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  1. Semiotics Against Transubstantiation: Peirce’s Reception of Berkeley.Takaharu Oda - 2021 - In Sign, Method, and the Sacred: New Direction in Semiotic Methodologies for the Study of Religion. Berlin, Germany: pp. 147-170.
    This article argues that George Berkeley’s (1685–1753) interpretation of scientific and religious language was significantly received in C.S. Peirce’s (1839–1914) pragmatist semiotic.1 To this end, their similar views against transubstantiation in the Eucharist (Lord’s Supper, Holy Communion) will be considered. Berkeley being an Anglican bishop and Peirce’s life being linked to the Episcopal Church,2 a chief emphasis will be placed upon Peirce’s deriving his pragmatic method from Berkeley’s philosophy of language. At least three times, Peirce reviewed Berkeley’s works, including Manuscript (...)
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  2. Berkeley, Newton, Explanation, and Causation.Richard Brook - 2019 - Ruch Filozoficzny 74 (4):21.
    Berkeley, Newton, Explanation, and Causation -/- I argue in this paper that Berkeley’s conception of natural law explanations, which echoes Newton’s, fails to solve a fundamental problem, which I label “explanatory asymmetry"; that the model of explanation Berkeley uses fails to distinguish between explanations and justifications, particularly since Berkeley denies real (efficient causes) in non-minded nature. At the end I suggest Berkeley might endorse a notion of understanding, say in astronomy or mechanics, which could be distinguished from explanation.
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  3. The Ad Hominem Argument of Berkeley’s Analyst.Clare Marie Moriarty - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (3):429-451.
    ABSTRACTThis paper responds to two issues in interpreting George Berkeley’s Analyst. First, it explains why the text contains no discussion of religious mysteries or points of faith, despite the claims of the text's subtitle; I argue that the subtitle must be understood, and its success assessed, in conjunction with material external to the text. Second, it’s unclear how naturally the arguments of the Analyst sit with Berkeley’s broader views. He criticizes the methodology of calculus and conceptually problematic entities, and the (...)
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  4. Respuesta al comentario de David Camilo Téllez Guzmán. “Berkeley: el papel de Dios en la teoría de la visión.” / Reply to criticism of my article on The Role of God in Berkeley's Theory of Vision.Alberto Luis - 2017 - Ideas Y Valores 66 (163):409.
    Discussion about one of my papers on Berkeley.
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  5. Berkeley and the Primary Qualities: Idealization Vs. Abstraction.Richard Brook - 2016 - Philosophia 44 (4):1289-1303.
    In the First of the Three Dialogues, Berkeley’s Hylas, responding to Philonous’s question whether extension and motion are separable from secondary qualities, says: What! Is it not an easy matter, to consider extension and motion by themselves,... Pray how do the mathematicians treat of them?
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  6. Berkeley, Descartes and the Science of Nature.Jonathan Dancy - 2014 - The Harvard Review of Philosophy 20:4-16.
  7. Berkeley: El origen de la crítica a los infinitesimales / Berkeley: The Origin of his Critics to Infinitesimals.Alberto Luis López - 2014 - Cuadernos Salmantinos de Filosofía 41 (1):195-217.
    BERKELEY: THE ORIGIN OF CRITICISM OF THE INFINITESIMALS Abstract: In this paper I propose a new reading of a little known George Berkeley´s work Of Infinites. Hitherto, the work has been studied partially, or emphasizing only the mathematical contributions, downplaying the philosophical aspects, or minimizing mathematical issues taking into account only the incipient immaterialism. Both readings have been pernicious for the correct comprehension of the work and that has brought as a result that will follow underestimated its importance, and therefore (...)
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  8. As posições de Newton, Locke e Berkeley sobre a natureza da gravitação.Silvio Seno Chibeni - 2013 - Scientiae Studia 11 (4):811-839.
