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  1. From Perception to Metaphysics: Reflections on Berkeley and Merleau-Ponty.John T. Sanders - manuscript
    George Berkeley's apparently strange view – that nothing exists without a mind except for minds themselves – is notorious. Also well known, and equally perplexing at a superficial level, is his insistence that his doctrine is no more than what is consistent with common sense. It was every bit as crucial for Berkeley that it be demonstrated that the colors are really in the tulip, as that there is nothing that is neither a mind nor something perceived by a mind. (...)
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  2. The Issue of Causality in Locke's and Berkeley's Philosophies.Abbas Sheikh-sho'aei - unknown - Kheradnameh Sadra Quarterly 13.
    Locke believes in the existence of the corporeal substance arguing that qualities and attributes cannot be self-subsistent and, therefore, need such a substance to hang on. Nonetheless, Berkeley stresses that qualities even the so-called 'primary qualities.' are all the same species which depend on the mind of the perceiver. The external existence, Berkeley maintains, is no more than a collection of qualities that are imagained by the perceiver. Locke says that the origin of our perception is an external substance but (...)
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  3. George Berkeley and Jonathan Edwards on Idealism: Considering an Old Question in Light of New Evidence.Scott Fennema - 2019 - Intellectual History Review 29 (2):265-290.
  4. What Descartes Doubted, Berkeley Denied, and Kant Endorsed.Kenneth L. Pearce - 2019 - Dialogue 58 (1):31-63.
    According to Kant, there is some doctrine, which he sometimes calls 'empirical realism,' such that it was doubted by Descartes, denied by Berkeley, and endorsed by Kant himself. It may be doubted whether there really is such a doctrine or, if there is, whether it takes the form Kant seems to say it does. For instance, if empirical realism is taken as the assertion that familiar objects like tables and chairs exist, then this doctrine was neither seriously doubted by Descartes, (...)
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  5. Hey, What's the Big Idea? Berkeley and Hume on Extension, Local Conjunction, and the Immateriality of the Soul.Don Garrett - 2018 - In Stefan Storrie (ed.), Berkeley's Three Dialogues: New Essays. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 191-204.
  6. Berkeley on Continuous Creation: Occasionalism Contained.Sukjae Lee - 2018 - In Stefan Storrie (ed.), Berkeley's Three Dialogues: New Essays. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 106-122.
  7. On Sattopalambhavāda or an Indian Version of Esse Est Percipi Zolzaya Munkhtseren.Shinya Moriyama - 2018 - Proceedings of the XXIII World Congress of Philosophy 4:61-68.
    Esse est percipi---this famous phrase of 18th century British philosopher, George Berkeley, is known to be an Idealist challenge against our common sense that there are mind-independent things. In contrast with the familiarity Berkeley’s theory, the existence of similar theory in Indian Buddhism in the 8th century is widely unknown. The Indian version of this theory can be expressed in Sanskrit, sattopalambhavāda, i.e., the theory claiming that “to be is to perceive/to be perceived.” The first and probably last philosopher who (...)
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  8. Three Objections Against Phenomenalist Interpretations of Kant Defeated.Michael Oberst - 2018 - Studi Kantiani 31:119-136.
    Many passages in Kant’s texts suggest that he is a phenomenalist about appearances, i.e., that appearances are only part of our mental content and do not exist outside our mind. In recent years, however, phenomenalist readings of Kant’s idealism have been of ill repute. Without wanting to make a positive case for phenomenalism, this paper attempts to rebut three particularly popular objections to any phenomenalist reading. In slogan form, they are 1) «There is only prima facie evidence», 2) «Kant is (...)
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  9. La crítica de George Berkeley al representacionalismo de John Locke.Alberto Oya - 2018 - Anales Del Seminario de Historia de la Filosofía 35 (1):109-126.
    En su Tratado sobre los principios del conocimiento humano, George Berkeley ofrece una serie de argumentos cuyo objetivo es criticar la tesis materialista. Mi propósito en este artículo es reconstruir y analizar en detalle estos argumentos. Dado que la crítica de Berkeley al materialismo es, fundamentalmente, una crítica al materialismo representacionalista de John Locke, empezaré este artículo explicando cuáles son las ideas básicas de la propuesta de Locke.
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  10. Is Shepherd's Pen Mightier Than Berkeley's Word?Samuel C. Rickless - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (2):317-330.
