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  1. Responses to Violence and Trauma: The Case of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.Gwen Adshead, Annie Bartlett & Gillian Mezey - 2009 - In Annie Bartlett & Gillian McGauley (eds.), Forensic Mental Health: Concepts, Systems, and Practice. Oxford University Press. pp. 113.
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  2. Personal Identity and Memory Transfer.Karl Ameriks - 1976 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 14 (4):385-391.
  3. Memory, Identity, and Cultural Authority.Sharon Anderson-Gold - 2005 - Social Philosophy Today 21:249-252.
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  4. The Eros of Memory.Rafael Argullol - 2004 - Diogenes 51 (1):49-53.
    The author considers the tension and contradiction between memory and consciousness. Memory brings to the surface the critical peaks of our lives and weaves them into the present, but in a seemingly arbitrary way that the author describes as the ‘instinct of consciousness’; memory constructs a secret story, a personal ‘golden age’, of our lives that diverges from the official story we try to legitimize, not only to the external world but also in our own personal world. This secret story (...)
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  5. Memory's Execution : (Dis)Placing the Dissident Body.Bernard J. Armada - 2010 - In Greg Dickinson, Carole Blair & Brian L. Ott (eds.), Places of Public Memory: The Rhetoric of Museums and Memorials. University of Alabama Press.
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  6. Ascensão da autobiografia: declínio do sujeito.Myriam Ávila - 2006 - Kriterion: Journal of Philosophy 47 (114):439-442.
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  7. What is Autobiographical Memory.Alan D. Baddeley - 1992 - In Martin A. Conway, David C. Rubin, H. Spinnler & W. Wagenaar (eds.), Theoretical Perspectives on Autobiographical Memory. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 65--13.
    Over 100 years ago, Frances Galton began the empirical study of autobiographical memory by devising a technique in which he explored the capacity for a cue word to elicit the recollection of events from earlier life (Galton, 1883). After a century of neglect, the topic began to re-emerge, stimulated by the work of Robinson (1976) using the technique on groups of normal subjects, by Crovitz’s work on its application to patients with memory deficits (Crovitz & Schiffman, 1974), and by the (...)
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  8. Memory, Forgetfulness and the Disclosure of Being in Heidegger and Plotinus.Eugene F. Bales - 1990 - Philosophy Today 34 (2):141-151.
  9. The Recovered Memory/False Memory Debate.William P. Banks & Kathy Pezdek - 1994 - Consciousness and Cognition 3 (3-4):265-268.
  10. Autobiographical Remembering: Narrative Constraints on Objectified Selves.Craig R. Barclay - 1996 - In David C. Rubin (ed.), Remembering Our Past: Studies in Autobiographical Memory. Cambridge University Press. pp. 94--125.
    The general purposes of this essay are as follows: First, to outline an ecological model of autobiographical remembering by examining the purposes, processes, and products of reconstructing meaningful memories. Second, to argue that autobiographical remembering is embedded in affective, interpersonal, sociocultural, and historical contexts. Improvised selves are created in present contexts to serve psychosocial, cultural, and historical purposes, and third, to demonstrate essential constraints on the construction of coherent personal narratives that give meaning and purpose to our everyday lives. -/- (...)
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  11. Autobiographical Remembering: Creating Personal Culture.Craig R. Barclay & Thomas S. Smith - 1992 - In Martin A. Conway, David C. Rubin, H. Spinnler & W. Wagenaar (eds.), Theoretical Perspectives on Autobiographical Memory. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 75--97.
    A model of autobiographical remembering and the creation of personal culture is proposed. In this model we hypothesize that autobiographical memories are instantiations--objectifications as in metaphors or idioms-constituted through reconstructive processes that come to be recognized as self. Such memories are subsequently subjectified as personal culture. Our emphasis is on the functions and uses of autobiographical remembering, especially in interaction with others, where reconstructed memories are marked with affective significance. We propose that memories become autobiographical as a function of how (...)
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  12. Depression, Implicit Memory, and Self: A Revised Memory Model of Emotion.Elaine S. Barry, Mary J. Naus & Lynn P. Rehm - 2006 - Clinical Psychology Review 26:719-745.
    Cognitive constructs are explored for clinical psychologists interested in cognitive phenomena in depression. Both traditional and modern memory constructs are outlined and described with attention to their contribution to understanding depression. In particular, the notions of memory construction, self-schemas, and autobiographical memory (per [Conway, M.A. (2001). Sensory–perceptual episodic memory and its context: Autobiographical memory. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London: Biological Sciences, 356, 1375–1384.]) are discussed. Then, the phenomenon of implicit memory is described as a way to bring (...)
