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  1. added 2020-05-02
    Berkeley’s Causal Thesis.John Immerwahr - 1974 - New Scholasticism 48 (2):153-170.
  2. added 2020-05-01
    Berkeley y la sustancia espiritual / Berkeley and the Spiritual Substance.Alberto Luis López - 2018 - In Laura Benítez Grobet & Luis Ramos-Alarcón Marcín (eds.), El concepto de substancia de Spinoza a Hegel. Mexico City, CDMX, Mexico: pp. 211-232.
    In this paper I have the purpose to analyze George Berkeley’s concept of substance. For this goal, it will be necessary first to track the manner that Berkeley was conceiving that concept, that is, how it was determining in his early philosophy and what kind of role had in it. To make this it must be necessary to review the early notes knowing in Spanish as Philosophical Commentaries; and subsequently it will be required to retake the published work, particularly the (...)
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  3. added 2019-11-25
    Berkeley on Causation, Ideas, and Necessary Connections.Sebastian Bender - 2020 - In Dominik Perler & Sebastian Bender (eds.), Causation and Cognition in Early Modern Philosophy. New York City, New York, USA: pp. 295-316.
    On Berkeley’s immaterialist ontology, there are only two kinds of created entities: finite spirits and ideas. Ideas are passive, and so there is no genuine idea-idea causation. Finite spirits, by contrast, are truly causally active on Berkeley’s view, in that they can produce ideas through their volitional activity. Some commentators have argued that this account of causation is inconsistent. On their view, the unequal treatment of spirits and ideas is unfounded, for all that can be observed in either case are (...)
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  4. added 2019-08-18
    Substance and Person: Berkeley on Descartes and Locke.Stephen H. Daniel - 2018 - Ruch Filozoficzny 74 (4):7.
    In his post-1720 works, Berkeley focuses his comments about Descartes on mechanism and about Locke on general abstract ideas. He warns against using metaphysical principles to explain observed regularities, and he extends his account to include spiritual substances (including God). Indeed, by calling a substance a spirit, he emphasizes how a person is simply the will that ideas be differentiated and associated in a certain way, not some <i>thing</i> that engages in differentiation. In this sense, a substance cannot be conceived (...)
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  5. added 2019-06-06
    Peirce on Berkeley’s Nominalistic Platonism.Douglas R. Anderson & Peter S. Groff - 1998 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 72 (2):165-177.
  6. added 2019-06-06
    Berkeley’s Conception of God From the Standpoint of Perception and Causation.James A. Elbert - 1934 - New Scholasticism 8 (2):152-158.
  7. added 2019-06-06
    The Place of God in Berkeley's Philosophy.J. D. Mabbott - 1931 - Journal of Philosophical Studies 6 (21):18-29.
    Berkeley is commonly regarded as an idealist whose system is saved from subjectivism only by the advent of a God more violently ex machina than the God of any other philosopher. I hope to show that this accusation rests on a misunderstanding of his central theory, a misunderstanding which gives God a place both inconsistent with his main premisses and useless in his system. I hope also to display by quotation the real Berkeley, whose theory of God's place and nature (...)
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  8. added 2019-06-06
    III.—Notes on Berkeley's Doctrine of Esse.C. Lloyd Morgan - 1914 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 15 (1):100-139.
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  9. added 2019-04-29
    Berkeley on Voluntary Motion: A Conservationist Account.Takaharu Oda - 2018 - Ruch Filozoficzny 74 (4):71–98.
    A plausible reading of Berkeley’s view of voluntary motion is occasionalism; this, however, leads to a specious conclusion against his argument of human action. Differing from an unqualified occasionalist reading, I consider the alternative reading that Berkeley is a conservationist regarding bodily motion by the human mind at will. That is, finite minds (spirits) immediately cause motions in their body parts, albeit under the divine conservation. My argument then comports with the conservationist reading from three perspectives: (i) theodicy that the (...)
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  10. added 2018-03-14
    Berkeley on Continuous Creation: Occasionalism Contained.Sukjae Lee - 2018 - In Stefan Storrie (ed.), Berkeley's Three Dialogues: New Essays. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 106-122.
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  11. added 2018-02-17
    Berkeley’s Metaphysics: Structural, Interpretive and Critical Essays. [REVIEW]Jody L. Graham - 1998 - Dialogue 37 (2):411-413.
    This collection of fourteen essays, dedicated to Edwin B. Allaire, is the result of a conference on Berkeley’s Metaphysics held at the University of Western Ontario in March 1992. The collection includes some of the critical commentaries, but most of these commentaries are contributions in their own right and are well worth reading.