    Ao defender, nos Princípios matemáticos de filosofia natural, a existência de uma força de gravitação universal, Newton desencadeou uma onda de dúvidas e objeções filosóficas. Suas próprias declarações sobre a natureza da gravitação não são facilmente interpretáveis como formando um conjunto consistente de opiniões. Por um lado, logo após fornecer as três definições de "quantidades de forças centrípetas" (Defs. 6-8), Newton observa que está tratando tais forças "matematicamente", sem se pronunciar sobre sua realidade física. Mas, por outro lado, no Escólio (...)
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  9. On the Ghosts of Departed Quantities: Silvia Parigi : George Berkeley: Religion and Science in the Age of Enlightenment. Dordrecht: Springer, 2011, Xix+204pp, $139.00 HB.Fred Ablondi - 2012 - Metascience 21 (3):681-683.
    On the ghosts of departed quantities Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 1-3 DOI 10.1007/s11016-011-9606-5 Authors Fred Ablondi, Department of Philosophy, Hendrix College, Conway, AR, USA Journal Metascience Online ISSN 1467-9981 Print ISSN 0815-0796.
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  10. George Berkeley: Religion and Science in the Age of Enlightenment. [REVIEW]S. Seth Bordner - 2012 - Philosophy in Review 32 (4):313-315.
  11. Compte rendu de : Luc Peterschmitt, Berkeley et la chimie. Une philosophie pour la chimie au XVIIIe siècle. [REVIEW]François Pépin - 2012 - Methodos. Savoirs Et Textes 12 (12).
    Ce livre, issu d’une thèse de doctorat sur Berkeley et les sciences, constitue la première étude systématique des rapports entre Berkeley et la chimie. C’est aussi une tentative originale pour examiner la cohérence et la pertinence d’un des derniers textes de Berkeley, la Siris, souvent considérée comme un ouvrage mineur, voire comme une erreur de vieillesse. Ces deux projets novateurs se croisent, puisque c’est par la philosophie de la chimie que Luc Peterschmitt cherche à montrer l’intérêt ..
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  12. What is It the Unbodied Spirit Cannot Do? Berkeley and Barrow on the Nature of Geometrical Construction.Stefan Storrie - 2012 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (2):249-268.
    In ?155 of his New Theory of Vision Berkeley explains that a hypothetical ?unbodied spirit? ?cannot comprehend the manner wherein geometers describe a right line or circle?.1The reason for this, Berkeley continues, is that ?the rule and compass with their use being things of which it is impossible he should have any notion.? This reference to geometrical tools has led virtually all commentators to conclude that at least one reason why the unbodied spirit cannot have knowledge of plane geometry is (...)
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  13. A natureza da ciência empírica segundo Berkeley.F. O. Urmson - 2012 - Critica.
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  14. Light and Causality in Siris.Timo Airaksinen - 2011 - In Timo Airaksinen & Bertil Belfrage (eds.), Berkeley's Lasting Legacy: 300 Years Later. Cambridge Scholars Press.
    George Berkeley's Siris (1744) has been a neglected work, for many reasons. Some of them are good and some bad. The book is difficult to decipher, mainly because of its ancient metaphysics. He talks about the world as an animal or plant. He speculates about man as a microcosm which is analogous to the universe as a macrocosm. He recommends tar-water as a universal medicine. This was understandable in his own time. But Siris is also a Newtonian treatise which both (...)
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  15. Berkeley's New Theory of Vision: Science of Metaphysics?Luc Peterschmitt - 2011 - In Timo Airaksinen & Bertil` Belfrage (eds.), Berkeley's Lasting Legacy: 300 Years Later. Cambridge Scholars Press.
    Bertil Belfrage has recently given a "new interpretation" of Berkeley's Theory of Vision. He opposes the view that it is a contribution to metaphysics; it is, he argues, a scientific theory comparable with physics and mechanics. I shall argue that both alternatives are mistaken: Berkeley does not present any definite theory at all in his essay on vision; it is not a contribution either to science or metaphysics but an essay towards a theory that would include both scientific and metaphysical (...)
