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  1. Berkeley y la sustancia espiritual / Berkeley and the Spiritual Substance.Alberto Luis López - 2018 - In Laura Benítez Grobet & Luis Ramos-Alarcón Marcín (eds.), El concepto de substancia de Spinoza a Hegel. Mexico City, CDMX, Mexico: pp. 211-232.
    In this paper I have the purpose to analyze George Berkeley’s concept of substance. For this goal, it will be necessary first to track the manner that Berkeley was conceiving that concept, that is, how it was determining in his early philosophy and what kind of role had in it. To make this it must be necessary to review the early notes knowing in Spanish as Philosophical Commentaries; and subsequently it will be required to retake the published work, particularly the (...)
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  2. Berkeley: el conocimiento nocional de la mente / Berkeley on the Notional Knowledge of Mind.Alberto Luis López - 2017 - Contrastes: Revista Internacional de Filosofía 22 (1):137-154.
    In this paper I expose and analyze the berkeleian proposal of notional knowledge. Among other things, this proposal represents Berkeley´s attempt to know the mind or spirit, that is, the thinking and active thing that, by its own activity, results unrepresentable as idea. As such knowledge is already mentioned in the Philosophical Commentaries I will refer to them to know the origins of that proposal. However, as notional knowledge appears in more detail in later works I will make use especially (...)
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  3. Perception and the Physical World.Berkeley's Theory of Vision.D. Armstrong - 1962 - Philosophical Quarterly 12 (49):373-374.
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  4. Berkeley on the Immortality of the Soul.Harry M. Bracken - 1959 - Modern Schoolman 37 (2):77-94.
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  5. Berkeley’s World: An Examination of the Three Dialogues. [REVIEW]Douglas M. Jesseph - 2004 - Philosophical Review 113 (4):571-574.
    This is a puzzling book. On the one hand, Stoneham insists that “we cannot appreciate the contributions made by philosophers like Berkeley without coming to terms with the full breadth and detail of his thought”. On the other hand, his interpretive efforts are directed almost exclusively at the Three Dialogues between Hylas and Philonous—a work Berkeley intended as a popular recasting of his doctrines and one that scholars generally regard as conspicuously lacking the “full breadth and detail” of his philosophy. (...)
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  6. Berkeley's Theory of Vision: A Critical Examination of Bishop Berkeley's Essay Towards a New Theory of Vision.Colin Turbayne - 1965 - Philosophical Review 74 (4):541.
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  7. Margaret Atherton. Berkeley's Revolution in Vision. Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press, 1990. Pp. Xii + 249. ISBN 0-8014-2358-9. S29.90. [REVIEW]Geoffrey Cantor - 1991 - British Journal for the History of Science 24 (2):257-258.
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  8. Berkeley on the Immortality of the Soul.Harry M. Bracken - 1960 - Modern Schoolman 37 (3):197-212.
  9. Berkeley's Theory of Vision. [REVIEW]D. J. O'Connor - 1963 - Journal of Philosophy 60 (16):472-473.
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  10. Berkeley's Theory of Vision: Optical Origins and Ontological Consequences.Giovanni Battista Grandi - unknown
    In the present work Berkeley's theory of vision is considered in its historical origins, in its relation to Berkeley's general philosophical conceptions, and in its early reception. Berkeley's theory replaces an account of vision according to which distance and other spatial properties are deduced from elementary data through an unconscious geometric inference. This account of vision in terms of "natural geometry" was first introduced by Descartes and Malebranche. Among Berkeley's immediate sources of knowledge of the geometric theory of perception, a (...)
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  11. CHAPTER 18. The Issue of "Common Sensibles" in Berkeley's New Theory of Vision.Margaret Dauler Wilson - 1999 - In Ideas and Mechanism: Essays on Early Modern Philosophy. Princeton University Press. pp. 257-275.
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  12. Review: Talia Mae Bettcher, Berkeley’s Philosophy of Spirit: Consciousness, Ontology and the Elusive Subject. [REVIEW]Genevieve Migely - 2008 - Berkeley Studies:47-49.
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  13. Berkeley's Criticism of Abstract Ideas.John S. Linnell - 1954 - Dissertation, University of Minnesota
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  14. Margaret Atherton, Berkeley's Revolution in Vision. [REVIEW]Peter Loptson - 1992 - Philosophy in Review 12:379-383.
