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  1. Lo empírico y lo supraempírico en la percepción, según Berkeley.Concepción Cogolludo Mansilla - 1973 - Logos. Anales Del Seminario de Metafísica [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, España] 8:53-78.
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  2. Berkeley on the Numerical Identity of What Several Immediately Perceive.Richard Glauser - 2012 - Philosophy Compass 7 (8):517-530.
    Although several passages in Berkeley are related to the question whether two or more finite substances can simultaneously perceive numerically identical sensible ideas, it is only in TDHP that he addresses the question explicitly and in some detail. Yet, Berkeley’s less than straightforward reply is notoriously difficult to pin down. Some commentators take Berkeley to be endorsing a clear‐cut positive reply, whereas others have him giving an emphatically negative one; others hold that for Berkeley there is no fact of the (...)
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  3. Berkeley and Scepticism.George Pappas - 1999 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 59 (1):133-149.
    In both the Principles and the Three Dialogues, Berkeley claims that he wants to uncover those principles which lead to scepticism; to refute those principles; and to refute scepticism itself. This paper examines the principles Berkeley says have scepticial consequences, and contends that only one of them implies scepticism. It is also argued that Berkeley's attempted refutation of scepticism rests not on his acceptance of the esse est percipi principle, but rather on the thesis that physical objects and their sensible (...)
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  4. "Magic Buffalo" and Berkeley's Theory of Vision: Learning in Society.David M. Levy - 1993 - Hume Studies 19 (1):223-226.
  5. Berkeley’s Use of the Relativity Argument.Richard T. Lambert - 1980 - Idealistic Studies 10 (2):107-121.
    The philosophical texts of George Berkeley contain many references to the “relativity” of sensible qualities, that is, to their variation when perceived by different observers; and several of his arguments for immaterialism employ this concept. Many interpreters in this century have minimized the significance and impugned the validity of this argument. Warnock ridicules it as a sophism based on a “fantastic assumption,” and Johnston gives it short shrift. Jessop considers the relativity argument an ad hominem insufficient to demonstrate immaterialism. Indeed, (...)
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  6. Will, Ideas and Perception in Berkeley’s God.Craig Lehman - 1981 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 19 (2):197-203.
  7. A Note on Berkeley’s New Theory of Vision and Thomas Reid’s Distinction Between Primary and Secondary Qualities.Bruce Silver - 1974 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 12 (2):253-263.
  8. Two Arguments From Perceptual Relativity in Berkeley’s Dialogues Between Hylas and Philonous.Georges Dicker - 1982 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 20 (4):409-422.
    I argue that philonous gives two versions of the argument from perceptual relativity--One for the secondary qualities and another for the primary. Further, Both versions ultimately turn on the epistemological assumption that every case of perceiving, Regardless of the conditions of observation, Is a case of "knowing" the character of some "object". This assumption is made in order to avoid a vicious regress that arises when one tries to understand how perceptual knowledge is possible.
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  9. Berkeley’s Conception of God From the Standpoint of Perception and Causation.James A. Elbert - 1934 - New Scholasticism 8 (2):152-158.
  10. The Invisible World of Berkeley’s New Theory of Vision.Bruce Silver - 1977 - New Scholasticism 51 (2):142-161.
  11. Berkeley, Pitcher, and Distance Perception.A. David Kline - 1980 - International Studies in Philosophy 12 (2):1-8.
  12. 7. Berkeley and the Argument From Perceptual Variation.Alan Hausman & David Hausman - 1997 - In Alan Hausman & David Hausman (eds.), Descartes's Legacy: Mind and Meaning in Early Modern Philosophy. University of Toronto Press. pp. 99-111.
  13. Berkeley’s Puzzle.Alan Millar - 2017 - Analysis 77 (1):232-242.
    Millar, A. 2017. Berkeley's Puzzle. Analysis 77: 232–242.
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  14. Sensationalism and Theology in Berkeley's Philosophy.John Wild & Ingemar Hedenius - 1938 - Philosophical Review 47 (3):320.
  15. An Alleged Incoherence in Berkeley's Philosophy.Reinaldo Elugardo - 1978 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 8 (sup1):177-189.
  16. XI—Berkeley and the Man Born Blind.G. N. A. Vesey - 1960 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 61 (1):189-206.
