconstruct a distinctive ethical position. It overlaps with several disparate ethical traditions but is not merely a hodge-podge; it hangs together as a unified whole. Like Pyrrho, he asserts that things are indifferent in (...)
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  7. The Elementary Role of the So-Called Differences in the Atomism of Leucippus and Democritus.Gustavo Laet Gomes - 2019 - Prometheus 29:295-311.
  8. On Democritean Rhysmos.Gustavo Laet Gomes - 2019 - Archai: Revista de Estudos Sobre as Origens Do Pensamento Ocidental 27:e02702.
    In _Metaphysics_ A.4, Aristotle provides crucial information about fundamental aspects of the chemistry and microphysics of the atomic theory of Leucippus and Democritus of Abdera. Besides the plenum and the void, which he identifies as the elements of the atomic theory, he presents what he himself names as _differences_. These fundamental differences are named so because they ought to be responsible for the emergence of all other differences in the physical world, and especially the ones that hit our senses. Aristotle (...)
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  9. Aristotle on Kosmos and Kosmoi.Monte Johnson - 2019 - In Phillip Horky (ed.), Cosmos in the Ancient World. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. pp. 74-107.
    The concept of kosmos did not play the leading role in Aristotle’s physics that it did in Pythagorean, Atomistic, Platonic, or Stoic physics. Although Aristotle greatly influenced the history of cosmology, he does not himself recognize a science of cosmology, a science taking the kosmos itself as the object of study with its own phenomena to be explained and its own principles that explain them. The term kosmos played an important role in two aspects of his predecessor’s accounts that Aristotle (...)
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  10. A química atomista de leucipo e demócrito no tratado sobre a geração e a corrupção de Aristóteles.Gustavo Laet Gomes - 2018 - Dissertation, UFMG, Brazil
  11. Elementos no atomismo, segundo Aristóteles.Gustavo Laet Gomes - 2018 - Hypnos 41:146-165.
    In this paper, I discuss the use made by Aristotle of the term “element” when dealing with the atomist theory of Leucippus and Democritus. My goal is to verify which aspects of the atomist theory play the role of elements according to the definitions of Aristotle, who seems to have certain expectations regarding what can be designated as elements in the strict sense. One of them is the possibility of reciprocal transformation, the so-called “generation of elements”, which is the chemical (...)
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  12. O atomismo segundo Aristóteles: pluralismo ou monismo?Gustavo Laet Gomes - 2017 - Phaine: Revista de Estudos Sobre a Antigüidade 3 (2):56-79.
  13. Atomismo ético de Leucipo e Demócrito.João Emanuel Diogo - 2016 - Boletim de Estudos Clássicos 61 (61):67-84.
    In this article, we start from the general thesis of theatomism – everything in the universe is composed by atoms – toassume an atomist reading of the ethical fragments of Democritus.If Leucippus and Democritus explain not only the beginning of the world, as well as the constitution of the soul and the body from therelation atom-emptiness (to be-not to be), this structure will also beapplied to the ethical maxims that we know. Despite this, the relationsoul-body is one of superiority (the (...)
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  14. Conflicts of Atomisms. Some Major Differences Between Democritus and Colotes.Enrico Piergiacomi - 2016 - Elenchos 37 (1-2):147-180.
    The paper compares the thought of Democritus and that of Colotes. It is argued that the two thinkers diverge at least in three noteworthy respects: 1) they disagree about the nature of knowledge, for Democritus identifies it with a process which goes from raw sensation to intellectual understanding, whereas Colotes affirms the truth of every sensation and its fundamental role in the use of reason; 2) they have contrary opinions on the practice of “pleasing”, since the former totally rejects this (...)
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  15. Weight in Greek Atomism.Michael J. Augustin - 2015 - Philosophia 45 (1):76-99.
    The testimonia concerning weight in early Greek atomism appear to contradict one another. Some reports assert that the atoms do have weight, while others outright deny weight as a property of the atoms. A common solution to this apparent contradiction divides the testimonia into two groups. The first group describes the atoms within a κόσμος, where they have weight; the second group describes the atoms outside of a κόσμος, where they are weightless. A key testimonium for proponents of this solution (...)
