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  1. What, If Anything, Renders All Humans Morally Equal?Richard J. Arneson - 1999 - In . Blackwell. pp. 103-128.
    All humans have an equal basic moral status. They possess the same fundamental rights, and the comparable interests of each person should count the same in calculations that determine social policy. Neither supposed racial differences, nor skin color, sex, sexual orientation, ethnicity, intelligence, nor any other differences among humans negate their fundamental equal worth and dignity. These platitudes are virtually universally affirmed. A white supremacist racist or an admirer of Adolf Hitler who denies them is rightly regarded as beyond the (...)
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  2. Equality and Transparency.Julien Beillard - 2013 - American Philosophical Quarterly 50 (1):51-61.
    The principle of human moral equality is poorly understood. I criticize standard accounts and propose a mildly subversive alternative based in a certain view of the phenomenology of conceptual thought. First, a formulation of the principle: -/- (E) Every person has a basic moral worth equal to that of any other. -/- E is vague, as it should be. It is neutral regarding rival theories of the nature of the equalizing property or its value, or how we recognize either. But (...)
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  3. Egalitarianism and the Equal Consideration of Interests.Stanley I. Benn - 1967 - In Louis P. Pojman & Robert Westmoreland (eds.), Equality: Selected Readings. Oup Usa.
  4. Individualism at an Impasse.Samuel Black - 1991 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 21 (3):347 - 377.
  5. On the Meaning and Justification of the Equality Principle.W. T. Blackstone - 1967 - Ethics 77 (4):239-253.
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  6. An Egalitarian Plateau? Challenging the Importance of Ronald Dworkin's Abstract Egalitarian Rights.Alexander Brown - 2007 - Res Publica 13 (3):255-291.
    Ronald Dworkin’s work on the topic of equality over the past twenty-five years or so has been enormously influential, generating a great deal of debate about equality both as a practical aim and as a theoretical ideal. The present article attempts to assess the importance of one particular aspect of this work. Dworkin claims that the acceptance of abstract egalitarian rights to equal concern and respect can be thought to provide a kind of plateau in political argument, accommodating as it (...)
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  7. Does Every Normative Theory of Social Arrangement Demand Equality of Something? Re-Examining Amartya Sen’s Writings on Equality.Alexander Brown - 2006 - Imprints 9:211-249.
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  8. The Presumption of Equality.D. E. Browne - 1975 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 53 (1):46 – 53.
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  9. Moral Status and Human Enhancement.Allen Buchanan - 2009 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 37 (4):346-381.
  10. The Egalitarianism of Human Rights.Allen Buchanan - 2004 - Ethics 120 (4):679-710.
  11. The New Pluralism: William Connolly and the Contemporary Global Condition.David Campbell & Morton Schoolman (eds.) - 2008 - Duke University Press.
    William Connolly, one of the best-known and most important political theorists writing today, is a principal architect of the “new pluralism.” In this volume, leading thinkers in contemporary political theory and international relations provide a comprehensive investigation of the new pluralism, Connolly’s contributions to it, and its influence on the fields of political theory and international relations. Together they trace the evolution of Connolly’s ideas, illuminating his challenges to the “old,” conventional pluralist theory that dominated American and British political science (...)
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  12. Basic Equality and the Site of Egalitarian Justice.Ian Carter - 2013 - Economics and Philosophy 29 (1):21-41.
    The nature of basic equality (what it is that makes us all equals) can have implications not only for the question of the currency of egalitarian justice but also for that of its . The latter question is raised by G. A. Cohen in his critique of John Rawls's theory of justice. In this paper I argue that Rawlsian liberals might provide an answer to Cohen's critique by establishing two distinct kinds of basic equality, thus providing a of basic equality. (...)
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  13. Respect and the Basis of Equality.Ian Carter - 2011 - Ethics 121 (3):538-571.
    In what sense are persons equal, such that it is appropriate to treat them as equals? This difficult question has been strangely neglected by political philosophers. A plausible answer can be found by adopting a particular interpretation of the idea of respect. Central to this interpretation is the thought that in order to respect persons we need to treat them as ‘opaque', paying attention only to their outward features as agents. This proposed basis of equality has important implications for the (...)