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  17. Berkeley's Revolution in Vision. Margaret Atherton.Kurt Moller Pedersen - 1992 - Isis 83 (4):668-669.
  18. The Argument for Sensationism as Drawn From Dr. Berkeley.E. B. Holt - 1934 - Psychological Review 41 (6):509-533.
  19. The Influence of Berkeley's Study of Vision and Spatial Perception on His Immaterialism.Blanche Lillie Kolar Premo - unknown
  20. CHAPTER 16. Berkeley on the Mind-Dependence of Colors.Margaret Dauler Wilson - 1999 - In Ideas and Mechanism: Essays on Early Modern Philosophy. Princeton University Press. pp. 229-242.
  21. Berkeley's Theory of Perception.George Joseph Stack - 1964 - Dissertation, The Pennsylvania State University
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  22. Phenomenology and the Geometrization of Vision.Aurora Plomer - 1988 - Dissertation, Lancaster University (United Kingdom)
    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. ;The aim of this thesis is to evaluate Descartes and Berkeley's theories of perception in the light of Merleau Ponty's objections to classical theories in La Phenomenologie de la Perception. According to Merleau Ponty--whose thesis is elucidated by reference to the Gestaltists and Husserl--classical theories of perception either rely on causal explanations or on logical analyses. But, Merleau Ponty argues, neither form of explanation can suitably account for the intentional character of (...)
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  23. Bishop Berkeley and the Problem of Perception.Marvin Curtis Sterling - 1976 - Dissertation, University of California, Riverside
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  24. The Retreat From Realism: Philosophical Theories of Vision From Descartes to Berkeley.Celia Rose Curtis Wolf - 1984 - Dissertation, The University of Wisconsin - Madison
    Descartes' writing on optics were important to the victory of the new mechanistic natural philosophy over the Aristoteleans. His innovations, however, destroyed the bases of Aristotelean realism, and contained the seeds from which Berkeley's perceptual idealism developed. This essay examines the interweaving of philosophical and scientific considerations in Descartes' theory of vision against the background of Aristotle's theory of perception, and traces the way in which his theory of vision developed, through the work of Malebranche and Locke, in an increasingly (...)
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  25. The Order and Dating of Berkeley's "Notebooks".Bertil Belfrage - 1985 - Revue Internationale de Philosophie 39 (154):196.
  26. Berkeley and the Moon Illusions.David Berman - 1985 - Revue Internationale de Philosophie 39 (154):215.
  27. Neue Dialoge Zwischen Hylas Und Philonous. Gespräche Über den Kausalzusammenhang des Bewusstseins Und Die Grundlagen der Transcendentalen Philosophie.H. A. Wimmer - 1939 - Journal of Philosophy 36 (17):474-475.
  28. Minima Sensibilia in George Berkeley’s Philosophy.Krzysztof Stachowiak - 2008 - Archiwum Historii Filozofii I Myśli Społecznej 53.
    Berkeley has never given a straight exposition of his theory of minima sensibilia. The aim of this paper is to reconstruct this theory. I am deeply convinced that the number of notes concerning minima included in Berkeley’s Philosophical Commentaries as well as particular sections of his New Theory of Vision provide us with material that is sufficient for mentioned reconstruction and further analysis of this forgotten part of Berkeley‘s philosophy. First of all I examine the origin of the conception of (...)
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  29. Berkeley: Langage de la Perception Et Art de Voir. [REVIEW]Laura Berchielli - 2005 - Berkeley Studies 16:3-5.
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  30. A Phenomenological Reply to Berkeley's' Water Experiment'.E. Wait - 1998 - South African Journal of Philosophy 17:104-111.
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  31. Optical Geometry, Retinal Images and Berkeley's Corpuscles.Richard Glauser - 2010 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de L Etranger 135 (2):301-301.
  32. Berkeley's Theories of Perception: A Phenomenological Critique.John Wild - 1953 - Revue Internationale de Philosophie 7 (1/2=23/24):134-151.
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  33. Adaptation to Inverted Retinal Polarity: What's Up, Bishop Berkeley?Wayne A. Hershberger & David L. Carpenter - 1972 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 94 (3):261.
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  34. Berkeley et le désir de voir.Geneviève Brykman & George Berkeley - 1973 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 163:205 - 213.
