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  1. Berkeley, Archetypes, and Errors.Fred Ablondi - 2005 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 43 (4):493-504.
  2. Berkeley and Epistemology.Robert Merrihew Adams - 1987 - In Ernest Sosa (ed.), Essays on the Philosophy of George Berkeley. D. Reidel.
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  3. Bergson, Berkeley, and Philosophical Intuition.A. C. Armstrong - 1914 - Philosophical Review 23 (4):430-438.
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  4. Was Berkeley an Empiricist or a Rationalist?Michael Ayers - 2005 - In Kenneth Winkler (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Berkeley. Cambridge University Press. pp. 34.
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  5. Molyneux's Question and the Berkeleian Answer.Peter Baumann - 2011 - In Jean Paul Margot & Mauricio Zuluaga (eds.), Jean Paul Margot & Mauricio Zuluaga (eds.), Perspectivas de la Modernidad. Siglos XVI, XVII y XVIII. Colección Artes y Humanidades. pp. 217-234.
    Amongst those who answered Molyneux’s question in the negative or at least not in the positive, George Berkeley is of particular interest because he argued for a very radical position. Most of his contribution to the discussion can be found in his Essay towards a New Theory of Vision. I will give an exposition of his view (2) and then move on to a critical discussion of this kind of view, - what one could call the “Berkeleian view” (3). I (...)
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  6. If We Stop Thinking About Berkeley's Problem of Continuity, Will It Still Exist?S. Seth Bordner - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (2):237-260.
    every beginning philosophy student learns that Berkeley denies the existence of matter and holds instead that the existence of sensible objects consists in being perceived.1 She also learns that Berkeley holds that sensible objects exist continuously, even when no finite mind perceives them, since God always perceives them.Berkeley seems to say so explicitly in the Third Dialogue: When I deny sensible things an existence out of the mind, I do not mean my mind in particular, but all minds. Now it (...)
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  7. Le modèle visuel de la connaissance chez Berkeley.Geneviève Brykman - 1983 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 173 (4):427 - 441.
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  8. A Straightforward Solution to Berkeley's Puzzle.John Campbell - 2012 - The Harvard Review of Philosophy 18 (1):31-49.
  9. Chapter 7. Kant’s Critique of Berkeley’s Concept of Objectivity.Dina Emundts - 2008 - In Béatrice Longuenesse & Daniel Garber (eds.), Kant and the Early Moderns. Princeton University Press. pp. 117-141.
  10. Berkeley's Epistemic Ontology : The Three Dialogues.Daniel Flage - 2008 - In Stephen H. Daniel (ed.), New Interpretations of Berkeley's Thought. Humanity Books.
  11. Berkeley's Epistemic Ontology: The Principles.Daniel E. Flage - 2004 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 34 (1):25 - 60.
  12. Berkeley and Buber: An Epistemological Comparison.David S. Forth - 1971 - Dialogue 10 (4):690-707.
  13. Pragmatism: The Unformulated Method of Bishop Berkeley.Lesley Friedman - 2003 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 41 (1):81-96.
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  14. Transparency of Mind: The Contributions of Descartes, Leibniz, and Berkeley to the Genesis of the Modern Subject.Gary Hatfield - 2011 - In Hubertus Busche (ed.), Departure for Modern Europe: A Handbook of Early Modern Philosophy (1400-1700). Felix Meiner Verlag. pp. 361–375.
    The chapter focuses on attributions of the transparency of thought to early modern figures, most notably Descartes. Many recent philosophers assume that Descartes believed the mind to be “transparent”: since all mental states are conscious, we are therefore aware of them all, and indeed incorrigibly know them all. Descartes, and Berkeley too, do make statements that seem to endorse both aspects of the transparency theses (awareness of all mental states; incorrigibility). However, they also make systematic theoretical statements that directly countenance (...)
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  15. Berkeley on Inconceivability and Impossibility.Thomas Holden - forthcoming - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research.
    Contrary to a popular reading of his modal epistemology, Berkeley does not hold that inconceivability entails impossibility, and he cannot therefore argue the impossibility of mind-independent matter by appealing to facts about what we cannot conceive. Berkeley is explicit about this constraint on his metaphysical argumentation, and, I argue, does respect it in practice. Popular mythology about the ‘master argument’ notwithstanding, the only passages in which he might plausibly seem to employ the principle that inconceivability entails impossibility are those that (...)