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  13. Hirsch, Sebald, and the Uses and Limits of Postmemory.Kathy Behrendt - 2013 - In Russell J. A. Kilbourn & Eleanor Ty (eds.), The Memory Effect: The Remediation of Memory in Literature and Film. Wilfrid Laurier University Press. pp. 51-67.
    Marianne Hirsch’s influential concept of postmemory articulates the ethical significance of representing trauma in art and literature. Postmemory, for Hirsch, “describes the relationship of children of survivors of cultural or collective trauma to the experiences of their parents, experiences that they ‘remember’ only as the narratives and images with which they grew up, but that are so powerful, so monumental, as to constitute memories in their own right”. Through appeal to recent philosophical work on memory, the ethics of remembering, and (...)
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  14. Scraping Down the Past: Memory and Amnesia in W. G. Sebald's Anti-Narrative.Kathy Behrendt - 2010 - Philosophy and Literature 34 (2):394-408.
    Vanguard anti-narrativist Galen Strawson declares personal memory unimportant for self-constitution. But what if lapses of personal memory are sustained by a morally reprehensible amnesia about historical events, as happens in the work of W.G. Sebald? The importance of memory cannot be downplayed in such cases. Nevertheless, contrary to expectations, a concern for memory needn’t ally one with the narrativist position. Recovery of historical and personal memory results in self-dissolution and not self-unity or understanding in Sebald’s characters. In the end, Sebald (...)
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  15. Immunity to Error Through Misidentification and Past-Tense Memory Judgements.J. L. Bermudez - 2013 - Analysis 73 (2):211-220.
    Autobiographical memories typically give rise either to memory reports (“I remember going swimming”) or to first person past-tense judgements (“I went swimming”). This article focuses on first person past-tense judgements that are (epistemically) based on autobiographical memories. Some of these judgements have the IEM property of being immune to error through misidentification. This article offers an account of when and why first person past-tense judgements have the IEM property.
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  16. Memory Judgments and Immunity to Error Through Misidentification.Jose Luis Bermudez - 2012 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 84 (1):123-142.
    First person judgments that are immune to error through misidentifi cation (IEM) are fundamental to self-conscious thought. The IEM status of many such judgments can be understood in terms of the possession conditions of the concepts they involve. However, this approach cannot be extended to first person judgments based on autobiographical memory. Th e paper develops an account of why such judgments have the IEM property and how thinkers are able to exploit this fact in inference.
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  17. Further Thoughts on Memory: Replies to Schechtman, Adams, and Goldberg.Sven Bernecker - 2011 - Philosophical Studies 153 (1):109-121.
    This is a response to three critical discussions of my book Memory: A Philosophical Study (Oxford University Press 2010): Marya Schechtman, Memory and Identity , Fred Adams, Husker Du? , and Sanford Goldberg The Metasemantics of Memory.
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  18. Women's Biographies and Women's Memory of War.Olga N. Nikitina-den Besten, Elena Rozhdestvenskaya & Victoria Semenova - unknown
    This article is the English-language pre-print version of the chapter published in "Hitlers Sklaven" (in German). The volume "Hitlers Sklaven" (2008) is a result of a massive international oral history project aimed to study forced and slave labour for the Nazi regime during World War II. Within this volume, our article focuses specifically on the experiences of Russian women - former slave labourers. Biographical interviews with these now elderly women were carried out in 2005 in Pskov. The Russian region of (...)
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  19. Memory and Punishment.Christopher Birch - 2000 - Criminal Justice Ethics 19 (2):17-31.
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  20. The Moral Demands of Memory.Jeffrey Blustein - 2008 - Cambridge University Press.
    Despite an explosion of studies on memory in historical and cultural studies, there is relatively little in moral philosophy on this subject. In this book, Jeffrey Blustein provides a systematic and philosophically rigorous account of a morality of memory. Drawing on a broad range of philosophical and humanistic literatures, he offers a novel examination of memory and our relations to people and events from our past, the ways in which memory is preserved and transmitted, and the moral responsibilities associated with (...)
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  21. On Taking Responsibility for One’s Past.Jeffrey Blustein - 2000 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 17 (1):1–19.
  22. Choosing for Others as Continuing a Life Story: The Problem of Personal Identity Revisited.Jeffrey Blustein - 1999 - Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 27 (1):20-31.
