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  1. Sobre la ontología inmaterialista: el concepto de idea en Berkeley / On Immaterialist Ontology: Berkeley's Concept of Idea.Alberto Luis López - 2019 - Areté. Revista de Filosofía 2 (31):427-449.
    Berkeley’s immaterialist philosophy has been frequently underestimated as a result of the misunderstanding of his ontological proposal, specifically because of the complexity of his concept of idea. The aim of this paper is then to clarify and explain that concept because from it depends the correct understanding of Berkeley’s ontological and immaterialist proposal. To do this, 1) I will show some examples of the misunderstanding that the berkeleian proposal has had, mainly due to his concept of idea; 2) I will (...)
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  2. Reid and Berkeley on Scepticism, Representationalism, and Ideas.Peter West - 2019 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 17 (3):191-210.
    Both Reid and Berkeley reject ‘representationalism’, an epistemological position whereby we perceive things in the world indirectly via ideas in our mind, on the grounds of anti-scepticism and common sense. My aim in this paper is to draw out the similarities between Reid and Berkeley's ‘anti-representationalist’ arguments, whilst also identifying the root of their disagreements on certain fundamental metaphysical issues. Reid famously rejects Berkeley's idealism, in which all that exists are ideas and minds, because it undermines the dictates of common (...)
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  3. Berkeley and Locke.Patrick J. Connolly - forthcoming - In Samuel C. Rickless (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Berkeley. Oxford University Press.
    This chapter revisits three key disagreements between Locke and Berkeley. The disagreements relate to abstraction, the idea of substance, and the status of the primary/secondary quality distinction. The goal of the chapter is to show that these disagreements are rooted in a more fundamental disagreement over the nature of ideas. For Berkeley, ideas are tied very closely to perceptual content. Locke adopts a less restrictive account of the nature of ideas. On his view, ideas are responsible for both perceptual content (...)
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  4. The New Berkeley.Marc Hight And Walter Ott - 2004 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 34 (1):1-24.
    Throughout his mature writings, Berkeley speaks of minds as substances that underlie or support ideas. After initially flirting with a Humean account, according to which minds are nothing but ‘congeries of Perceptions’, Berkeley went on to claim that a mind is a ‘perceiving, active being... entirely distinct’ from its ideas. Despite his immaterialism, Berkeley retains the traditional category of substance and gives it pride of place in his ontology. Ideas, by contrast, are ‘fleeting and dependent beings’ that must be supported (...)
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  5. Particles and Ideas: Bishop Berkeley's Corpuscularian Philosophy. Gabriel Moked.Lorne Falkenstein - 1991 - Philosophy of Science 58 (1):133-135.
  6. Berkeley and the Passivity of Ideas.Richard Brook - 2017 - Iyyun 66:59-74.
    A number of early modern philosophers deny that corporeal non-minded nature contains efficient or strict causes. For Berkeley the passivity of ideas (hence PI) expresses this view. My aim is to look at two possible arguments – I call them strategy 1, and strategy 2 – Berkeley makes, or others make in his behalf, for PI. I conclude that they are unsatisfactory. I’m particularly interested whether Berkeley’s distinctive doctrine that objects of sense are mind-dependent, i.e., that no corporeal object can (...)
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  7. Berkeley and Imagination.Robin Attfield - 1970 - Philosophy 45 (173):237 - 239.
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  8. Introducción Al Concepto de Idea En la Filosofía de George Berkeley.Francesco Consiglio - 2016 - Disputatio. Philosophical Research Bulletin 5 (6):283--296.
    [ES] El objetivo de este artículo es el de ofrecer una introducción práctica y esquemática al concepto de idea en la filosofía de George Berkeley. Es éste un punto teórico central en la especulación del filósofo irlandés, imprescindible para la comprensión de sus aportaciones peculiares a la tradición empirista moderna. A través de un análisis de la evolución del concepto de idea en las tres obras mayores de este filósofo, trataré de delinear los rasgos característicos y el recorrido evolutivo de (...)