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  16. Berkeley's Idealism: Critique of John Locke's Epistemology.M. A. Kanu - 2007 - Sophia: An African Journal of Philosophy 7 (2).
  17. Epistemology and Ontology In Kant's Critique of Berkeley.Ted Kinnaman - 2002 - Idealistic Studies 32 (3):203-220.
    Despite apparent similarities between them, in the Prolegomena to Any Future Metaphysics and in the second edition of the Critique of Pure Reason Kant makes several attempts to distinguish his idealism from Berkeley ’s. I argue that Kant ’s arguments in three of the four places where he explicitly distances himself from Berkeley are insufficient to their task because they attack only Berkeley ’s empiricism rather than his immaterialism. Although a close reading of the Refutation of Idealism lies beyond the (...)
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  18. Epistemology and Ontology In Kant’s Critique of Berkeley.Ted Kinnaman - 2002 - Idealistic Studies 32 (3):203-220.
    Despite apparent similarities between them, in the Prolegomena to Any Future Metaphysics and in the second edition of the Critique of Pure Reason Kant makes several attempts to distinguish his idealism from Berkeley’s. I argue that Kant’s arguments in three of the four places where he explicitly distances himself from Berkeley are insufficient to their task because they attack only Berkeley’s empiricism rather than his immaterialism. Although a close reading of the Refutation of Idealism lies beyond the scope of this (...)
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  19. Le Problème de la raison chez Berkeley.André Moreau - 1966 - Dialogue 5 (2):154-183.
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  20. Kant and Dogmatic Idealism: A Defense of Kant's Refutation of Berkeley.Vance G. Morgan - 1993 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 31 (2):217-237.
  21. Berkeley's Ontology and the Epistemology of Idealism.Robert Muehlmann - 1978 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 8 (1):89 - 111.
  22. Berkeley's Onotolgy and the Epistemology of Idealism.Robert Muehlmann - 1978 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 8 (1):89-111.
  23. Berkeley's Positive Epistemology.George S. Pappas - 2011 - Philosophical Inquiry 35 (3-4):23-35.
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  24. Berkeley's Assessment of Locke's Epistemology.George S. Pappas - 2007 - In Stephen H. Daniel (ed.), Philosophica.
    In this essay, the author analyses Berkeley’s conformity and inference argument against Locke’s theory of percep tion. Both arguments are not as decisive as traditionally has been perceived and fail to engage in Locke’s actual position. The main reason for this is that Berkeley does not see that Locke’s position is compatible with the non-inferential nature of perceptual knowledge.
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  25. Review: Sébastien Charles, Ed. Science Et Épistémologie Selon Berkeley. [REVIEW]Luc Peterschmitt - 2007 - Berkeley Studies:32-35.
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  26. Readings in Epistemology: From Aquinas, Bacon, Galileo, Descartes, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, Kant.Vincent G. Potter (ed.) - 1993 - Fordham University Press.
    A companion volume to On Understanding Understanding, this second edition incorporates corrections to the previous text and includes new readings. The works collected in this volume are mainly from the British Empiricists. The breadth of the selection is not so diverse that the pieces cannot be readily understood by a newcomer to Epistemology, they have a logical progression of development (from Locke to Berkeley to Hume), and all of the philosophers whose work is represented have had great influence on contemporary (...)
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  27. The Treatment of Christian Doctrine by Philosophers of the Natural Light From Descartes to Berkeley.William H. Trapnell - 1988 - Voltaire Foundation.
  28. Berkeley Reason and Experience.Godfrey Norman Agmondisham Vesey - 1982
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  29. The Critique of Berkeley's Empiricism In Orwell's 1984.Peter S. Wenz - 1986 - Idealistic Studies 16 (2):133-152.
  30. "Clos'd by Your Senses Five": William Blake's Early Illuminated Prophecies and Berkeleian Epistemology.Vincent Miller Whitman - 2002 - Dissertation, The University of Connecticut
    This study uses the key terms of Berkeleian epistemology as a framework for understanding Blake's early prophetic works. As a foil, Berkeley highlights the importance of epistemology to Blake and makes clear that the fundamental characteristic of the Fall for Blake is the mistaken assumption that sensory perceptions are effects of an external spiritual cause. ;Most importantly: "Independence" denotes Berkeley's tenet that the existence of a "real thing" or physical object is constantly maintained by God regardless of whether any human (...)
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