    In 1827, Lady Mary Shepherd published Essays on the Perception of an External Universe, which offers both an argument for the existence of a world of external bodies existing outside our minds and a criticism of Berkeley's argument for idealism in A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge. In this paper, I evaluate Margaret Atherton's criticisms of Shepherd's case against Berkeley, and provide reasons for thinking that, although Shepherd's particular criticisms of Berkeley do not succeed, she correctly identifies an (...)
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  11. A Puzzle in the Three Dialogues and Its Platonic Resolution.John Russell Roberts - 2018 - In Stefan Storrie (ed.), Berkeley's Three Dialogues: New Essays. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 146-159.
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  12. Action, Knowledge and Embodiment in Berkeley and Locke.Tom Stoneham - 2018 - Philosophical Explorations 21 (1):41-59.
    Embodiment is a fact of human existence which philosophers should not ignore. They may differ to a great extent in what they have to say about our bodies, but they have to take into account that for each of us our body has a special status, it is not merely one amongst the physical objects, but a physical object to which we have a unique relation. While Descartes approached the issue of embodiment through consideration of sensation and imagination, it is (...)
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  13. Kantian Phenomenalism Without Berkeleyan Idealism.Tim Jankowiak - 2017 - Kantian Review 22 (2):205-231.
    Phenomenalist interpretations of Kant are out of fashion. The most common complaint from anti-phenomenalist critics is that a phenomenalist reading of Kant would collapse Kantian idealism into Berkeleyan idealism. This would be unacceptable because Berkeleyan idealism is incompatible with core elements of Kant’s empirical realism. In this paper, I argue that not all phenomenalist readings threaten empirical realism. First, I distinguish several variants of phenomenalism, and then show that Berkeley’s idealism is characterized by his commitment to most of them. I (...)
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  14. Prior, Berkeley, and the Barcan Formula.James Levine - 2016 - Synthese 193 (11):3551-3565.
    This paper presents structural similarities and historical connections between Prior’s rejection of the Barcan formula and his critique of Berkeley’s master argument for idealism in his 1955 paper “Berkeley in Logical Form”. Making use of Mackie’s paper “Self-Refutation—A Formal Analysis”, it concludes with some suggestions concerning what is at stake in the debate between Prior and Berkeley and in structurally similar debates such as whether to accept the Barcan formula.
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  15. What is the Matter with Matter, According to Plotinus?A. A. Long - 2016 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 78:37-54.
    Modern science is not linguistically original in hypothesizing the existence of dark matter. For Plotinus, the matter that underlies all perceptible objects, is essentially obscure and describable only in the negative terms of what it lacks by way of inherent properties. In formulating this theory of absolute matter, Plotinus took himself to be interpreting both Plato and Aristotle, with the result that his own position emerges as a highly original and equivocal synthesis of this tradition. Plotinus did not claim that (...)
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  16. De Pascal a Locke: la reprise berkeleyenne des enjeux philosophiques concernant la tolerance religieuse et civile.Sebastien Charles - 2015 - In Berkeley Revisited: Moral, Social and Political Philosophy. Voltaire Foundation. pp. 177-190.
  17. George Berkeley's Understanding of Beauty and His Polemic with Shaftesbury.Adam Grzelinski - 2015 - In Sebastien Charles (ed.), Berkeley Revisited: Moral, Social and Political Philosophy. Voltaire Foundation. pp. 209-226.
  18. On Hume's Defense of Berkeley.Alan Schwerin - 2015 - Open Journal of Philosophy 5 (6):327 - 337.
    In 1739 Hume bequeathed a bold view of the self to the philosophical community that would prove highly influential, but equally controversial. His bundle theory of the self elicited substantial opposition soon after its appearance in the Treatise of Human Nature. Yet Hume makes it clear to his readers that his views on the self rest on respectable foundations: namely, the views of the highly regarded Irish philosopher, George Berkeley. As the author of the Treatise sees it, his account of (...)
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  19. Berkeley's Pragmatic Bent: Its Implications for His Social Philosophy.Richard J. Van Iten - 2015 - In Sebastien Charles (ed.), Berkeley Revisited: Moral, Social and Political Philosophy. Voltaire Foundation. pp. 83-98.
  20. Berkeley, Descartes and the Science of Nature.Jonathan Dancy - 2014 - The Harvard Review of Philosophy 20:4-16.
  21. George Berkeley : Eighteenth-Century Responses: Volume I.David Berman (ed.) - 2013 - Routledge.
    The material reprinted in this two-volume set, first published in 1989, covers the first eighty-five years in responses to George Berkeley’s writings. David Berman identifies several key waves of eighteenth-century criticism surrounding Berkeley’s philosophies, ranging from hostile and discounted, to valued and defended. The first volume includes an account of the life of Berkeley by J. Murray and key responses from 1711 to 1748, whilst the second volume covers the years between 1745 and 1796. This fascinating reissue illustrates the breadth (...)
