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  1. Suhrawardi's Innovations Concerning the Theory of "Emanation".Dr S. Juma - unknown - Kheradnameh Sadra Quarterly 22.
    There are a number of people in Islamic communities, including ours, who have a superficial judgment of current philosophical discussions in the world of Islam and consider them as having been originated from Greek philosophy. One of these discussions is related to the issue of emanation or effusion with which Farabi and Ibn Sina agreed. Unfortunately, in spite of all the innovations brought about by these two philosophers concerning the above issue, a great number of teachers of philosophy agree with (...)
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  2. Ibn Sina's Treatise of "Al-Majalis Al-Sab'ah".Maqsud Mohammadi - unknown - Kheradnameh Sadra Quarterly 27.
    This article introduces one of Ibn-Sina's unpublished and handwritten manuscripts called "al-majalis al-saba'h". This treatise consists of fourty one questions and answers between Abulhasan Amiri and Ibn-Sina . The writer has extensively explored the content validity of this work and presented a rather comprehensive analysis of it.
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  3. A Glance At The Impacts Of Islamic Philosophy On Scholasticism.Ali Muradkhani - unknown - Kheradnameh Sadra Quarterly 40.
    The Present paper, in addition to discussing the indebtedness of Scholastic philosophy to Islamic thought in the 12th and 13th centuries, provides a short account of Ibn Sina and Ibn Rushd's metaphysics along with their influence over the medieval philosophy. When discussing Ibn Sina, the author explicitly emphasizes his originality of thoughts with reference to his philosophical sources, such as Aristotle, neo-Platonists, Kindi, and Farabi. The author believes that this originality lies in Ibn Sina's discussions of existence, the relation of (...)
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  4. Oriental Wisdom.M. Pour - unknown - Kheradnameh Sadra Quarterly 28.
    Some people consider Ibn-Sina a Peripatetic philosopher and merely a comentator of Aristotle's works.However even a facile study of the works of this eminent philosopher reveals that this is absolutely wrong.In fact, the differences between Ibn-Sina's theories and those of Aristotle are so great in number that we cannot even enumerate them in this paper.Nevertheless, it seems that towards the end of his short life, Ibn-Sina intended to found a new philosophical system, called "Oriental Wisdom" , but he couldn't achieve (...)
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  5. Theology in Avicennan Philosophy.Amir Shirzad - unknown - Kheradnameh Sadra Quarterly 12.
    Peripatetics use the terms "necessary existent" and "first principle" to define God on the basis of dividing existents into necessary and possible. They also state that the chain of the possible existents leads up to a non-caused cause. According to Peripatetics, there is no way to learn about the nature of God and the most which can be done is to perceive God via terms such as "necessary existent" and "first principle".Still, they emphasize, that this very perception cannot and should (...)
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  6. Augustine and Avicenna on the Puzzle of Time Without Time.Celia Hatherly - forthcoming - In Sean Hannan, John Doody & Kim Paffenroth (eds.), Augustine and Time. Rowan and Littlefield.
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  7. El Sirr Sina'at Al-Tibb de Abu Bakr Muhammad B. Zakariyya Al-RazT.Rosa Kuhne - forthcoming - Al-Qantara.
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  8. Illuminationist School and Critique of Avicenna’s Karársīs Fi ‘L-Hikmah.Farshad Norouzi - forthcoming - New Philosophy.
    Shahāb ad-Dīn" Yahya ibn Habash ibn Amirak as-Suhrawardī, (also Shaikh al-Ishraq, Shaikh al-Maqtul) was founder of the illuminationist school (Ar. Hikmat al-ishraq; Pers. falsafaye ešrāqi ). Derived from “illumination,” a conventional translation of the Arabic term ishraq (lit. radiance, shining of the rising sun), “illuminationism” refers to the doctrine of the Ishraqiyyun, a school of philosophical and mystical thought of various Graeco-Oriental roots whose principles were propounded as an ancient “science of lights” (‘ilm al-anwar) . He chose this title to (...)
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  9. God's Perfect Will: Remarks on Johnston and O'Connor.Kenneth L. Pearce - forthcoming - Oxford Studies in Philosophy of Religion.