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  14. Undignified Bioethics.Alasdair Cochrane - 2010 - Bioethics 24 (5):234-241.
    The concept of dignity is pervasive in bioethics. However, some bioethicists have argued that it is useless on three grounds: that it is indeterminate; that it is reactionary; and that it is redundant. In response, a number of defences of dignity have recently emerged. All of these defences claim that when dignity is suitably clarified, it can be of great use in helping us tackle bioethical controversies. This paper rejects such defences of dignity. It outlines the four most plausible conceptions (...)
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  15. Finding Oneself in the Other.G. A. Cohen (ed.) - 2012 - Princeton University Press.
    This is the second of three volumes of posthumously collected writings of G. A. Cohen, who was one of the leading, and most progressive, figures in contemporary political philosophy. This volume brings together some of Cohen's most personal philosophical and nonphilosophical essays, many of them previously unpublished. Rich in first-person narration, insight, and humor, these pieces vividly demonstrate why Thomas Nagel described Cohen as a "wonderful raconteur." The nonphilosophical highlight of the book is Cohen's remarkable account of his first trip (...)
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  16. By Nature Equal: The Anatomy of a Western Insight.John E. Coons & Patrick M. Brennan (eds.) - 1999 - Princeton University Press.
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  17. The Basis of Equality.Geoffrey Cupit - 2000 - Philosophy 75 (1):105-125.
    This paper considers on what basis justice may require that people be treated as equals. It begins with an examination of the argument that people are to be treated as equals because they are equals, and suggests reasons for thinking that such an argument is unlikely to succeed. The remainder of the paper considers, and tries to make plausible, the argument that justice requires people be treated as equals because they are individuals. Thus the paper offers some support for the (...)
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  18. The Second-Person Standpoint: Morality, Respect, and Accountability.Stephen L. Darwall - 2006 - Harvard University Press.
    The result is nothing less than a fundamental reorientation of moral theory that enables it at last to account for morality's supreme authority--an account that ...
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  19. Two Kinds of Respect.Stephen L. Darwall - 1977 - Ethics 88 (1):36-49.
    S. 39: "My project in this paper is to develop the initial distinction which I have drawn between recognition and appraisal respect into a more detailed and specific account of each. These accounts will not merely be of intrinsic interest. Ultimately I will use them to illuminate the puzzles with which this paper began and to understand the idea of self-respect." 42 " Thus, insofar as respect within such a pursuit will depend on an appraisal of the participant from the (...)
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  20. Taking Animals Seriously: Mental Life and Moral Status.David DeGrazia (ed.) - 1996 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book distinguishes itself from much of the polemical literature on these issues by offering the most judicious and well-balanced account yet available of animals' moral standing, and related questions concerning their minds and welfare. Transcending jejune debates focused on utilitarianism versus rights, the book offers a fresh methodological approach with specific and constructive conclusions about our treatment of animals. David DeGrazia provides the most thorough discussion yet of whether equal consideration should be extended to animals' interests, and examines the (...)
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  21. Human Enhancement and Supra-Personal Moral Status.Thomas Douglas - 2013 - Philosophical Studies 162 (3):473-497.
    Several authors have speculated that (1) the pharmaceutical, genetic or other technological enhancement of human mental capacities could result in the creation of beings with greater moral status than persons, and (2) the creation of such beings would harm ordinary, unenhanced humans, perhaps by reducing their immunity to permissible harm. These claims have been taken to ground moral objections to the unrestrained pursuit of human enhancement. In recent work, Allen Buchanan responds to these objections by questioning both (1) and (2). (...)
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  22. Comment on Narveson: In Defense of Equality.Ronald Dworkin - 1983 - Social Philosophy and Policy 1 (1):24.
    Professor Narveson's comments about my papers on equality are both penetrating and comprehensive. I cannot hope to discuss all the issues he raises in any detail. But there is a special problem: his main question is about what I have not said. He asks how I might defend equality of resources other than simply by describing a version of it, and of course this question will require some extended discussion. But he is right to say that this is his most (...)
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  23. Basic Human Worth and Religious Restraint.C. J. Eberle - 2009 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 35 (1-2):151-181.