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  16. Plutarch on the Geometry of the Elements.Jan2 Opsomer - 2015 - In Luc Van der Stockt & Michiel Meeusen (eds.), Aspects of Plutarch’s Natural Philosophy.
    Plutarch is committed to geometric atomism, the Platonic theory that derives the material elements from regular polyhedric shapes. An essential feature of this theory is that qualitative properties are not primitive, but supervene on more fundamental, quantitatively describable properties, such as the size, shape, mass or weight of the atoms, their solidity, position, arrangement and kinetic interactions. Plutarch recognises that the geometric account provides the causal explanation for phenomenal and other qualitative properties. He praises Plato and Democritus for their theoretical (...)
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  17. Democritus: Empirical Rationalist.Chris Christensen - 2014 - Philosophy Now 104:10-12.
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  18. Changing Our Minds: Democritus on What is Up to Us.Monte Johnson - 2014 - In Pierre Destrée, R. Salles & Marco Antonio De Zingano (eds.), Up to Us: Studies on Causality and Responsibility in Ancient Philosophy. Sankt Augustin: Academia Verlag. pp. 1-18.
    I develop a positive interpretation of Democritus' theory of agency and responsibility, building on previous studies that have already gone far in demonstrating his innovativeness and importance to the history and philosophy of these concepts. The interpretation will be defended by a synthesis of several familiar ethical fragments and maxims presented in the framework of an ancient problem that, unlike the problem of free will and determinism, Democritus almost certainly did confront: the problem of the causes of human goodness and (...)
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  19. Leucippus and Democritus on Like to Like and Ou Mallon.Gregory Andrew - 2013 - Apeiron 46 (4):1-23.
    Journal Name: Apeiron Issue: Ahead of print.
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  20. Did Perrin’s Experiments Convert Poincaré to Scientific Realism?Milena Ivanova - 2013 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 3 (1):1-19.
    In this paper I argue that Poincaré’s acceptance of the atom does not indicate a shift from instrumentalism to scientific realism. I examine the implications of Poincaré’s acceptance of the existence of the atom for our current understanding of his philosophy of science. Specifically, how can we understand Poincaré’s acceptance of the atom in structural realist terms? I examine his 1912 paper carefully and suggest that it does not entail scientific realism in the sense of acceptance of the fundamental existence (...)
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  21. Nature, Spontaneity, and Voluntary Action in Lucretius.Monte Ransome Johnson - 2013 - In Daryn Lehoux, A. D. Morrison & Alison Sharrock (eds.), Lucretius: Poetry, Philosophy, Science. Oxford University Press.
    In twenty important passages located throughout De rerum natura, Lucretius refers to natural things happening spontaneously (sponte sua; the Greek term is automaton). The most important of these uses include his discussion of the causes of: nature, matter, and the cosmos in general; the generation and adaptation of plants and animals; the formation of images and thoughts; and the behavior of human beings and the development of human culture. In this paper I examine the way spontaneity functions as a cause (...)
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  22. The Scientist's Atom and the Philosopher's Stone: How Science Succeeded and Philosophy Failed to Gain Knowledge of Atoms. [REVIEW]Victor Boantza - 2012 - Isis 103:217-218.
  23. Concepts of Fascination, From Democritus to Kant.Andreas Degen - 2012 - Journal of the History of Ideas 73 (3):371-393.
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  24. Epicureanism by Tim O'Keefe. [REVIEW]Monte Johnson - 2012 - Aestimatio 9:108.
  25. O visível e o inteligível. Estudos sobre a percepção e o pensamento na Filosofia Grega Antiga.Miriam Campolina Diniz Peixoto, Marcelo Pimenta Marques, Fernando Rey Puente, M. C. D. Peixoto, M. P. Marques & F. R. Puente - 2012
    This book collects texts from three specialists in ancient philosophy which deal with the question of perceptive and intellective knowledge in antiquity. They try to present, in their different analyzes, the complex interrelationship among perception and thought in ancient authors, like Heraclitus, Parmenides, Democritus, Plato and Aristotle. The purpose of the texts is to expose the visible field - the perceptual knowledge domain - interacts with the invisible - the domain of reason and thought. In other words, that among them (...)