    Why would God create a world at all? Further, why would God create a world like this one? The Neoplatonic framework of classical philosophical theology answers that God’s willing is an affirmation of God’s own goodness, and God creates to show forth God’s glory. Mark Johnston has recently argued that, in addition to explaining why God would create at all, this framework gives extremely wide scope to divine freedom. Timothy O’Connor objects that divine freedom, on this view, cannot be so (...)
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  10. Self-Awareness in Islamic Philosophy: Avicenna and Beyond by Jari Kaukua.Jim Slagle - forthcoming - Journal of Islamic Studies:etw008.
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  11. Neither Created Nor Destructible: Ibn Sīnā on the Eternity of the Universe.Syamsuddin Arif - 2020 - Al-Shajarah 25 (1):85-106.
    This article discusses Ibn Sīnā’s reasons for upholding the eternity of the world in his major philosophical writings and the ensuing heated debate between his detractors (al-Ghazālī, al-Shahrastānī and al-Rāzī) and supporters (al-Ṭūsī and al-Āmidī). I argue that notwithstanding the responses and surrejoinders it had elicited, Ibn Sīnā’s position on the issue is indeed coherent and irrefutable, since he distinguishes three modes of eternity, corresponding to the hierarchy of beings which he introduced, namely, (i) absolutely eternal (by virtue of itself); (...)
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  12. Necessary Existence and the Doctrine of Being in Avicenna's Metaphysics of the Healing.Daniel D. De Haan - 2020 - Brill.
    In Necessary Existence and the Doctrine of Being in Avicenna’s Metaphysics of the Healing Daniel De Haan explicates the central argument of Avicenna’s metaphysical masterpiece. De Haan argues that the most fundamental primary notion in Avicenna’s metaphysics is neither being nor thing but is the necessary ( wājib), which Avicenna employs to demonstrate the existence and true-nature of the divine necessary existence in itself. This conclusion is established through a systematic investigation of how Avicenna’s theory of a demonstrative science is (...)
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  13. Avicenna’s and Mullā Ṣadrā’s Arguments for Immateriality of the Soul From the Viewpoint of Physicalism.Mahdi Homazadeh - 2020 - Angelicum 97 (3):367-390.
    I seek to explicate the ways in which the soul is deemed immaterial in two main strands of Islamic philosophy, and then consider some arguments for the immateriality of the soul. To do so, I first overview Avicenna’s theory of the spiritual incipience (al-ḥudūth al-rūḥānī) of the soul and his version of substance dualism. I will then discuss Mullā Ṣadrā’s view of the physical incipience (al-ḥudūth al-jismānī) of the soul and how the soul emerges and develops towards immateriality on his (...)
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  14. From Food to Elements and Humors: Digestion in Late Renaissance Galenism.Elisabeth Moreau - 2020 - In Giouli Korobili & Roberto Lo Presti (eds.), Nutrition and Nutritive Soul in Aristotle and Aristotelianism. De Gruyter. pp. 319-338.
    In late Renaissance medicine, the example of digestion was frequently invoked to prove the elemental composition of the human body. Food was considered as being decomposed in its first elements by the stomach, and digested into a thick juice, which was assimilated by the liver and the body parts. Such a process points to the structure of the human body into four elements that are transformed into different types of humors during several stages of “concoction”. This chapter examines the Galenic (...)
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  15. Scientific Method in Avicenna: Subject, Principle And Problem.Ömer Odabaş - 2020 - Theosophia (1):15-33.
    In this article, three concepts that constitute the pillars of sciences, namely the subject, principle and problem, will be examined relying on Avicenna’s (d. 428/1037) book of Burhān. These three concepts, which generally determine the scope of scientific research and the principles on which it should be based, were introduced systematically for the first time by Aristotle (d. 322 BC) in the history of thought. Through these concepts, philosophical sciences could be distinguished from one another and it became possible for (...)
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  16. Avicena e suas fontes: o De anima II.1 412a19-30.Meline Costa Souza - 2020 - Nuntius Antiquus 16 (1):101-126.
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  17. The Role of Essentially Ordered Causal Series in Avicenna’s Proof for the Necessary Existent in the Metaphysics of the Salvation.Celia Byrne - 2019 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 36 (2):121-138.