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  22. George Berkeley (Routledge Revivals): Eighteenth-Century Responses: Volume I.David Berman (ed.) - 2013 - Routledge.
    The material reprinted in this two-volume set, first published in 1989, covers the first eighty-five years in responses to George Berkeley’s writings. David Berman identifies several key waves of eighteenth-century criticism surrounding Berkeley’s philosophies, ranging from hostile and discounted, to valued and defended. The first volume includes an account of the life of Berkeley by J. Murray and key responses from 1711 to 1748, whilst the second volume covers the years between 1745 and 1796. This fascinating reissue illustrates the breadth (...)
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  23. George Berkeley : Eighteenth-Century Responses: Volume Ii.David Berman (ed.) - 2013 - Routledge.
    The material reprinted in this two-volume set, first published in 1989, covers the first eighty-five years in responses to George Berkeley’s writings. David Berman identifies several key waves of eighteenth-century criticism surrounding Berkeley’s philosophies, ranging from hostile and discounted, to valued and defended. The first volume includes an account of the life of Berkeley by J. Murray and key responses from 1711 to 1748, whilst the second volume covers the years between 1745 and 1796. This fascinating reissue illustrates the breadth (...)
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  24. As posições de Newton, Locke e Berkeley sobre a natureza da gravitação.Silvio Seno Chibeni - 2013 - Scientiae Studia 11 (4):811-839.
    Ao defender, nos Princípios matemáticos de filosofia natural, a existência de uma força de gravitação universal, Newton desencadeou uma onda de dúvidas e objeções filosóficas. Suas próprias declarações sobre a natureza da gravitação não são facilmente interpretáveis como formando um conjunto consistente de opiniões. Por um lado, logo após fornecer as três definições de "quantidades de forças centrípetas" (Defs. 6-8), Newton observa que está tratando tais forças "matematicamente", sem se pronunciar sobre sua realidade física. Mas, por outro lado, no Escólio (...)
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  25. Dwa Typy Racjonalności — Berkeley I Newton.Jacek Gurczyński - 2013 - Rocznik Filozoficzny Ignatianum 19 (1).
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  26. How to Avoid Solipsism While Remaining an Idealist: Lessons From Berkeley and Dharmakirti.Jeremy E. Henkel - 2013 - Comparative Philosophy 3 (1):58-73.
    This essay examines the strategies that Berkeley and Dharmakīrti utilize to deny that idealism entails solipsism. Beginning from similar arguments for the non-existence of matter, the two philosophers employ markedly different strategies for establishing the existence of other minds. This difference stems from their responses to the problem of intersubjective agreement. While Berkeley’s reliance on his Cartesian inheritance does allow him to account for intersubjective agreement without descending into solipsism, it nevertheless prevents him from establishing the existence of other finite (...)
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  27. Idea and Ontology: An Essay in Early Modern Metaphysics of Ideas.Marc A. Hight - 2013 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    The prevailing view about the history of early modern philosophy, which the author dubs “the early modern tale” and wants to convince us is really a fairy tale, has it that the focus on ideas as a solution to various epistemological puzzles, first introduced by Descartes, created difficulties for the traditional ontological scheme of substance and mode. The early modern tale depicts the development of “the way of ideas” as abandoning ontology at least by the time of Berkeley. This, in (...)
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  28. Doświadczenie mistyczne w opowiadaniach Alef i Pismo boga Jorge Luisa Borgesa.Joanna Miksa - 2013 - Hybris, Revista de Filosofí­A (20):156-172.
    MYSTICAL EXPERIENCE IN THE ALEPH AND THE WRITING OF THE GOD BY JORGE LUIS BORGES In my paper I undertake an analysis of chosen short stories of Jorge Luis Borges in which the problem of mysticism occupies an important place. I claim that Borges, whose works are known for covering philosophical issues of most fundamental importance, is a writer who describes the impossibility of reaching a mystical experience in the modern world. As far as philosophical background of Borges is concerned (...)
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  29. Esse Est Percipi and Percept Identity in C. J. Boström’s Philosophy.Inge-Bert Täljedal - 2013 - Idealistic Studies 43 (1-2):63-70.