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  12. added 2017-10-03
    Universality Without Universals: A Deleted Argument From Berkeley's Introduction to the "Principles".M. W. Beal - 1973 - Modern Schoolman 50 (3):301-310.
  13. added 2017-09-25
    A Mystery at the Heart of Berkeley's Philosophy.John Russell Roberts - 2010 - Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy:214-46.
    There is a problem regarding God and perception right at the heart of Berkeley ’s metaphysics. With respect to this problem, I will argue for : It is intractable. Berkeley has no solution to this problem, and neither can we hope to offer one on his behalf. However, I will also argue for : The truth of need not be seen as threatening the viability of Berkeley ’s metaphysics. In fact, it may even be seen as speaking in its favor.
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  14. added 2017-09-04
    Berkeley on Inconceivability and Impossibility.Thomas Holden - 2005 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 98 (1):107-122.
    Contrary to a popular reading of his modal epistemology, Berkeley does not hold that inconceivability entails impossibility, and he cannot therefore argue the impossibility of mind-independent matter by appealing to facts about what we cannot conceive. Berkeley is explicit about this constraint on his metaphysical argumentation, and, I argue, does respect it in practice. Popular mythology about the ‘master argument’ notwithstanding, the only passages in which he might plausibly seem to employ the principle that inconceivability entails impossibility are those that (...)
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  15. added 2017-06-16
    Berkeley Et Les Métaphysiques de Son Temps.Jean-Christophe Bardout - 2008 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (1):119-139.
    : La contribution de Berkeley à l'histoire de la métaphysique n'a que rarement été étudiée par ses commentateurs français ou anglo-saxons. La présente étude se propose de revenir sur la définition berkeleyenne de la métaphysique, sur la place qu'elle occupe dans l'économie de sa pensée, et tente ainsi d'éclairer la contribution de Berkeley à l'histoire de la notion de métaphysique à l'époque moderne. Nous montrons que la critique berkeleyenne de la métaphysique n'empêche pas Berkeley de maintenir sa pertinence théorique, si (...)
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  16. added 2016-11-16
    Study Three. Berkeley's Metaphysics and Ramist Logic.Fred Wilson - 1999 - In The Logic and Methodology of Science in Early Modern Thought: Seven Studies. University of Toronto Press. pp. 262-289.
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  17. added 2016-05-05
    Identity and Immaterialism.G. J. Reid - 1984 - American Philosophical Quarterly 21 (4):367 - 370.
  18. added 2016-05-04
    The Issue of Causality in Locke's and Berkeley's Philosophies.Abbas Sheikh-sho'aei - unknown - Kheradnameh Sadra Quarterly 13.
    Locke believes in the existence of the corporeal substance arguing that qualities and attributes cannot be self-subsistent and, therefore, need such a substance to hang on. Nonetheless, Berkeley stresses that qualities even the so-called 'primary qualities.' are all the same species which depend on the mind of the perceiver. The external existence, Berkeley maintains, is no more than a collection of qualities that are imagained by the perceiver. Locke says that the origin of our perception is an external substance but (...)
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  19. added 2016-05-04
    Berkeley's Theory of Relations.Denis Hsin-an Tsai - 1982 - Dissertation, Saint Louis University
    This dissertation examines the problems of relations as worked out in Berkeley's philosophy. ;In chapter one, I deal with Berkeley's life and the intellectual background from which his conception of philosophy is conceived. For Berkeley, the function of philosophy is to teach human beings how to: regulate their conducts, and know God and their duty, so as to promote their happiness, become spiritual beings, and thus restore human dignity. The way of achieving these aims is to obtain human knowledge. In (...)
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  20. added 2016-05-04
    Berkeley's Concept of Existence.George J. Stack - 1976 - Modern Schoolman 53 (3):281-289.
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  21. added 2016-05-04
    Berkeley's Conception of Object.George J. Stack - 1967 - Modern Schoolman 45 (1):1-27.
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  22. added 2016-04-29
    Berkeley and Ryle: Some Comparisons: PHILOSOPHY.T. R. Miles - 1953 - Philosophy 28 (104):58-71.
    This paper is divided into two sections. The first aims at showing in a general way that the programme and methods of Berkeley and Professor Ryle are to a large extent similar. The second deals with one problem only. It is an attempt to provide interpretation and commentary on Berkeley's attack on “absolute existence” and on Ryle's attack on the view that there can be different “kinds of existence,” “kinds of status,” or a number of different “worlds.”.
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  23. added 2016-04-29
    Esse Est Percipi, with Particular Reference to Number.DeWitt H. Parker - 1945 - Journal of Philosophy 42 (11):281-291.
  24. added 2016-04-28
    The New Berkeley.Marc Hight & Walter Ott - 2004 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 34 (1):1 - 24.