    Avicenna's proof for the existence of God (the Necessary Existent) in the Metaphysics of the Salvation relies on the claim that every possible existent shares a common cause. I argue that Avicenna has good reason to hold this claim given that he thinks that (1) every essentially ordered causal series originates in a first, common cause and that (2) every possible existent belongs to an essentially ordered series. Showing Avicenna's commitment to 1 and 2 allows me to respond to Herbert (...)
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  18. Experimentation in Avicenna's Philosophy by Referring to Its Practical Application in His Works on Natural Sciences.Roohollah Fadaei & Reza Akbari - 2019 - Philosophy and Kalam 51 (2):245ß260.
    Avicenna, beside his theoretical discussions about experimentation, practically applied his experimental method to natural sciences studies such as medicine, biology, and meteorology. His theoretical discussions subsume propositions concerning the conditions under which experimental knowledge is attained, the components of this knowledge and its functions. Some of these propositions are as follows: necessity of recurrent observations for acquiring experimental knowledge, certainty plus conditional universality of such knowledge, and its role as demonstrative premises. Investigating the application of his theory in natural sciences (...)
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  19. Remark on Al-Fārābī's Missing Modal Logic and its Effect on Ibn Sīnā.Wilfrid Hodges - 2019 - Eshare: An Iranian Journal of Philosophy 1 (3):39-73.
    We reconstruct as much as we can the part of al-Fārābī's treatment of modal logic that is missing from the surviving pages of his Long Commentary on the Prior Analytics. We use as a basis the quotations from this work in Ibn Sīnā, Ibn Rushd and Maimonides, together with relevant material from al-Fārābī's other writings. We present a case that al-Fārābī's treatment of the dictum de omni had a decisive effect on the development and presentation of Ibn Sīnā's modal logic. (...)
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  20. The Concept of ‘Nature’ in Peripatetic Islamic Philosophers.Nuri Adıgüzel - 2018 - ULUM Journal of Religious Inquiries 1 (1):5-21.
    In this study, lexical and terminological meanings of the term “nature” were analyzed and some Peripatetical Islamic philosophers’ opinions about this term were included. A comparison was made between the words “tabiat” and “doğa” which are used in Turkish language to meet the term “nature”. The realm of existence which Peripatetical Islamic philosophers have used “nature” in as a noun was explained. Debate between Ibn Sīnā and Ibn Rushd (Averroes) about the necessity of proving the term “nature” was mentioned. Ibn (...)
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  21. The Merits of the Bāṭiniyya: AL-Ghazālī’s Appropriation of Ismaʿili Cosmology.Khalil Andani - 2018 - Journal of Islamic Studies 29 (2):181-229.
    This paper discusses the question of an Ismaʿili influence within the cosmology of al-Ghazālī and argues that al-Ghazālī appropriated certain features of the Ismaʿili cosmology from the Persian Ismaʿili thought of Nāṣir-i Khusraw. After introducing Nāṣir-i Khusraw and his Ismaʿili Neoplatonic cosmology, the paper first examines some of the Ismaʿili doctrinal material presented in al-Ghazālī’s anti-Ismaʿili polemical work Faḍāʾiḥ al-bāṭiniyya—concerning cosmology, revelation, and taʾwīl—and traces this content back to Nāṣir-i Khusraw’s works, arguing that Nāṣir-i Khusraw was one of the sources (...)
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  22. Avicenna's Healing and the Metaphysics of Truth.Daniel D. De Haan - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (1):17-44.
    In this study, I expound Avicenna's doctrine of truth as it is presented in his Metaphysics of the Healing. My aim is to establish two theses. First, that Avicenna has a rich and systematic metaphysical doctrine of truth that is worked out within the epistemological, ontological, aitiological, and theological investigations of the Ilāhiyyāt. Second, that his doctrine of truth draws upon the accounts of truth he found in his predecessors, and that he amplifies these accounts in light of his own (...)
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  23. Anzahl Und Ausmaß. Die Griechisch-Arabisch-Lateinische Rezeption der Aristotelischen Zeitdefinition.Andreas Lammer - 2018 - Das Mittelalter 23 (1):109-127.