    The Doctrine of Religious Restraint is the claim that citizens and officials in a liberal democracy should not support coercive laws that they know to require a religious rationale. The most prominent argument for the Doctine of Religious Restraint appeals to the claim that we ought to treat each person as having basic worth: citizens and officials ought to obey the Doctrine of Religious Restraint because doing so is required in order for them to respect their compatriots as persons who (...)
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  24. The Idea of Equality Revisited.J. Elster - 1995 - World, Mind, and Ethics, Cambridge, Cup.
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  25. Equality and Generalization: A Formal Analysis.R. E. Flathman - 1967 - In . Atherton Press.
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  26. Moral Equality and the Foundations of Liberal Moral Theory.Jonathan Friday - 2004 - Journal of Value Inquiry 38 (1):61-74.
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  27. The Justification of Egalitarian Justice.Alan Gewirth - 1971 - American Philosophical Quarterly 8 (4):331 - 341.
  28. On Being Morally Considerable.Kenneth E. Goodpaster - 1978 - Journal of Philosophy 75 (6):308-325.
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  29. Two Worries About Respect for Persons.Leslie Green - 2010 - Ethics 120 (2):212-231.
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  30. "Prescriptive Equality": Two Steps Forward.Kent Greenawalt - 1997 - Harvard Law Review 110 (6):1265-1290.
    In this Response to Professor Peters, Professor Greenawalt argues that prescriptive equality does have meaningful normative force. Prescriptive equality plays a reinforcing role when it agrees with nonegalitarian justice and is not incoherent when it pulls against nonegalitarian justice. Specifically, when one individual has been treated better than is required by nonegalitarian justice, a similarly situated and significantly related individual who is aware of that treatment may merit equivalent treatment because of widespread and deep-seated feelings about equality.
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  31. How Empty Is the Idea of Equality.Kent Greenawalt - 1983 - Columbia Law Review 83:1167.
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  32. Well-Being: Its Meaning, Measurement and Moral Importance.James Griffin - 1986 - Clarendon Press.
    "Well-being," "welfare," "utility," and "quality of life," all closely related concepts, are at the center of morality, politics, law, and economics. Griffin's book, while primarily a volume of moral philosophy, is relevant to all of these subjects. Griffin offers answers to three central questions about well-being: what is the best way to understand it, can it be measured, and where should it fit in moral and political thought. With its breadth of investigation and depth of insight, this work holds significance (...)
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  33. Liberal Equality.Amy Gutmann (ed.) - 1980 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book makes a significant contribution to the tradition of liberal political theory: it explores the foundations and limits of the idea of equality within that theory and offers a sustained argument for a persuasive new view of liberalism. Liberal thinking has always displayed a tension between the claims of liberty and those of equality. Professor Gutmann examines the contributions of liberal theorists from Locke to Rawls on the subject of two kinds of equality - equality of opportunity to participate (...)
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  34. Feminist Contractarianism.J. Hampton - 2006 - In . Cambridge University Press.
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  35. Reply to Mackie.R. M. Hare - 1989 - In . Oxford University Press.
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  36. Moral Thinking: Its Levels, Method, and Point.R. M. Hare (ed.) - 1981 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    In this work, the author has fashioned out of the logical and linguistic theses of his earlier books a full-scale but readily intelligible account of moral argument.
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  37. Universalisability.R. M. Hare - 1954 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 55:295 - 312.
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  38. The Potentiality Problem.Elizabeth Harman - 2003 - Philosophical Studies 114 (1-2):173 - 198.
    Many people face a problem about potentiality: their moral beliefs appear to dictate inconsistent views about the significance of the potentiality to become a healthy adult. Briefly, the problem arises as follows. Consider the following two claims. First, both human babies and cats have moral status, but harms to babies matter more, morally, than similar harms to cats. Second, early human embryos lack moral status. It appears that the first claim can only be true if human babies have more moral (...)
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  39. Essays on Ethics, Social Behavior, and Scientific Explanation.John C. Harsanyi (ed.) - 1976 - Springer.