    Throughout his mature writings, Berkeley speaks of minds as substances that underlie or support ideas. After initially flirting with a Humean account, according to which minds are nothing but ‘congeries of Perceptions’, Berkeley went on to claim that a mind is a ‘perceiving, active being … entirely distinct’ from its ideas. Despite his immaterialism, Berkeley retains the traditional category of substance and gives it pride of place in his ontology. Ideas, by contrast, are ‘fleeting and dependent beings’ that must be (...)
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  25. added 2016-04-26
    Remarks on Grandi’s Comments.Daniel E. Flage - 2009 - Philosophia 37 (3):379-380.
    This note is a reply to some of Giovanni Grandi’s comments on my paper “Berkeley’s Contingent Necessities.”.
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  26. added 2016-04-18
    Berkeley's Metaphysics: Structural, Interpretive, and Critical Essays.Robert Muehlmann (ed.) - 1995 - Pennsylvania State University Press.
    This collection of fourteen interpretative essays on the philosophy of George Berkeley focuses specifically on Berkeley’s theory of the nature and variety of existing things. The collection is notable for containing the first four winners of the Turbayne International Berkeley Essay Prize. The seven essays in the first part, entitled “Idealism,” attempt to illuminate Berkeley’s notorious thesis that to be is to be perceived, that the _esse_ of sensible things is _percipi._ Most of the essays in this first part are (...)
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  27. added 2015-08-07
    How Berkeley Redefines Substance.Stephen H. Daniel - 2013 - Berkeley Studies 24:40-50.
    In several essays I have argued that Berkeley maintains the same basic notion of spiritual substance throughout his life. Because that notion is not the traditional (Aristotelian, Cartesian, or Lockean) doctrine of substance, critics (e.g., John Roberts, Tom Stoneham, Talia Mae Bettcher, Margaret Atherton, Walter Ott, Marc Hight) claim that on my reading Berkeley either endorses a Humean notion of substance or has no recognizable theory of substance at all. In this essay I point out how my interpretation does not (...)
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  28. added 2015-08-07
    Stoicism in Berkeley's Philosophy.Stephen H. Daniel - 2011 - In Bertil Belfrage & Timo Airaksinen (eds.), Berkeley's Lasting Legacy: 300 Years Later. Cambridge Scholars Press. pp. 121-34.
    Commentators have not said much regarding Berkeley and Stoicism. Even when they do, they generally limit their remarks to Berkeley’s Siris (1744) where he invokes characteristically Stoic themes about the World Soul, “seminal reasons,” and the animating fire of the universe. The Stoic heritage of other Berkeleian doctrines (e.g., about mind or the semiotic character of nature) is seldom recognized, and when it is, little is made of it in explaining his other doctrines (e.g., immaterialism). None of this is surprising, (...)
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  29. added 2015-08-07
    The Harmony of the Leibniz-Berkeley Juxtaposition.Stephen H. Daniel - 2007 - In P. Phemister & S. Brown (eds.), Leibniz and the English-Speaking World. Springer. pp. 163--180.
  30. added 2015-03-02
    Paranormal Phenomena and Berkeley's Metaphysics.Peter B. Lloyd - 1999
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  31. added 2015-03-02
    The Metaphysics of George Berkeley, 1685-1753 Irish Philosopher.Temple Kingston - 1992
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  32. added 2015-02-02
    The Metaphysics of Berkeley Critically Examined in the Light of Modern Philosophy. [REVIEW]A. E. M. - 1936 - Journal of Philosophy 45 (15):526.
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  33. added 2014-06-11
    Mesta Panta Semeion. Plotinus, Leibniz and Berkeley on Determinism.Daniele Bertini - 2009 - In Panayiota Vassilopoulou & Stephen Clark (eds.), Late Antique Epistemology. Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Determinism is the view that any event is determined by previous events and the laws of nature. My claim is that Plotinus's, Leibniz's and Berkeley's rejection of determinism is structurally similar. Indeed, while determinism holds that phenomenal changes (ontologically) depend only on the way the laws of Nature apply to the previous conditions of the states of the world, the three philosophers all argues for the claim that the laws of Nature are not independent on the mind (the Hypostasis of (...)
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  34. added 2014-04-19
    Berkeley et le schématisme.Joseph Moreau - 1988 - Kant-Studien 79 (1-4):286-292.
  35. added 2014-04-02
    Berkeley's Unstable Ontology.Phillip D. Cummins - 1989 - Modern Schoolman 67 (1):15-32.
  36. added 2014-04-02
    Berkeley’s Quad: The Question of Numerical Identity.David Berman - 1986 - Idealistic Studies 16 (1):41-45.