    This paper traces the reception of the Aristotelian definition of time from its earliest to its most authoritative interpretations, and describes how their readings pave the way for a sophisticated amalgamation of divergent Aristotelian and Platonic elements in the temporal theory of Avicenna. The focus of attention lies on specific perceptions of the relation between time and motion, more precisely on the contrary descriptions of time as the measure of motion and motion as the measure of time. The latter leads (...)
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  24. The Morally Difficult Notion of Heaven.Amir Saemi - 2018 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 92 (3):429-444.
    I will argue that Avicenna’s and Aquinas’s faith-based virtue ethics are crucially different from Aristotle’s virtue ethics, in that their ethics hinges on the theological notion of heaven, which is constitutively independent of the ethical life of the agent. As a result, their faith-based virtue ethics is objectionable. Moreover, I will also argue that the notion of heaven that Avicenna and Aquinas deploy in their moral philosophy is problematic; for it can rationally permit believers to commit morally horrendous actions. Finally, (...)
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  25. Simplicity’s Deficiency: Al-Ghazali’s Defense of the Divine Attributes and Contemporary Trinitarian Metaphysics.Nicholas Martin - 2017 - Topoi 36 (4):665-673.
    I reconstruct and analyze al-Ghazali’s arguments defending a plurality of real divine attributes in The Incoherence of the Philosophers. I show that one of these arguments can be made to engage with and defend Jeffrey E. Brower and Michael C. Rea’s “Numerical Sameness Without Identity” model of the Trinity. To that end, I provide some background on the metaphysical commitments at play in al-Ghazali’s arguments.
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  26. Review: What is Islam? The Importance of Being Islamic by Shahab Ahmed. [REVIEW]Khalil Andani - 2016 - Islam and Christian-Muslim Relations 28:114-117.
    ‘[A] valid concept of “Islam” must denote and connote all possible “Islams,” whether abstract or “real,” mental or social’ (104)... Ahmed seeks to avoid two major pitfalls: (1) making Islam into a static essence or a category within an essentialist framework – such as proscription/prescription, ‘religion’,‘civilization’, ‘culture’, ‘orthodoxy’, etc., and (2) rendering Islam into a totally incoherent concept by conceding that there are as many islams as there are communities or individuals. Ahmed’s thesis (presented in Chapter 5) is that Islam (...)
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  27. Where Does Avicenna Demonstrate the Existence of God?Daniel D. De Haan - 2016 - Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 26 (1):97-128.
    This study examines a number of different answers to the question: wheredoes Avicenna demonstrate the existence of God within the Metaphysics of the Healing? Many interpreters have contended that there is an argument for God’s existence in Metaphysics of the Healing I.6–7. In this study I show that such views are incorrect and that the only argument for God’s existence in the Metaphysics of the Healing is found in VIII.1–3. My own interpretation relies upon a careful consideration of the scientific (...)
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  28. Peter Adamson, Ed., Interpreting Avicenna. Critical Essays. Reviewed By.Alessandro Giostra - 2016 - Philosophy in Review 36 (6):235-237.
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  29. The Elements of Avicenna’s Physics: Greek Sources and Arabic Innovations.Andreas Lammer - 2016 - Berlin, Germany: Walter de Gruyter.
    This study is the first comprehensive analysis of the physical theory of the Islamic philosopher Avicenna (d. 1037). It seeks to understand his contribution against the developments within the preceding Greek and Arabic intellectual milieus, and to appreciate his philosophy as such by emphasising his independence as a critical and systematic thinker. Exploring Avicenna’s method of "teaching and learning," it investigates the implications of his account of the natural body as a three-dimensionally extended composite of matter and form, and examines (...)
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  30. Avicenna : Logic.Internet Encylcopedia of Philosophy - 2016
    Avicenna : Logic Avicenna is one of the most important philosophers and logicians in the Arabic world. His logical works are presented in several treatises. Some of them are commentaries on Aristotle's Organon, and are presented in al-Shifa al-Mantiq, the logical part of … Continue reading Avicenna : Logic →.
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  31. Il De mineralibus di Avicenna tradotto da Alfredo di Shareshill.Elisa Rubino & Samuela Pagani - 2016 - Bulletin de Philosophie Medievale 58:23-87.