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  9. Kant and Dogmatic Idealism: A Defense of Kant’s Refutation of Berkeley.Vance G. Morgan - 1993 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 31 (2):217-237.
  10. Will, Ideas and Perception in Berkeley’s God.Craig Lehman - 1981 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 19 (2):197-203.
  11. Notions and Ideas in Berkeley’s Philosophy.Ian Thomas Ramsey - 1953 - Proceedings of the XIth International Congress of Philosophy 13:66-71.
  12. Abstract Ideas and Meaning in Berkeley and Hume.Donald Gotterbarn - 1975 - Proceedings of the XVth World Congress of Philosophy 5:701-705.
  13. An Alleged Incoherence in Berkeley's Philosophy.Reinaldo Elugardo - 1978 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 8 (sup1):177-189.
  14. Berkeley: Perception, Conception, and Indexical Thought.Theodore Michael Daniel Cooke - 1998 - Dissertation, Marquette University
    The doctrine of matter, mind/body interaction, the primary/secondary quality distinction, the doctrine of absolute time: these are just some of the tenets of early modern philosophy that are vigorously attacked by George Berkeley , the Anglo-Irish bishop and philosopher who offered his own theory of immaterialism to replace the problematic dualistic philosophies of his day. In this study it is argued that Berkeley's rejection of abstract ideas underscores his strongest attacks on all of these tenets. The first five chapters give (...)
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  15. A Critical Examination of Berkeley's Doctrine of Ideas and its Role in His Philosophy.Samuel Lamartine Varnedoe - 1966 - Dissertation, University of Pennsylvania
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  16. Abstraction and the 'Esse' is 'Percipi' Thesis.David William Drebushenko - 1987 - Dissertation, The Ohio State University
    The dissertation is divided into two parts. In Part One, Locke's theory of abstract general ideas is introduced and it is explained how it is to be used in giving an account of how certain common nouns refer. In the second chapter, Berkeley's attack on the theory of abstract ideas is described. In the third chapter, a defense of the doctrine proposed by J. L. Mackie is considered. It is argued that this fails as it stands, but the chapter goes (...)
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  17. The Problem of Divine Ideas in Eighteenth-Century Immaterialism: A Comparative Study of the Philosophies of George Berkeley, Samuel Johnson, Arthur Collier, and Jonathan Edwards.Bruce Allen Freeberg - 1999 - Dissertation, Emory University
    Immaterialism is typically associated with George Berkeley, but Berkeley's philosophy is one of four distinct versions of immaterialism that developed in the early eighteenth century. To the extent that attention has been given to the lesser known proponents of immaterialism, the basic differences in their views have not been adequately explicated and appreciated. I show that one of the most important differences between the several proponents of immaterialism is found in their different approaches to the problem of divine ideas, the (...)
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  18. George Berkeley's Attack on the Doctrine of Abstract Ideas.Peter Samuel Wenz - 1971 - Dissertation, The University of Wisconsin - Madison
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  19. On A. A. Luce's Berkeley's Existence in the Mind.J. C. Gregory - 1942 - Mind 51:198.
  20. Can Berkeley Be Called an Imagist?A. Kasem - 1989 - Indian Philosophical Quarterly 16 (1):75.
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  21. Species, Ideas and Idealism: The Scholastic and Cartesian Background of Berkeley's Master Argument.David Lee Clemenson - 2001 - Dissertation, Rice University
    This dissertation situates Berkeley's "master argument" for idealism in the context of Descartes' theory of ideas, and seeks to show that within that context the argument is convincing. In addition, the dissertation argues that Descartes' theory of ideas was not representationalist., as is often supposed, but a kind of direct realism; Cartesian ideas render intelligible individuals directly present to the intellect. In this respect Cartesian idea theory is very similar to a theory of species expounded by Antonio Rubio and other (...)
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  22. Berkeley: Ideas, Immaterialism, and Objective Presence. [REVIEW]Melissa Frankel - 2012 - Berkeley Studies 23:46-50.
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  23. Notions: The Counter-Poise of the Berkeleyan Ideas.Desirée Park - 1981 - Giornale di Metafisica. Nuova Serie Torino 3 (2):243-265.