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  16. Berkeley Et la Chimie: Une Philosophie Pour la Chimie au Xviiie Siècle.Luc Peterschmitt - 2011 - Classiques Garnier.
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  17. Berkeley and Newton on Gravity in Siris.Timo Airaksinen - 2010 - In Silvia Parigi (ed.), George Berkeley: Religion and Science in the Age of Enlightenment. Springer.
  18. Active Principles and Trinities in Berkeley's "Siris".Timo Airaksinen - 2010 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 135 (1):57 - 70.
    Berkeley's Siris is a chain of arguments which ends in God. First God is a metaphysical principle causally regulating the world or Macrocosm. But in the final paragraphs of Siris, God is treated in a theological perspective. This is to say that Berkeley introduces the idea of the Trinity and relates it to the rest of his chain argument. He says that Father, Son, and Spirit correspond to the philosophical notions of sun, light, and heat. I study the final theological (...)
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  19. Berkeley e o papel das hipóteses na filosofia natural.Silvio Seno Chibeni - 2010 - Scientiae Studia 8 (3):389-419.
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  20. Optical Geometry, Retinal Images and Berkeley's Corpuscles.Richard Glauser - 2010 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de L Etranger 135 (2):301-301.
  21. Berkeley's Metaphysical Instrumentalism.Marc A. Hight - 2010 - In Silvia Parigi (ed.), George Berkeley: Science and Religion in the Age of Enlightenment. Springer.
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  22. Causation, Fictionalism, and Non-Cognitivism: Berkeley and Hume.P. J. E. Kail - 2010 - In Silvia Parigi (ed.), George Berkeley: Religion and Science in the Age of Enlightenment. Springer.
  23. "Scire Per Causas" Versus "Scire Per Signa": George Berkeley and Scientific Explanation in Siris.Silvia Parigi - 2010 - In George Berkeley: Religion and Science in the Age of Enlightenment. Springer.
  24. Siris and the Renaissance: Some Overlooked Berkeleian Sources.Silvia Parigi - 2010 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 135 (1):151.
    This essay deals with a quite unexplored topic : Berkeley's sources from Renaissance. In fact, while the relationships between Berkeley and the most well-known modern philosophers (as Descartes, Malebranche, Locke and Hume) have been widely analysed, the importance of Berkeley's classical learning and erudition for the development of his own philosophical thought has usually been overlooked. After some general considerations, I focus on two topics : ether and tar-water in Siris. Cet essai traite un sujet très peu exploré : les (...)
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  25. Un impensé des Principes de la connaissance humaine : la physique mathématique.Luc Peterschmitt - 2010 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 135 (1):19.
    J'entends montrer que Berkeley ne traite pas de la physique mathématique dans les Principes de la connaissance humaine, alors qu'il aurait dû le faire. En effet, la manière dont il conçoit la nature est, sur des points cruciaux, à l'opposé de ce qui fonde le traitement géométrique des phénomènes. Dans cette mesure, l'application des mathématiques reste un impensé de l'immatérialisme en 1710, et elle ne sera prise en charge que dans le De Motu. My aim is to show that Berkely (...)
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  26. Berkeley and Chemistry in the Siris.Luc Peterschmitt - 2010 - In Silvia Parigi (ed.), George Berkeley: Religion and Science in the Age of Enlightenment. Springer.
    In this paper, I would like to show how it is possible to understand and comment on Berkeley’s Siris. This book is not that difficult nor that obscure. Siris is unusual: Berkeley seems to have or to invent a new philosophical style. However, firstly, it is still philosophy; and, secondly, it is necessary to stress that, unlike his first works, Siris was read everywhere in Europe.
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  27. “Let the Occult Quality Go”: Interpreting Berkley's Metaphysics of Science.Tom Stoneham & Angelo Cei - 2009 - European Journal of Analytic Philosophy 5 (1):73 - 91.
  28. Berkeley: Uma Física Sem Causas Eficientes.Silvio Chibeni - 2008 - Cadernos de História E Filosofia da Ciência 18 (2).