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  15. Talia Mae Bettcher, Berkeley's Philosophy of Spirit: Consciousness, Ontology and the Elusive Subject. [REVIEW]Costica Bradatan - 2008 - Philosophy in Review 28 (5):320-322.
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  16. Abstract Ideas and Images.E. J. Furlong, C. A. Mace & D. J. O'connor - 1953 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 27:121-158.
  17. Berkeley's Notion of Suggestion.Jody Lynne Graham - 1993 - Dissertation, The Ohio State University
    In An Essay Towards a New Theory of Vision Berkeley introduces the notion of suggestion as an alternative to those accounts of perception he labels the "mathematicians' account". Both kinds of accounts are offered to explain how we visually perceive the distance of an object which is itself not immediately perceived. I examine in depth the mathematicians' account as found in Descartes, Malebranche and Molyneux, along with Berkeley's several criticisms of this approach. I also explicate Berkeley's alternative theory according to (...)
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  18. WHITAKER, THOMAS.-The Theory of Abstract Ideas. [REVIEW]John Laird - 1916 - Mind 25:276.
  19. Between Substance and Mode: The Ontology of Ideas Among the Early Moderns.Marc A. Hight - 1999 - Dissertation, Syracuse University
    This work studies early modern thought concerning the ontology of ideas. I endeavor to establish, contrary to some current scholarship, that the Early Moderns remained firmly in the grip of a substance/mode ontology narrowed from the substance/property distinction inherited from Aristotle. I argue that this traditional dichotomy provides the most philosophically and historically fruitful approach to understanding early modern thought. In particular, I demonstrate how the increasing radicalization in the metaphysics of the moderns is best explained by remaining within the (...)
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  20. An Analysis of the Leading Conceptual Confusions in George Berkeley's 'Anessay Towards a New Theory of Vision.'.Kenneth Hughes Metzger - 1968 - Dissertation, The University of Nebraska - Lincoln
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  21. RMSTRONG, D. M.: "Berkeley's Theory of Vision". [REVIEW]W. D. Joske - 1961 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 39:288.
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  22. Consciousness and Berkeley's Metaphysics.Peter B. Lloyd - 1999
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  23. An Essay Towards a New Theory of Vision Berkeley in the Modern Context.David Vernon - 1992 - Trinity College, Department of Computer Science.
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  24. A Review of Berkeley's Theory of Vision Designed to Show the Unsoundness of That Celebrated Speculation. [REVIEW]Samuel Bailey - 1842 - James Ridgway.
    \A Mk 5:0" if; A REVIEW BERKELEY'S THEORY OF VISION, DESIGNED TO SHOW THE UNSOUNDNESS OF THAT CELEBRATED SPECULATION. BY SAMUEL BAILEY, AUTHOR OF ESSAYS ON THE FORMATION AND PUBLICATION OF ...
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  25. Berkeley's New Theory of Vision.George J. Stack - 1970 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 51 (1):106.
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  26. Berkeley's Theory of Vision.D. M. Armstrong - 1963 - Journal of Philosophy 60 (16):472-473.
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  27. Berkeley’s Ideas of Reflection.Daniel Flage - 2006 - Berkeley Studies 17:7-13.
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  28. Short View and Synoptic Vision in Berkeley's Works.Genevieve Brykman - 2010 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de L Etranger 135 (1):83.
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  29. Margaret Atherton, Berkeley's Revolution in Vision Reviewed By.Peter Loptson - 1992 - Philosophy in Review 12 (6):379-383.
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  30. Berkeley: Ideas, Immateralism, and Objective Presence.Keota Fields - 2011 - Lexington Books.
    This book offers novel interpretations of several of Berkeley's most distinctive philosophical doctrines, including his theory of vision, heterogeneity thesis, anti-abstractionism, immaterialism, likeness principle, and the divine language thesis. Key to those interpretations is a focus on Berkeley's critical use of the Cartesian doctrine of objective presence, which demands causal explanations for the content of sensory ideas.
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  31. Sensuous Abstraction and the Abstract Sense of Reality.Samuel Todes - 1969 - In James M. Edie (ed.), New Essays in Phenomenology. Chicago: Quadrangle Books.
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  32. Principle of Resemblance and Heterogeneity of Ideas in Berkeley Philosophy.G. Brykman - 1985 - Revue Internationale de Philosophie 39 (154):242-251.