    In two important articles Denis Grey has argued that Berkeley’s philosophy develops in “two incompatible ways.” Grey calls these the “limerick view” and the “strict interpretation”—which he thinks is feasible. In the first, he finds Berkeley arguing that.
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  37. added 2014-03-31
    Berkeley, Causality, and Signification.Richard Brook - 1995 - International Studies in Philosophy 27 (2):15-31.
  38. added 2014-03-28
    The Metaphysics of George Berkeley, 1685-1753.George S. Pappas - 1997 - International Studies in Philosophy 29 (4):126-127.
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  39. added 2014-03-21
    Berkeley, Suárez, and the Esse-Existere Distinction.Stephen H. Daniel - 2000 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 74 (4):621-636.
    For Berkeley, a thing's existence 'esse' is nothing more than its being perceived 'as that thing'. It makes no sense to ask (with Samuel Johnson) about the 'esse' of the mind or the specific act of perception, for that would be like asking what it means for existence to exist. Berkeley's "existere is percipi or percipere" (NB 429) thus carefully adopts the scholastic distinction between 'esse' and 'existere' ignored by Locke and others committed to a substantialist notion of mind. Following (...)
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  40. added 2014-03-09
    Comments on Daniel E. Flage’s “Berkeley’s Contingent Necessities”.Giovanni Battista Grandi - 2009 - Philosophia 37 (3):373-378.
    According to Daniel Flage, Berkeley thinks that all necessary truths are founded on acts of will that assign meanings to words. After briefly commenting on the air of paradox contained in the title of Flage’s paper, and on the historical accuracy of Berkeley’s understanding of the abstractionist tradition, I make some remarks on two points made by Flage. Firstly, I discuss Flage’s distinction between the ontological ground of a necessary truth and our knowledge of a necessary truth. Secondly, I discuss (...)
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  41. added 2014-03-09
    A Metaphysics for the Mob: The Philosophy of George Berkeley. [REVIEW]Samuel C. Rickless - 2009 - Philosophical Review 118 (2):244-247.
  42. added 2014-03-09
    Berkeley’s Contingent Necessities.Daniel E. Flage - 2009 - Philosophia 37 (3):361-372.
    The paper provides an account of necessary truths in Berkeley based upon his divine language model. If the thesis of the paper is correct, not all Berkeleian necessary truths can be known a priori.
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  43. added 2014-02-10
    The Influence of Berkeley's Science on His Metaphysics.C. M. Turbayne - 1955 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 16 (4):476-487.
  44. added 2013-09-25
    Light and Causality in Siris.Timo Airaksinen - 2011 - In Timo Airaksinen & Bertil Belfrage (eds.), Berkeley's Lasting Legacy: 300 Years Later. Cambridge Scholars Press.
    George Berkeley's Siris (1744) has been a neglected work, for many reasons. Some of them are good and some bad. The book is difficult to decipher, mainly because of its ancient metaphysics. He talks about the world as an animal or plant. He speculates about man as a microcosm which is analogous to the universe as a macrocosm. He recommends tar-water as a universal medicine. This was understandable in his own time. But Siris is also a Newtonian treatise which both (...)
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  45. added 2013-09-16
    Berkeley on Volition, Power, and the Complexity of Causation.Kenneth P. Winkler - 1985 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 2 (1):53 - 69.
  46. added 2013-03-26
    Berkeley and the Meaning of Existence.M. R. Ayers - 1986 - History of European Ideas 7 (6):567-573.
  47. added 2013-01-30
    Causation, Fictionalism, and Non-Cognitivism: Berkeley and Hume.P. J. E. Kail - 2010 - In Silvia Parigi (ed.), George Berkeley: Religion and Science in the Age of Enlightenment. Springer.
  48. added 2012-09-03
    Berkeley's Ontology.Lisa Jeanne Downing - 1994 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 32 (2):309-311.
  49. added 2012-04-30
    Berkeley's Case Against Realism About Dynamics.Lisa Downing - 1995 - In Robert G. Muehlmann (ed.), Berkeley's Metaphysics: Structural, Interpretive, and Critical Essays. The Pennsylvania State University Press. pp. 197--214.
    While De Motu, Berkeley's treatise on the philosophical foundations of mechanics, has frequently been cited for the surprisingly modern ring of certain of its passages, it has not often been taken as seriously as Berkeley hoped it would be. Even A.A. Luce, in his editor's introduction to De Motu, describes it as a modest work, of limited scope. Luce writes: The De Motu is written in good, correct Latin, but in construction and balance the workmanship falls below Berkeley's usual standards. (...)
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  50. added 2012-04-28
    Berkeley's Ontology.Robert G. Muehlmann - 1992 - Hackett.
1 — 50 / 64