    A tese da inexistência de causas eficientes no mundo corporal desempenha papel central na filosofia de Berkeley. Neste trabalho mostra-se, inicialmente, como Berkeley a deriva a partir de sua concepção idealista de corpo e da tese da transparência epistêmica das idéias. Passa-se, depois, ao exame de diversas de suas implicações no âmbito da filosofia da ciência: a concepção de leis naturais, as funções preditiva e explicativa dessas leis, o estatuto epistemológico das hipóteses científicas, o confronto entre o mecanicismo estrito e (...)
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  29. Can Berkeley Be an Instrumentalist? Towards a Reappraisal of Berkeley's Philosophy of Science.Luc Peterschmitt - 2008 - Berkeley Studies 19:19-31.
  30. Rethinking Ideas of Newton, Berkeley and Mach Today.Eduard I. Sorkin - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 45:501-509.
    The report is dedicated to modern understanding of the correlation between science and religion that is based on the analysis of certain ideas formulated by Newton, Berkeley and Mach. Newton proceeded from the existence of infinite (absolute) Space that he interpreted as the Sensory of the intelligent omnipresent Being (God) who sees things themselves intimately, and throughly perceives and comprehends them. Human being also has his little “Sensoriums” perceiving the images of things, the Order and the Beauty of their arrangement. (...)
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  31. Review: Sébastien Charles, Ed. Science Et Épistémologie Selon Berkeley. [REVIEW]Luc Peterschmitt - 2007 - Berkeley Studies:32-35.
  32. Instrumentalismo e explicação científica no De motu de Berkeley no De motu de Berkeley.Marcos Rodrigues da Silva - 2006 - Scientiae Studia 4 (1):101-114.
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  33. Occasionalism and Strict Mechanism: Malebranche, Berkeley, Fontenelle.Lisa Downing - 2005 - In Christia Mercer (ed.), Early Modern Philosophy: Mind, Matter, and Metaphysics. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. pp. 206-230.
    The rich connections between metaphysics and natural philosophy in the early modern period have been widely acknowledged and productively mined, thanks in no small part to the work of Margaret Wilson, whose book, Descartes, served as an inspirational example for a generation of scholars. The task of this paper is to investigate one particular such connection, namely, the relation between occasionalist metaphysics and strict mechanism. My focus will be on the work of Nicholas Malebranche, the most influential Cartesian philosopher after (...)
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  34. Berkeley's Natural Philosophy and Philosophy of Science.Lisa Downing - 2005 - In Kenneth Winkler (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Berkeley. Cambridge University Press. pp. 230--265.
    Although George Berkeley himself made no major scientific discoveries, nor formulated any novel theories, he was nonetheless actively concerned with the rapidly evolving science of the early eighteenth century. Berkeley's works display his keen interest in natural philosophy and mathematics from his earliest writings (Arithmetica, 1707) to his latest (Siris, 1744). Moreover, much of his philosophy is fundamentally shaped by his engagement with the science of his time. In Berkeley's best-known philosophical works, the Principles and Dialogues, he sets up his (...)
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  35. ON THE ORIGIN OF MODERN NATURALISM: THE SIGNIFICANCE OF BERKELEY's RESPONSE TO A NEWTONIAN INDISPENSIBILITY ARGUMENT.Eric Schliesser - 2005 - Philosophica 76:45-66.
    I call attention to Berkeley’s treatment of a Newtonian indispensability argument against his own main position. I argue that the presence of this argument marks a significant moment in the history of philosophy and science: Newton’s achievements could serve as a separate and authoritative source of justification within philosophy. This marks the presence of a new kind of naturalism. A long the way, I argue against the claim tha t there is no explicit opposition or distinction between “philosophy” and “science” (...)
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  36. Les limites de la philosophie naturelle de Berkeley.Stephen H. Daniel - 2004 - In Sébastien Charles (ed.), Science et épistémologie selon Berkeley. Presses de l’Université Laval. pp. 163-70.