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  33. Aristotle's Theory of Vision.Joseph P. Mueller - 1930 - Modern Schoolman 7 (1):15-16.
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  34. The Nature of Distance Vision.O. O. Norris - 1934 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 17 (3):462.
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  35. On the Genesis of Abstract Ideas.M. I. Posner & S. W. Keele - 1968 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 77 (2p1):353-363.
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  36. L'Essai Sur la Vision de Berkeley Et Sa Défense Et Explication de la Théorie de la Vision.A. A. Luce - 1953 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 143:164 - 180.
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  37. Minds, Ideas and Objects: Essays on the Theory of Representation in Modern Philosophy.Michael Ayers - 1997 - Philosophical Review 106 (2):288-291.
    Minds, Ideas and Objects is a collection of conference papers on the topic of seventeenth- and eighteenth-century theories of ideas or “sensory experience, thought, knowledge and their objects.” At least half the twenty-three papers are by well-known historians of philosophy who seldom disappoint, and there is some equally thought-provoking work among the rest. Some papers say little that is surprising, and some, including good ones, fail to convince, but few are weak. It is perhaps to be expected that coverage of (...)
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  38. The Mythical Time of Ideas (Abstract).Mauro Carbone - 1999 - Chiasmi International 1:231-231.
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  39. Berkeley's Theory of Vision.K. M. Sayre - 1961 - Philosophical Studies (Dublin) 11:203-207.
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  40. Berkeley's Four Concepts of the Soul (1707-1709).Bertil Belfrage - 2007 - In Stephen H. Daniel (ed.), Reexamining Berkeley's Philosophy.
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  41. Perceiving and Berkeley's Theory of Substance.Phillip D. Cummins - 2007 - In Stephen H. Daniel (ed.), Reexamining Berkeley's Philosophy.
  42. Is Berkeley's a Cartesian Mind?Willis Doney - 1982 - In Colin M. Turbayne (ed.), Berkeley: Critical and Interpretive Essays.
  43. Symposium: Abstract Ideas and Images.E. J. Furlong, C. A. Mace & D. J. O'Connor - 1953 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 27 (1):121 - 158.
  44. Berkeley’s Concept of Mind as Presented in Book II of The Principles.Henry Frankel - 1977 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 15 (1):37-51.
  45. Berkeley and Cognition.M. Glouberman - 1981 - Philosophy 56 (216):213 - 221.
    In ‘Berkeley and God’, Jonathan Bennett diagnoses Berkeley's intermittent advocacy of the proposition that physical things ‘do sometimes exist when not perceived by any human spirit’ by pinning on him the invalid argument, vitiated by the ambiguity of ‘depend’, from all ideas depend on some spirit or other, via some sensible ideas do not depend on these spirits themselves, to some ideas depend on non-finite spirits.
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  46. Vanities of the Eye: Vision in Early Modern European Culture.Stuart Clark - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    Species : visions and values -- Fantasies : seeing without what was within -- Prestiges : illusions in magic and art -- Glamours : demons and virtual worlds -- Images : the reformation of the eyes -- Apparitions : the discernment of spirits -- Sights : King Saul and King Macbeth -- Seemings : philosophical scepticism -- Dreams : the epistemology of sleep -- Signs : vision and the new philosophy.
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  47. Berkeley on Minds and Agency.Phillip D. Cummins - 2005 - In Kenneth Winkler (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Berkeley. Cambridge University Press. pp. 190.
  48. Berkeley's Stoic Notion of Spiritual Substance.Stephen Daniel - 2008 - In Stephen H. Daniel (ed.), New Interpretations of Berkeley's Thought. Humanity Books.
    For Berkeley, minds are not Cartesian spiritual substances because they cannot be said to exist (even if only conceptually) abstracted from their activities. Similarly, Berkeley's notion of mind differs from Locke's in that, for Berkeley, minds are not abstract substrata in which ideas inhere. Instead, Berkeley redefines what it means for the mind to be a substance in a way consistent with the Stoic logic of 17th century Ramists on which Leibniz and Jonathan Edwards draw. This view of mind, I (...)
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  49. Condillac's Phenomenological Rejection of Locke and Berkeley.Nicholas Pastore - 1967 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 27 (3):429-431.
  50. Physiological Mechanisms in the Perception of Distance by Sight and Berkeley's Theory of Vision.M. H. Pirenne - 1953 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 4 (13):13-21.
1 — 50 / 436