    The author presents a critical edition of the Latin treatise De mineralibus, which was generally attributed to Aristotle in the Middle Ages, but is in fact an abridgement of two chapters from Avicenna’s Kitāb al-Šifā’ compiled and translated from Arabic by Alfred of Sareshill, who put them at the end of the Liber metheororum, the first Latin version of Aristotle’s Meteorology. De mineralibus is transmitted by more than a hundred manuscripts. The edition is based on the complete collation of ten (...)
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  32. Avicenna on Knowledge , Certainty , Cause and the Relative.Riccardo Strobino - 2016 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 24 (3):426-446.
    In his Kitāb al-Burhān, Avicenna discusses a theoretical framework broadly inspired by Aristotle's Posterior Analytics which brings together logic, epistemology and metaphysics. One of the central questions explored in the book is the problem of the relation between knowledge, certainty and causal explanation. Burhān 1.8, in particular, is devoted to the analysis of how certainty comes about in causal as opposed to non-causal contexts. The distinction is understood in Avicenna's system as one between cases in which the conclusion of an (...)
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  33. Avicenna on the Nature of Mathematical Objects.Mohammad Saleh Zarepour - 2016 - Dialogue 55 (3):511-536.
    Some authors have proposed that Avicenna considers mathematical objects, i.e., geometric shapes and numbers, to be mental existents completely separated from matter. In this paper, I will show that this description, though not completely wrong, is misleading. Avicenna endorses, I will argue, some sort of literalism, potentialism, and finitism.
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  34. Avicenna on the Soul's Power to Manipulate Material Objects.Yasin Ramazan Basaran - 2015 - Eskiyeni 30 (2):145-157.
    In his article on the foundations of Ficino’s ideas on magic, James Hankins observes that, where Ficino justifies non-material causation in the universe, he is heavily indebted to Avicenna. As Hankins also points out, this Avicennan idea clearly violates the Aristotelian maxim that ‘physical causation requires contact’. Because Avicenna holds the view that the soul is neither a physical entity nor simply the form of body, Avicenna’s consent to the soul to manipulate material objects means assignment of the soul to (...)
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  35. Rethinking Abstractionism: Aquinas's Intellectual Light and Some Arabic Sources.Therese Scarpelli Cory - 2015 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 53 (4):607-646.
    The thesis of this paper is that Thomas Aquinas offers an alternative model of abstraction (the Active Principle Model) that overcomes the standard objections to abstractionism and expands our view of what an abstractionist theory might look like. I contend that this alternative model of abstraction has been invisible in plain sight, in Aquinas’s references to the mind’s abstractive mechanism as an “intellectual light.” Such language is not metaphorical but rather technical, signaling that intellectual abstraction is to be modeled on (...)
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  36. The Doctrine of the Analogy of Being in Avicenna’s Metaphysics of the Healing.Daniel D. De Haan - 2015 - Review of Metaphysics 69 (2):261-286.
    This essay expounds Avicenna’s doctrine of the analogy of being and examine the function it plays in his Metaphysics of the Healing. In the first part addresses the question: What is Avicenna’s doctrine of the analogy of being? The essay begins by situating Avicenna’s doctrine of the analogy of being within the epistemological framework of his account of metaphysics as an Aristotelian science. It then explicates Avicenna’s own presentation of analogy within his account of names of univocity, analogy, resemblance, and (...)
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  37. Avicenna and the Aristotelian Tradition: Introduction to Reading Avicenna’s Philosophical Works.M. Cüneyt Kaya - 2015 - Nazariyat, Journal for the History of Islamic Philosophy and Sciences 4 (7):146-150.
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  38. Faculties in Arabic Philosophy.Taneli Kukkonen - 2015 - In Dominik Perler (ed.), The Faculties: A History. Oxford University Press. pp. 66-96.
  39. Avicenna: The Pleasure of Knowledge and the Quietude of the Soul.Olga Lizzini - 2015 - Quaestio 15:265-273.
    In his Metaphysics of the Healing, Avicenna presents his ideas about the destiny of the human soul in the afterlife. Considered philosophically, the afterlife is intellectual. The human soul achieves perfection by becoming an intellectual world in which the whole of reality may be reflected. Analysing the meaning of this statement helps to elucidate not only how Avicenna conceives intellectual pleasure in the afterlife, but also how he characterizes the very process of knowledge. Intertwined therewith are at least two important (...)