    (Original French text followed by English version.) For Berkeley, mathematical and scientific issues and concepts are always conditioned by epistemological, metaphysical, and theological considerations. For Berkeley to think of any thing--whether it be a geometrical figure or a visible or tangible object--is to think of it in terms of how its limits make it intelligible. Especially in De Motu, he highlights the ways in which limit concepts (e.g., cause) mark the boundaries of science, metaphysics, theology, and morality.
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  37. Newton y Berkeley, Atomistas Epicúreos.José Antonio Robles García - 2004 - Revista Latinoamericana de Filosofia 30 (1):7-35.
  38. Berkeley and the Moon Illusion.Basileios Kroustallis - 2004 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 21 (2):151 - 166.
  39. Éter, espírito animal e causalidade no Siris de George Berkeley: uma visão imaterialista da analogia entre macrocosmo e microcosmo.Silvia Manzo - 2004 - Studia Scientia 2 (2):179-205.
  40. Ether, Animal Spirit and Causality in George Berkeley's Siris: An Imaterialist Vision of the Analogy Between Macro and Microcosmos.Silvia Alejandra Manzo - 2004 - Scientiae Studia 2 (2):179-205.
  41. Berkeley et les hypothesés mathématiques.Luc Peterschmitt - 2003 - Archives Internationales D’Histoire des Sciences 53:184-197.
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  42. Berkeley and the Argument From Microscopes.Robert W. Faaborg - 1999 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 80 (4):301–323.
  43. CHAPTER 17. Berkeley and the Essence of the Corpuscularians.Margaret Dauler Wilson - 1999 - In Ideas and Mechanism: Essays on Early Modern Philosophy. Princeton University Press. pp. 243-256.
  44. Berkeley: Experimental Philosophy.David Berman - 1997 - Weidenfeld & Nicolson.
    A short book combining extracts from one of the world's greatest thinkers with commentary from one of Britain's most distinguished writers on philosophy.
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  45. Berkeley's Case Against Realism About Dynamics.Lisa Downing - 1995 - In Robert G. Muehlmann (ed.), Berkeley's Metaphysics: Structural, Interpretive, and Critical Essays. The Pennsylvania State University Press. pp. 197--214.
    While De Motu, Berkeley's treatise on the philosophical foundations of mechanics, has frequently been cited for the surprisingly modern ring of certain of its passages, it has not often been taken as seriously as Berkeley hoped it would be. Even A.A. Luce, in his editor's introduction to De Motu, describes it as a modest work, of limited scope. Luce writes: The De Motu is written in good, correct Latin, but in construction and balance the workmanship falls below Berkeley's usual standards. (...)
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  46. Siris and the Scope of Berkeley's Instrumentalism.Lisa J. Downing - 1995 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 3 (2):279 – 300.
    I. Introduction Siris, Berkeley's last major work, is undeniably a rather odd book. It could hardly be otherwise, given Berkeley's aims in writing it, which are three-fold: 'to communicate to the public the salutary virtues of tar-water,'1 to provide scientific background supporting the efficacy of tar-water as a medicine, and to lead the mind of the reader, via gradual steps, toward contemplation of God.2 The latter two aims shape Berkeley's extensive use of contemporary natural science in Siris. In particular, Berkeley's (...)
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  47. Berkeley's Philosophy of Mathematics by Douglas M. Jesseph. [REVIEW]Erik Sageng - 1994 - Isis 85:520-521.
  48. Berkeley and the Microworld.Catherine Wilson - 1994 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 76 (1):37-64.
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  49. Reconciling Berkeley's Microscopes in God's Infinite Mind.Dale Jacquette - 1993 - Religious Studies 29 (4):453 - 463.
    God knows or hath ideas; but His ideas are not convey'd to Him by sense, as ours are. Your not distinguishing where there is so manifest a difference, makes you fancy you see an absurdity where there is none.
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  50. De Motu and The Analyst: A Modern Edition, with Introductions and Commentary. George Berkeley, Douglas M. Jesseph.D. Bertoloni Meli - 1993 - Isis 84 (3):584-585.
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