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  26. Democritus' Ophthalmology.Kelli Rudolph - 2012 - Classical Quarterly 62 (2):496-501.
    The poiintt of Democritus' physiology of the eye is that vision occurs because the eye allows the image in, and its sponginess aids the transmission of the image to the reasoning faculty. Thus,, Democritus' ophthalmology plays an important, though neglected, part in his theory of vision.
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  27. Il Mistero Democrito.Giuseppe Solaro - 2012 - Aracne.
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  28. Democritus (C. 460 - C. 370 BCE).Monte Johnson - 2011 - Classical and Medieval Literature Criticism 136:257-259.
    Encyclopedia article on Democritus. Includes a brief overview of his philosophical views, major works, and critical reception.
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  29. The Distinction Between Primary and Secondary Qualities in Ancient Greek Philosophy.Mi-Kyoung Lee - 2011 - In Lawrence Nolan (ed.), Primary and Secondary Qualities: The Historical and Ongoing Debate. Oxford University Press. pp. 15.
  30. L’activité de l’'me démocritéenne.Miriam C. D. Peixoto - 2011 - Chôra 9:217-242.
    The thought of the ancient atomists about the activity of the soul in the body is an important chapter in the history of reflection on the soul in ancient philosophy. A review of testimonies and fragments attributed to Democritus of Abdera shows its singular conception of the soul as a complex network of transactions through which it exercises, inside compound bodies, its role in driving principle of beings animated. These texts show the tension and dynamism that characterize the activity of (...)
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  31. Democritus' Perspectival Theory of Vision.Kelli Rudolph - 2011 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 131:67-83.
    Democritus' theory of vision combines the notions of images () streaming from objects and air imprints, which gives him the resources to account for the perception of the relative size and distance of objects, not just their characteristics. This perspectival explanation of the visual theory accommodates important but overlooked evidence from Vitruvius. By comparing Democritus' theory with ancient developments in visual representation, my analysis provides a new approach to the evidence of atomist vision. I begin with the process of vision (...)
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  32. (W.) Leszl I primi atomisti: raccolta di testi che riguardano Leucippo e Democrito. Florence: L.S. Olschki, 2009. Pp. 449, CDROM. €55. 9788822258519. [REVIEW]Kelli Rudolph - 2011 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 131:264-265.
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  33. Ancient Self-Refutation: The Logic and History of the Self-Refutation Argument From Democritus to Augustine.Luca Castagnoli - 2010 - Cambridge University Press.
    A 'self-refutation argument' is any argument which aims at showing that a certain thesis is self-refuting. This study was the first book-length treatment of ancient self-refutation and provides a unified account of what is distinctive in the ancient approach to the self-refutation argument, on the basis of close philological, logical and historical analysis of a variety of sources. It examines the logic, force and prospects of this original style of argumentation within the context of ancient philosophical debates, dispelling various misconceptions (...)
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  34. Mi-Kyoung Lee's Epistemology After Protagoras: Responses to Relativism in Plato, Aristotle, and Democritus.Timothy Chappell - 2010 - Philosophical Books 51 (2):117-125.
  35. Rhusmos E Movimento Dos Átomos Na Física de Demócrito.Miriam Campolina Diniz Peixoto - 2010 - Kriterion: Journal of Philosophy 51 (122):413-428.
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  36. Democrito E L’Accademia. Studi Sulla Trasmissione Dell’Atomismo Antico da Aristotele a Simplicio. [REVIEW]Lorenzo Perilli - 2010 - Ancient Philosophy 30 (2):412-415.