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  24. "To stand for " et "to represent" dans l'introduction manuscrite de Berkeley.Dominique Berlioz Letellier - 1986 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 3:331-338.
  25. I Think Something That You Do Not Think, and That is Red. John Locke and George Berkeley Over Abstract Ideas and Kant's Logical Abstractionism.Alexander Aichele - 2012 - Kant-Studien 103 (1):25-46.
  26. La muralla del sujeto: Percepción y lenguaje en Berkeley.Alejandro Vázquez Ortiz - 2008 - A Parte Rei 58:3.
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  27. Perception, idée, objet, chose chez G. Berkeley.Martial Gueroult - 1953 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 143:181 - 200.
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  28. Semiotyka sensualizmu immanentnego. Idea, pojęcie i słowo w filozofii Berkeley\'a'.Jerzy Kopania - 1990 - Idea 3 (3):45-68.
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  29. Is Berkeley's Theory of Ideas A Variant of Locke's?Teppei Baba - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 16:9-15.
    I try to show that Berkeley's theory of ideas is not a variant of Locke's. We can find such an interpretation of Berkeley in Thomas Reid. So, we could call this interpretation a 'traditional interpretation'. This traditional interpretation has an influence still now, for example, Tomida interprets Berkeley in this line (Tomida2002). We will see that this traditional interpretation gives a serious problem to Berkeley (section 1). And I am going to present an argument against this traditional interpretation (section 2).
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  30. O triângulo geral de Locke e a consideração parcial de Berkeley.Bento Prado Neto - 2005 - Doispontos 1 (2).
    São variadas as interpretações da crítica berkeleyana às idéias abstratas, mas elas costumam concordar na tese de que essa crítica gira em torno da natureza das “idéias”. Isto é, se “idéia” for o mesmo que “imagem”, então a abstração lockeana é impossível, caso contrário, não. Neste artigo eu procuro mostrar que essa crítica não depende de idéia ser ou não uma imagem e que Locke está parcialmente consciente do problema levantado por Berkeley. Locke's general triangle and Berkeley's partial considerationThere are (...)
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  31. The Relation Between Anti-Abstractionism and Idealism in Berkeley's Metaphysics.Samuel C. Rickless - 2012 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (4):723-740.
    George Berkeley maintains both anti-abstractionism (that abstract ideas are impossible) and idealism (that physical objects and their qualities are mind-dependent). Some scholars (including Atherton, Bolton, and Pappas) have argued, in different ways, that Berkeley uses anti-abstractionism as a premise in a simple argument for idealism. In this paper, I argue that the relation between anti-abstractionism and idealism in Berkeley's metaphysics is more complex than these scholars acknowledge. Berkeley distinguishes between two kinds of abstraction, singling abstraction and generalizing abstraction. He then (...)
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  32. Berkeley's Imagination.Ian Tipton - 1987 - In Ernest Sosa (ed.), Essays on the Philosophy of George Berkeley. D. Reidel.
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  33. Berkeley's Objection to Abstract Ideas and Unconceived Objects.Martha Brandt Bolton - 1987 - In Ernest Sosa (ed.), Essays on the Philosophy of George Berkeley. D. Reidel.
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  34. Berkeley's Anti-Abstractionism.Margaret Atherton - 1987 - In Ernest Sosa (ed.), Essays on the Philosophy of George Berkeley. D. Reidel.
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  35. Berkeley, Ideas, and Idealism.Michael R. Ayers - 2007 - In Stephen H. Daniel (ed.), Reexamining Berkeley's Philosophy.
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  36. Berkeley and Others on the Problem of Universals.Joseph Margolis - 1982 - In Colin M. Turbayne (ed.), Berkeley: Critical and Interpretive Essays.
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  37. On Taking Ideas Seriously.Desiree Park - 1982 - In Colin M. Turbayne (ed.), Berkeley: Critical and Interpretive Essays.