    Berkeley’s ‘esse is percipi’ has been criticized for implying epistemological solipsism, the main argument being that different minds cannot harbor numerically one and the same idea. Similarly, C. J. Boström, the dominating Swedish philosopher in the nineteenth century, was early scorned because his principle of esse est percipi allegedly contradicts the simultaneous claim that two spirits can perceive the same thing under qualitatively different appearances. Whereas the criticism against Berkeley is here regarded as valid, it is argued that Boström successfully (...)
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  30. Hutcheson, Perception, and the Sceptic's Challenge.Fred Ablondi - 2012 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (2):269-281.
    Francis Hutcheson's theory of perception, as put forth in his Synopsis of Metaphysics, bears a striking similarity to that of John Locke. In particular, Hutcheson and Locke both have at the centre of their theories the notion of ideas as representational entities acting as the direct objects of all of our perceptions. On first consideration, one might find this similarity wholly unremarkable, given the popularity of Locke's Essay. But the Essay was published in 1689 and the Synopsis in 1742, and (...)
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  31. I Think Something That You Do Not Think, and That is Red. John Locke and George Berkeley Over Abstract Ideas and Kant's Logical Abstractionism.Alexander Aichele - 2012 - Kant-Studien 103 (1):25-46.
  32. Berkeley's Lasting Legacy: 300 Years Later.Timo Airaksinen & Bertil Belfrage (eds.) - 2011 - Cambridge Scholars Press.
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  33. Berkeley E Mandeville: Religião E Moralidade.Antonio Carlos dos Santos - 2011 - Filosofia Unisinos 12 (1):56-69.
  34. John Scottus Eriugena on the Composition of Material Bodies.Darren Hibbs - 2011 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (3):385 - 393.
    This paper examines John Scottus Eriugena's account of material bodies. Some scholars have argued that Eriugena's account prefigures Berkeleyan idealism. The interpretation offered in the paper rejects the Berkeleyan interpretation on the grounds that Eriugena, unlike Berkeley, did not propose a thoroughly immaterialist view of reality.
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  35. The Main Part and Pillar of Berkeley's Theory: Idealism and Perceptual Heterogeneity.Thomas M. Lennon - 2011 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 49 (2):91-115.
    Berkeley subscribed to the principle of heterogeneity, that what we see is qualitatively and numerically different from what we touch. He says of this principle that it is “the main part and pillar of [his] theory.” The argument I present here is that the theory to which Berkeley refers is not just his theory of vision, but what that theory was the preparation for, which is nothing less than his idealism. The argument turns on the passivity of perception, which is (...)
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  36. Qualities and Simple Ideas: Hume and His Debt to Berkeley.Alan Nelson & David Landy - 2011 - In Lawrence Nolan (ed.), Primary and Secondary Qualities: The Historical and Ongoing Debate. Oxford University Press. pp. 216-238.
  37. On Certainty, Skepticism and Berkeley's Idealism.Tero Vaaja - 2011 - SATS 12 (2):253-265.
    In this paper, I survey the way Wittgenstein reacts to radical philosophical doubt in his On Certainty.He deems skeptical doubt in some important cases idle, pointless or otherwise negligible. I point out that several passages of On Certainty make it difficult to judge whether Wittgenstein intends to address a skeptic or a metaphysical idealist. Drawing attention to the anti-skeptical nature of Berkeley’s idealism, I go on to argue that the question is far from trivial: rather, it affects the way we (...)
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  38. Berkeley, Spinoza, and the Radical Enlightenment.Genevieve Brykman - 2010 - In Silvia Parigi (ed.), George Berkeley: Religion and Science in the Age of Enlightenment. Springer.
  39. Locke, Berkeley, and Hume as Philosophers of Money.George C. Caffentzis - 2010 - In Silvia Parigi (ed.), George Berkeley: Religion and Science in the Age of Enlightenment. Springer.
    For the last 30 years I have been writing a trilogy on Locke’s, Berkeley’s, and Hume’s philosophies of money. With the publication of Clipped Coins. Abused Words and Civil Government; John Locke’s Philosophy of Money and Exciting the Industry of Mankind; George Berkeley’s Philosophy of Money and with the last volume on Hume in preparation, the trilogy is now almost completed.
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  40. Berkeley and Spinoza.Stephen H. Daniel - 2010 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 135 (1):123-134.
    There is a widespread assumption that Berkeley and Spinoza have little in common, even though early Jesuit critics in France often linked them. Later commentators have also recognized their similarities. My essay focuses on how Berkeley 's comments on the Arnauld-Malebranche debate regarding objective and formal reality and his treatment of god's creation of finite minds within the order of nature relate his theory of knowledge to his doctrine in a way similar to that of Spinoza. On estime souvent que (...)