  37. Spontaneity, Democritean Causality and Freedom.Monte Ransome Johnson - 2009 - Elenchos 30 (1):5-52.
    Critics have alleged that Democritus’ ethical prescriptions (“gnomai”) are incompatible with his physics, since his atomism seems committed to necessity or chance (or an awkward combination of both) as a universal cause of everything, leaving no room for personal responsibility. I argue that Democritus’ critics, both ancient and contemporary, have misunderstood a fundamental concept of his causality: a cause called “spontaneity”, which Democritus evidently considered a necessary (not chance) cause, compatible with human freedom, of both atomic motion and human actions. (...)
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  38. The Significance of "Chymical Atomism".William Newman - 2009 - Early Science and Medicine 14 (1-3):248-264.
    The historical treatment of atomism and the mechanical philosophy largely neglects what I call "chymical atomism," namely a type of pre-Daltonian corpuscular matter theory that postulated particles of matter which were operationally indivisible. From the Middle Ages onwards, alchemists influenced by Aristotle's Meteorology, De caelo, and De generatione et corruptione argued for the existence of robust corpuscles of matter that resisted analysis by laboratory means. As I argue in the present paper, this alchemical tradition entered the works of Daniel Sennert (...)
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  39. Parmenides and the History of Dialectic: Three Essays. By Scott Austin: Book Reviews. [REVIEW]Robin Waterfield - 2009 - Heythrop Journal 50 (4):698-698.
  40. Democritus.Sylvia Berryman - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  41. Leucippus.Sylvia Berryman - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  42. Review of Aldo Brancacci, Pierre-Marie Morel (Eds.), Democritus: Science, the Arts, and the Care of the Soul[REVIEW]Patricia Curd - 2008 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (12).
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  43. Gnomica Democritea: Studien Zur Gnomologischen Überlieferung der Ethik Demokrits Und Zum Corpus Parisinum Mit Einer Edition der Democritea des Corpus Parisinum.Jens Gerlach - 2008 - L. Reichert.
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  44. Leucippus's Atomism.Daniel W. Graham - 2008 - In Patricia Curd & Daniel W. Graham (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Presocratic Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    The founder of atomic theory, according to Aristotle and Theophrastus, is Leucippus. His very existence has been called into question. Three of the best minds of nineteenth-century scholarship were embroiled in a vehement debate on this question, which thereupon became a cause célèbre, with scholars weighing in on both sides for the next half century. Ultimately this debate seems to have ended in stalemate and exhaustion rather than in any clear-cut decision. After briefly reviewing the debate, this article argues that (...)
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  45. Creationism and its Critics in Antiquity.David Sedley - 2008 - University of California Press.
    In this book, David Sedley examines this question and illuminates new historical perspectives on the pantheon of thinkers who laid the foundations of Western ...
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  46. Democritus: Science, The Arts, and the Care of the Soul. Proceedings of the International Colloquium on Democritus (Paris, 18–20 September 2003). [REVIEW]Karel Thein - 2008 - Rhizai. A Journal for Ancient Philosophy and Science 5:165-181.
    Review of Democritus: Science, The Arts, and the Care of the Soul. Proceedings of the International Colloquium on Democritus . Philosophia Antiqua. A Series of Studies on Ancient Philosophy, vol. 102., Edited by Aldo Brancacci and Pierre-Marie Morel, Brill, Leiden and Boston, 2007.
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  47. Democritus: Science, the Arts, and the Care of the Soul. Edited by Aldo Brancacci and Pierre-Marie Morel: Book Reviews. [REVIEW]Robin Waterfield - 2008 - Heythrop Journal 49 (4):675-677.
  48. Democritus: Science, the Arts, and the Care of the Soul: Proceedings of the International Colloquium on Democritus, Paris, 18-20 September 2003. [REVIEW]Aldo Brancacci & Pierre-Marie Morel (eds.) - 2007 - Brill.
    Printbegrænsninger: Der kan printes 10 sider ad gangen og max. 40 sider pr. session.
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  49. Epistemology After Protagoras.Luca Castagnoli - 2007 - Ancient Philosophy 27 (2):405 - 418.
  50. Democritus: Science, the Arts, and the Care of the Soul. [REVIEW]Francesco Fronterotta - 2007 - Elenchos 28 (2):447-453.
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