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  38. Innate Ideas Without Abstract Ideas: An Essay on Berkeley's Platonism.John Russell Roberts - manuscript
    Draft. Berkeley denied the existence of abstract ideas and any faculty of abstraction. At the same time, however, he embraced innate ideas and a faculty of pure intellect. This paper attempts to reconcile the tension between these commitments by offering an interpretation of Berkeley's Platonism.
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  39. Berkeley and the Perception of Ideas.Douglas Odegard - 1971 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 1 (2):155 - 171.
    It is important to try to understand Berkeley's exact position on what it is for someone to perceive an idea. He is frequently presented as holding that to perceive an idea is to be confronted by an object which is in some sense mind-dependent and private, and, if taken in a certain way, such a remark is not inaccurate. But the interpretation which renders it accurate needs to be specified and this is a task which awaits completion. Until it is (...)
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  40. Minds and Ideas in Berkeley.George Pitcher - 1969 - American Philosophical Quarterly 6 (3):198 - 207.
    Berkeley asserts that (a) the mind perceives ideas, (b) the mind is wholly distinct from its ideas, and (c) the alleged distinction between (i) the perceiving of an idea and (ii) the idea perceived, is a bogus one. in this paper, the author does the following. first, he gives textual justification for his claim that berkeley did in fact hold each of the theses (a)-(c). he then shows that (a), (b), and (c) together constitute an inconsistent triad of propositions. then (...)
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  41. Berkeley and the Causality of Ideas; a Look at PHK 25.Richard Brook - manuscript
    I argue that Berkeley's distinctive idealism/immaterialism can't support his view that objects of sense, immediately or mediately perceived, are causally inert. (The Passivity of Ideas thesis or PI) Neither appeal to ordinary perception, nor traditional arguments, for example, that causal connections are necessary, and we can't perceive such connections, are helpful. More likely it is theological concerns,e.g., how to have second causes if God upholds by continuously creating the world, that's in the background. This puts Berkeley closer to Malebranche than (...)
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  42. 'Abstraction and Representation in Locke, Berkeley and Hume'.Alexander Stewart - unknown
  43. Berkeley, Resemblance, and Sensible Things.John Carriero - 2003 - Philosophical Topics 31 (1/2):21-46.
  44. Berkeley's Missing Argument: The Sceptical Attack on Intentionality.Jonathan Hill - 2011 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (1):47-77.
    Berkeley argues that our ideas cannot represent external objects, because only an idea can resemble an idea. But he does not offer any argument for the claim that an idea can represent only what it resembles - a premise essential to his argument. I argue that this gap can be both historically explained and filled by examining the debates between Cartesians and sceptics in the late seventeenth century. Descartes held that representation involves two relations between an idea and its object (...)
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  45. Berkeley on the Act-Object Distinction.Thomas M. Lennon - 2001 - Dialogue 40 (4):651-.
    RÉSUMÉ: Moore attribuait l’idéalisme de Berkeley à sa négligence de la distinction entre l’acte d’appréhension et son objet. Bien que Berkeley ait justement tracé cette distinction dans le premier Dialogue, et l’ait rejetée, peu s’en sont aperçu, et ceux qui l’ont remarqué lui reprochent habituellement de confondre l’acte d’appréhension avec une action. La thèse ici développée est que Berkeley n’est pas coupable de cette confusion et qu’il rejette la distinction, en fait, pour de bonnes raisons à caractère empiriste, qui ont (...)
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  46. An Similes Apud Deum Et Percipientem Ideae Dici Possint (Commentaire de David Raynor, “Berkeley's Ontology”).François Duchesneau - 1987 - Dialogue 26 (4):621-.
  47. Berkeley on General Ideas.Rolf Gruner - 1969 - Dialogue 8 (3):481-485.
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  48. Gruner on Berkeley on General Ideas.Kenneth Barber - 1971 - Dialogue 10 (2):337-341.
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  49. Berkeley on the Impossibility of Abstracting Primary From Secondary Qualities: Lockean Rejoinders.Georges Dicker - 2001 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 39 (1):23-45.
  50. Berkeley's Argument Against Abstract Ideas.Willis Doney - 1983 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 8 (1):295-308.
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