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  40. Interpreting Avicenna: Critical Essays Edited by Peter Adamson.Toby Mayer - 2015 - Journal of Islamic Studies 26 (3):315-322.
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  41. A Small Discovery: Avicenna’s Theory of Minima Naturalia.Jon McGinnis - 2015 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 53 (1):1-24.
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  42. Memory as an Internal Sense: Avicenna and the Reception of His Psychology by Thomas Aquinas.Jörn Müller - 2015 - Quaestio 15:497-506.
    Avicenna develops a highly original account of memory as one of the five internal senses. In this paper, I briefly reconstruct this conception and evaluate its influence on the faculty psychology which emerged in the Latin West from the 12th century onwards. Particular attention is paid to Thomas Aquinas’s harsh criticism of Avicenna’s denial of intellectual memory, which touches on several epistemological, anthropological and theological issues.
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  43. La metafísica como perfección del deseo humano. Comentario a Philosophia Prima del Avicenna Latinus.F. O'Reilly & Francisco O'Reilly - 2015 - Quaestio 15:245-254.
    After having developed his theory of being, the causes and theology, Avicenna studies in chapter 7 of book IX of Philosophia prima the end of human beings. In this paper I analyze Avicenna’s considerations from a metaphysical perspective, and the importance that metaphysics has in the education of human desire. This education must be developed on metaphysical grounds because human being’s most proper desire does not match that of our sensitive desires. This kind of desire is not immediate to our (...)
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  44. Two Arguments for Natural Teleology From Avicenna’s Shifā’.Kara Richardson - 2015 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 32 (2):123-140.
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  45. The Concept of Being; Where There Is No Pertinence Between Avicenna and Aristotle’s Live Dog Better Than Dead King.Alireza Saati - 2015 - Philosophy Study 5 (2).
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  46. Doubts on Avicenna: A Study and Edition of Sharaf Al-Dīn Al-Masʿūdī’s Commentary on the Ishārāt.Ayman Shihadeh - 2015 - Brill.
    In _Doubts on Avicenna_, Ayman Shihadeh offers an extended study and critical edition of Sharaf al-Dīn al-Masʿūdī’s _al-Mabāḥith wa-l-Shukūk_, a key and hitherto unstudied source for twelfth-century Arabic philosophy. This text inaugurates the long commentarial tradition on Avicenna’s _Ishārāt_.
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  47. Self-Awareness in Islamic Philosophy: Avicenna and Beyond.Mehmet Zahit Tiryaki - 2015 - Nazariyat, Journal for the History of Islamic Philosophy and Sciences 1 (3):209-214.
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  48. Aristotle’s Dunamis Transformed: On Avicenna’s Conception of Natural Isti‘Dad and Tahayyu’.İbrahim Halil Üçer - 2015 - Nazariyat, Journal for the History of Islamic Philosophy and Sciences 1 (3):37-76.
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  49. Siger, Avicenna, and Albert the Great on Universals and Natures.Antoine Côté - 2014 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 17 (1):99-122.
    This paper examines Siger of Brabant’s doctrine of universals in light of Siger’s critical discussion of two highly influential philosophers on the issue of universals in the Middle Ages, Avicenna and Albert the Great. Although Siger unequivocally rejects Albert ’s views on universals – rightly so, given Albert ’s commitment to a rather robust form of realism –, he is far less hostile to Avicenna’s ideas on the subject than he is to Albert ’s. The paper examines Siger’s contrasting attitudes (...)
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  50. Necessary Existence and the Doctrine of Being in Avicenna's Metaphysics of the Healing: On the Function of the Fundamental Scientific First Principles of Metaphysics.Daniel De Haan - 2014 - Dissertation, KU Leuven
    This thesis is concerned with answering the question, what is the central argument of Avicenna’s Metaphysics of the Healing that brings its opening ontological approach to the subject of first philosophy to its ultimate theological goal and conclusion? This dissertation contends that it is the function of the fundamental scientific first principles of metaphysics, and in particular the fundamental primary notion necessary, to provide the intelligible link that Avicenna employs to demonstrate the existence and true-nature of the divine necessary existence (...)
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1 — 50 / 433