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  35. L'EXPÉRIENCE DU RÊVE ET L'EXTÉRIORITÉ (De Descartes à Berkeley).Jean-Marie Beyssade - 1986 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 176 (3):339 - 353.
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  36. A Paradigm Shift in George Berkeley's Philosophy 1707-1709.Bertil Belfrage - 2010 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 135 (1):71 - 82.
    In this paper, I argue that there is a paradigm shift in George Berkeley's philosophy between his early, unpublished manuscripts (1707-1708) and the Theory of Vision (1709). If so, the traditional method of mixing published and unpublished material will lead to a confused picture of both his early, unpublished view and the doctrine that he published. Cet article montre qu'il y a eu un changement de paradigme dans la philosophie de Berkeley entre ses premiers manuscrits, non publiés, de 1707-1708 et (...)
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  37. A Straightforward Solution to Berkeley's Puzzle.John Campbell - 2012 - The Harvard Review of Philosophy 18 (1):31-49.
  38. Berkeley, czyli zmyśl zmysł.Krzysztof Stachowiak - 2005 - Hybris. Revista de Filosofía 3.
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  39. Berkeley's Metaphysical Grammar.Colin Murray Turbayne - 1970 - In A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge / George Berkeley with Critical Essays. Bobbs-Merrill.
  40. Berkeley and Immediate Perception.George S. Pappas - 1987 - In Ernest Sosa (ed.), Essays on the Philosophy of George Berkeley. D. Reidel.
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  41. On the Status of Visuals in Berkeley's 'New Theory of Vision'.Phillip D. Cummins - 1987 - In Ernest Sosa (ed.), Essays on the Philosophy of George Berkeley. D. Reidel.
  42. Berkeley's Divine Language Argument.A. David Kline - 1987 - In Ernest Sosa (ed.), Essays on the Philosophy of George Berkeley. D. Reidel.
  43. Berkeley on Visible Figure and Extension.Ralph Schumacher - 2007 - In Stephen H. Daniel (ed.), Reexamining Berkeley's Philosophy.
  44. Dynamical Implications of Berkeley's Doctrine of Heterogeneity: A Note on the Language Model of Nature.Lawrence A. Mirarchi - 1982 - In Colin M. Turbayne (ed.), Berkeley: Critical and Interpretive Essays.
  45. Did Berkeley Completely Misunderstand the Basis of the Primary-Secondary Quality Distinction in Locke?Margaret D. Wilson - 1982 - In Colin M. Turbayne (ed.), Berkeley: Critical and Interpretive Essays.
  46. The Concept of Immediate Perception and Berkeley's Immaterialism.Georges Dicker - 1982 - In Colin M. Turbayne (ed.), Berkeley: Critical and Interpretive Essays.
  47. Berkeley, Perception, and Common Sense.Goerge Pappas - 1982 - In Colin M. Turbayne (ed.), Berkeley: Critical and Interpretive Essays. University of Minnesota Press.
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  48. A Neglected Aspect of the Relationship Between Berkeley's Theory of Vision and His Immaterialism.Rolf Sartorius - 1969 - American Philosophical Quarterly 6 (4):318 - 323.
  49. Catching Berkeley's Shadow.Tom Stoneham - 2011 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 49 (2):116-136.
    Berkeley thinks that we only see the size, shape, location, and orientation of objects in virtue of the correlation between sight and touch. Shadows have all of these spatial properties and yet are intangible. In Seeing Dark Things (2008), Roy Sorensen argues that shadows provide a counterexample to Berkeley's theory of vision and, consequently, to his idealism. This paper shows that Berkeley can accept both that shadows are intangible and that they have spatial properties.
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  50. The Main Part and Pillar of Berkeley's Theory: Idealism and Perceptual Heterogeneity.Thomas M. Lennon - 2011 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 49 (2):91-115.
    Berkeley subscribed to the principle of heterogeneity, that what we see is qualitatively and numerically different from what we touch. He says of this principle that it is “the main part and pillar of [his] theory.” The argument I present here is that the theory to which Berkeley refers is not just his theory of vision, but what that theory was the preparation for, which is nothing less than his idealism. The argument turns on the passivity of perception, which is (...)
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