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  41. Scepticism and its Refutation in George Berkeley's and Thomas Reid's Philosophies (Sceptycyzm I Dyskusja Z Nim W Filozofii George'a Berkeleya I Thomasa Reida).Kucharski Dariusz - 2010 - Studia Philosophiae Christianae 46 (2).
  42. « Reid Said the Business, but Berkeley Did It. » Ferrier Interprète de L'Immatérialisme.Laurent Jaffro - 2010 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 135 (1):135 - 149.
    L'article expose et discute l'interprétation de l'immatérialisme de Berkeley par James Frederick Ferrier. Dans deux articles denses (1842, 1847), contre l'historiographie reidienne dominante, celui-ci rejette la thèse selon laquelle Berkeley souscrit à la méthode des idées et par là aux principes élémentaires du représentationnalisme. Loin de défendre l'idéalisme subjectif, Berkeley adhère à une forme de réalisme direct. Dans les Institutes of Metaphysic (1854), Ferrier va plus loin et se sert du « maître argument » de Berkeley pour risquer ses propres (...)
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  43. « Reid said the business, but Berkeley did it. ».Laurent Jaffro - 2010 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 135 (1):135-149.
    L’article expose et discute l’interprétation de l’immatérialisme de Berkeley par James Frederick Ferrier. Dans deux articles denses , contre l’historiographie reidienne dominante, celui-ci rejette la thèse selon laquelle Berkeley souscrit à la méthode des idées et par là aux principes élémentaires du représentationnalisme. Loin de défendre l’idéalisme subjectif, Berkeley adhère à une forme de réalisme direct. Dans les Institutes of Metaphysic , Ferrier va plus loin et se sert du « maître argument » de Berkeley pour risquer ses propres thèses (...)
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  44. Causation, Fictionalism, and Non-Cognitivism: Berkeley and Hume.P. J. E. Kail - 2010 - In Silvia Parigi (ed.), George Berkeley: Religion and Science in the Age of Enlightenment. Springer.
  45. Mandeville dans l''Alciphron'.Eléonore Le Jallé - 2010 - In Laurent Jaffro, Genevieve Brykman & Claire Schwartz (eds.), Berkeley's Alciphron: English Text and Essays in Interpretation. Georg Olms Verlag.
  46. Was Berkeley a Spinozist? A Historiographical Answer (1718-1751).Caterina Menichelli - 2010 - In Silvia Parigi (ed.), George Berkeley: Religion and Science in the Age of Enlightenment. Springer.
  47. Siris and the Renaissance: Some Overlooked Berkeleian Sources.Silvia Parigi - 2010 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 135 (1):151.
    This essay deals with a quite unexplored topic : Berkeley's sources from Renaissance. In fact, while the relationships between Berkeley and the most well-known modern philosophers (as Descartes, Malebranche, Locke and Hume) have been widely analysed, the importance of Berkeley's classical learning and erudition for the development of his own philosophical thought has usually been overlooked. After some general considerations, I focus on two topics : ether and tar-water in Siris. Cet essai traite un sujet très peu exploré : les (...)
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  48. George Berkeley e a tradição platônica.Costica Bradatan & Jaimir Conte - 2009 - Princípios 16 (26):257-284.
    Existe já uma grande quantidade de literatura dedicada à presença na filosofia inicial de Berkeley de alguns assuntos tipicamente platônicos (arquétipos, o problema da mente de Deus, a relaçáo entre ideias e coisas, etc.). Baseados em alguns desses escritos, nas próprias palavras de Berkeley, assim como no exame de alguns elementos da tradiçáo platônica num amplo sentido, sugiro que, longe de serem apenas tópicos isolados, livremente espalhados nos primeiros escritos de Berkeley, eles formam uma perfeita rede de aspectos, atitudes e (...)
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  49. Berkeley and Campailla: Unsuccessful Meeting or Probable Influence?Sebastien Charles - 2009 - Giornale Critico Della Filosofia Italiana 5 (1):25-40.
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  50. On the Possibility of Pre-Cartesian Idealism.Darren Hibbs - 2009 - Dialogue 48 (3):643.
    ABSTRACT: In a seminal article on the origin of philosophical idealism in the western philosophical tradition, Myles Burnyeat argued that idealism could not have come about prior to Descartes. According to Burnyeat, Descartes introduced a radical version of external world scepticism which made it possible for subsequent philosophers to argue that reality is composed exclusively of immaterial minds and their contents. I argue that the success of Burnyeatidealisms definitions of the term does not rule out the possibility of Pre-Cartesian idealism.
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