  23. Farewell to the Past: Historical Memory, Oblivion and Collective Identity.R. Bodei - 1992 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 18 (3-4):251-265.
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  24. Memory and Morals in Memento : Hume at the Movies.George Bragues - 2008 - Film-Philosophy 12 (2):62-82.
    It is a common lament that people, the young especially, are increasingly shyingaway from books and instead turning for intellectual sustenance to video games, film, andtelevision - that is, images are displacing words, with the result that the culture isbecoming less tolerant of cognitive complexity .1Instead of vainly tryingto reform, or negate the influence of, popular entertainments, it might be better toembrace them, making selective use of them to cultivate an interest in philosophic topicsamong young minds. Perhaps we can lead (...)
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  25. Philosophy in Autobiographical Sketches.Henry Walter Brann - 1976 - Philosophy and History 9 (1):42-47.
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  26. Make My Memory: How Advertising Can Change Our Memories of the Past.Kathryn A. Braun, Rhiannon Ellis & Elizabeth F. Loftus - 2002 - Psychology and Marketing 19 (1):1-23.
    Marketers use autobiographical advertising as a means to create nostalgia for their products. This research explores whether such referencing can cause people to believe that they had experiences as children that are mentioned in the ads. In Experiment 1, participants viewed an ad for Disney that suggested that they shook hands with Mickey Mouse as a child. Relative to controls, the ad increased their confidence that they personally had shaken hands with Mickey as a child at a Disney resort. The (...)
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  27. The Nature and Significance of Memory Disturbance in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.Chris R. Brewin - 2011 - Annual Review of Clinical Psychology 7.
    Disturbances in aspects of memory described in current learning and cognitive theories are much more strongly associated with the presence of psychiatric disorder than with mere exposure to traumatic events. In posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), there are numerous associated changes that involve memory capacity, the content of memories for trauma, and a variety of memory processes. Whereas some changes appear to reflect the effects of the disorder, other evidence supports a predictive or causal role for memory disturbance. The following aspects (...)
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  28. Memory, Quasi-Memory, and Pseudo-Quasi-Memory.Christopher Buford - 2009 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 87 (3):465 – 478.
    Bishop Butler objected to Locke's theory of personal identity on the grounds that memory presupposes personal identity. Most of those sympathetic with Locke's account have accepted Butler's criticism, and have sought to devise a theory of personal identity in the spirit of Locke's that avoids Butler's circularity objection. John McDowell has argued that even the more recent accounts of personal identity are vulnerable to the kind of objection Butler raised against Locke's own account. I criticize McDowell's stance, drawing on a (...)
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  29. Memory and Persons.Tyler Burge - 2003 - Philosophical Review 112 (3):289-337.
  30. Coping with Traumatic Memories: Second World War Veterans' Experiences of Social Support in Relation to the Narrative Coherence of War Memories.Karen J. Burnell, Peter G. Coleman & Nigel Hunt - unknown
    This paper reports a qualitative study that used narrative analysis to explore how social support helps many armed-services veterans cope with traumatic memories. The analysis was carried out on two levels, that of narrative form, argued to be indicative of reconciliation, and narrative content, which allowed exploration of the types of social support experienced by veterans with coherent, reconciled and incoherent narratives. Ten British male Second World War veterans were interviewed regarding their war experiences, presence of traumatic memories, and experiences (...)
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  31. From PSDA to PTSD: The Patient Self-Determination Act and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.H. J. Bursztajn - 1993 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 4 (1):71.
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  32. Our Faithfulness to the Past: Reconstructing Memory Value.Sue Campbell - 2006 - Philosophical Psychology 19 (3):361 – 380.
    The reconstructive turn in memory theory challenges us to provide an account of successful remembering that is attentive to the ways in which we use memory, both individually and socially. I investigate conceptualizations of accuracy and integrity useful to memory theorists and argue that faithful recollection is often a complex epistemological/ethical achievement.
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  33. Women,?False? Memory, and Personal Identity.Sue Campbell - 1997 - Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy 12 (2):51-82.
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  34. Women, "False" Memory, and Personal Identity.Sue Campbell - 1997 - Hypatia 12 (2):51 - 82.
    We contest each other's memory claims all the time. I am concerned with how the contesting of memory claims and narratives may be an integral part of many abusive situations. I use the writings of Otto Weininger and the False Memory Syndrome Foundation to explore a particular strategy of discrediting women as rememberers, making them more vulnerable to sexual harm. This strategy relies on the presentation of women as unable to maintain a stable enough sense of self or identity to (...)