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  40. Why We Are Not Moral Equals.Stan Husi - 2017 - The Journal of Ethics 21 (4):375-401.
    Faith in the universal moral equality of people enjoys close to unanimous consensus in present moral and political philosophy. Yet its philosophical justification remains precarious. The search for the basis of equality encounters insurmountable difficulties. Nothing short of a miracle seems required to stabilize universal equality in moral status amidst a vast space of distinctions sprawling between people. The difficulties of stabilizing equality against differentiation are not specific to any particular choice regarding the basis of equality. To show this, I (...)
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  41. Why Equality? On Justifying Liberal Egalitarianism.Paul Kelly - 2010 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 13 (1):55-70.
    The debate over the nature of egalitarianism has come to dominate political philosophy. As ever more sophisticated attempts are made to describe the principles of an egalitarian distribution or to specify the good or goods that should be distributed equally, little is said about the fundamental basis of equality. In virtue of what should people be regarded as equal? Egalitarians have tended to dismiss this question of fundamental equality. In the first part of the paper I will examine some of (...)
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  42. Two Concepts of Basic Equality.Kirby Nikolas - forthcoming - Res Publica:1-22.
    It has become somewhat a commonplace in recent political philosophy to remark that all plausible political theories must share at least one fundamental premise, ‘that all humans are one another's equals’. One single concept of ‘basic equality’, therefore, is cast as the common touchstone of all contemporary political thought. This paper argues that this claim is false. Virtually all do indeed say that all humans are ‘equals’ in some basic sense. However, this is not the same sense. There are not (...)
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  43. Contemporary Political Philosophy: An Introduction.Will Kymlicka (ed.) - 2001 - Oxford University Press.
    This new edition of Will Kymlicka's best selling critical introduction to contemporary political theory has been fully revised to include many of the most significant developments in Anglo-American political philosophy in the last eleven years, particularly the new debates over issues of democratic citizenship and cultural pluralism. The book now includes two new chapters on citizenship theory and multiculturalism, in addition to updated chapters on utilitarianism, liberal egalitarianism, libertarianism, socialism, communitarianism, and feminism. The many thinkers discussed include G. A. Cohen, (...)
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  44. The Genetic Account of Moral Status: A Defense.S. Matthew Liao - 2012 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 9 (2):265-277.
    Christopher Grau argues that the genetic basis for moral agency account of rightholding is problematic because it fails to grant all human beings the moral status of rightholding; it grants the status of rightholding to entities that do not intuitively deserve such status; and it assumes that the genetic basis for moral agency has intrinsic/final value, but the genetic basis for moral agency only has instrumental value. Grau also argues that those who are inclined to hold that all human beings (...)
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  45. The Basis of Human Moral Status.S. Matthew Liao - 2010 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 7 (2):159-179.
    When philosophers consider what moral status human beings have, they tend to find themselves either supporting the idea that not all human beings are rightholders or adopting what Peter Singer calls a 'speciesist' position, where speciesism is defined as morally favoring a particular species—in this case, human beings—over others without sufficient justification. In this paper, I develop what I call the 'genetic basis for moral agency' account of rightholding, and I propose that this account can allow all human beings to (...)
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  46. Why Killing Some People is More Seriously Wrong Than Killing Others.Kasper Lippert‐Rasmussen - 2007 - Ethics 117 (4):716-738.
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  47. Equality Within the Limits of Reason Alone.David Lloyd Thomas - 1979 - Mind Oxford 88 (352):538-553.
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  48. Against Equality Again.J. R. Lucas - 1977 - Philosophy 52 (201):255 - 280.
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  49. Against Equality.J. R. Lucas - 1965 - Philosophy 40 (154):296 - 307.
    Equality is the great political issue of our time. Liberty is forgotten: Fraternity never did engage our passions: the maintenance of Law and Order is at a discount: Natural Rights and Natural Justice are outmoded shibboleths. But Equality—there men have something to die for, kill for, agitate about, be miserable about. The demand for Equality obsesses all our political thought. We are not sure what it is—indeed, as I shall show later, we are necessarily not sure what it is—but we (...)
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  50. Rights, Utility, and Universalization.J. L. Mackie - 1984 - Utility and Rights.
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