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  35. Repeatedly Thinking About a Non-Event: Source Misattributions Among Preschoolers.Stephen J. Ceci, Mary Lyndia Crotteau Huffman, Elliott Smith & Elizabeth F. Loftus - 1994 - Consciousness and Cognition 3 (3-4):388-407.
    In this paper we review the factors alleged to be responsible for the creation of inaccurate reports among preschool-aged children, focusing on so-called "source misattribution errors." We present the first round of results from an ongoing program of research that suggests that source misattributions could be a powerful mechanism underlying children′s false beliefs about having experienced fictitious events. Preliminary findings from this program of research indicate that all children of all ages are equally susceptible to making source misattributions. Data from (...)
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  36. My Autobiographical Account at Thirty.Liang Ch'I.-ch'ao - 1977 - Chinese Studies in History 10 (3):4-34.
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  37. Junk Skepticism and Recovered Memory: A Reply to Piper.Ross E. Cheit - 1999 - Ethics and Behavior 9 (4):295-318.
  38. Consider This, Skeptics of Recovered Memory.Ross E. Cheit - 1998 - Ethics and Behavior 8 (2):141 – 160.
    Some self-proclaimed skeptics of recovered memory claim that traumatic childhood events simply cannot be forgotten at the time only to be remembered later in life. This claim has been made repeatedly by the Advisory Board members of a prominent advocacy group for parents accused of sexual abuse, the so-called False Memory Syndrome Foundation. The research project described in this article identifies and documents the growing number of cases that have been ignored or distorted by such skeptics. To date, this project (...)
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  39. Some Characteristics of People’s Traumatic Memories.Sven-Åke Christianson & Elizabeth F. Loftus - 1990 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 28 (3):195-198.
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  40. Why Search for Lost Time: Memory, Autonomy, and Practical Reason.John Christman - 2008 - In Catriona Mackenzie & Kim Atkins (eds.), Practical Identity and Narrative Agency. Routledge.
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  41. The Procedural Organization Of Emotions: A Contribution From Cognitive Science To The.Robert Clyman - 1991 - Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association 39.
    Recent research in cognitive science has demonstrated that there are differe nt types of memory processes. While declarative memory refers to memories for facts or events which can be recalled, procedural memories underlie skills yet encode information which cannot be recalled. This paper extends this distinction to the nature of emotions and emotional memories. Its implications for psychoanalytic theory are then examined, yielding fresh views of transference, defense, and treatment. Infantile amnesia is found to result partially from the immaturity of (...)
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  42. Personal Identity and the Coherence of Q-Memory.Arthur W. Collins - 1997 - Philosophical Quarterly 47 (186):73-80.
    Brian Garrett constructs cases satisfying Andy Hamilton’s definition of weak q‐memory. This does not establish that a peculiar kind of memory is at least conceptually coherent. Any ‘apparent memory experiences’ that satisfy the definition turn out not to involve remembering anything at all. This conclusion follows if we accept, as both Hamilton and Garrett do, a variety of first‐person authority according to which memory judgements may be false, but not on the ground that someone other than the remembering subject had (...)
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  43. Memory and Trauma: Examining Disruptions in Implicit, Explicit and Autobiographical Memory.Melody D. Combs & Anne P. DePrince - 2010 - In Ruth A. Lanius, Eric Vermetten & Clare Pain (eds.), The Impact of Early Life Trauma on Health and Disease. Cambridge University Press.
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  44. A Structural Model of Autobiographical Memory.Martin A. Conway - 1992 - In Martin A. Conway, David C. Rubin, H. Spinnler & W. Wagenaar (eds.), Theoretical Perspectives on Autobiographical Memory. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 167--193.
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  45. The Construction of Autobiographical Memories in the Self-Memory System.Martin A. Conway & Christopher W. Pleydell-Pearce - 2000 - Psychological Review 107 (2):261-288.
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  46. Reid on Memory and Personal Identity.Rebecca Copenhaver - 2009 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  47. The Memory Wars.Frederick Crews - 1995 - New York Review.
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  48. Memory, Identity, Community: The Idea of Narrative in the Human Sciences (Review). [REVIEW]Sharon Crowley - 2000 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 33 (2):187-191.
  49. Personal Narratives and Cosmopolitan Identities: An Autobiographical Approach.Maria Daskalaki - unknown
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  50. Repression and the Inaccessibility of Emotional Memories.Penelope J. Davis - 1990 - In Jerome L. Singer (ed.), Repression and Dissociation. University of Chicago Press. pp. 387--403.
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