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  1. The Tension Between Divine Command Theory and Utilitarianism in Mozi and George Berkeley: A Comparison.Michael Hemmingsen - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (3):740-756.
    Mozi and George Berkeley are philosophers who are not often put into conversation. However, I argue that comparing them can shed some light on the relationship between certain philosophical positions and their resulting moral philosophies. Specifically, I will draw attention to the way that their lack of interest in an appearance-reality distinction and in "essence" gives rise to a tension between consequentialism and divine command theory. These similarities exist despite the fact that Mozi and Berkeley otherwise have quite distinct views. (...)
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  2. Siris and Berkeley’s Late Social Philosophy.Adam Grzeliński - 2018 - Idea. Studia Nad Strukturą I Rozwojem Pojęć Filozoficznych 30 (1):199-214.
    In the present article, I aim at showing a shift in Berkeley’s understanding of society in the late Siris. Although the work is primarily devoted to the curative qualities of tar-water and on the speculative level develops a new neoplatonic metaphysic of light, it should also be seen as a work in which Berkeley’s mature philosophy is expressed as a whole. Together with the fact that since the thirties Berkeley thought was more inclined towards practical, i.e. economic and social, issues, (...)
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  3. The Nature, Grounds, and Limits of Berkeley's Argument for Passive Obedience.Samuel C. Rickless - 2017 - Berkeley Studies 26:3-19.
    Scholars disagree about the nature of the doctrinal apparatus that supports Berkeley’s case for passive obedience to the sovereign. Is he a rule-utilitarian, or natural law theorist, or ethical egoist, or some combination of some or all these elements? Here I argue that Berkeley is an act-utilitarian who thinks that one is more likely to act rightly by following certain sorts of rules. I also argue that Berkeley mischaracterizes and misevaluates Locke’s version of the social contract theory. Finally, I consider (...)
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  4. The Good Bishop and the Explanation of Political Authority.Danny Frederick - 2016 - De Ethica 3 (2):23-35.
    A central problem of political philosophy is that of explaining how a state could have the moral authority to enforce laws, promulgate laws which citizens are thereby obliged to obey, give new duties to citizens and levy taxes. Many rival solutions to this problem of political authority have been offered by contemporary and recent philosophers but none has obtained wide acceptance. The current debate takes no cognisance of George Berkeley’s ‘Passive Obedience’, in which he defends the exceptionless duty of not (...)
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  5. In the Upper Room.Timo Airaksinen - 2015 - Philosophy and Theology 27 (2):427-456.
    This paper describes Berkeley’s ethics and analyses its metaphysical presuppositions. His ethical though is based on the theological idea of virtue that means obedience to God’s will and, hence, all ethically relevant concepts contain a reference to God. Berkeley also says that happiness in this vale of tears is God’s gift to us and a reward of virtue in heaven. Happiness is a sign and criterion of virtuous conduct. Obviously this kind of supernatural ethics can work only if its metaphysical (...)
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  6. Vulgar Thoughts: Berkeley on Responsibility and Freedom.Timo Airaksinen - 2015 - In Sebastien Charles (ed.), Berkeley Revisited: Moral, Social and Political Philosophy. Voltaire Foundation. pp. 115-130.
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  7. Improving the Health of the Nation: Berkeley, Virtue and Ireland.Scott Breuninger - 2015 - In Sebastien Charles (ed.), Berkeley Revisited: Moral, Social and Political Philosophy. pp. 161-176.
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  8. Berkeley Revisited: Moral, Social and Political Philosophy.Sébastien Charles (ed.) - 2015 - Voltaire Foundation.
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  9. De Pascal a Locke: la reprise berkeleyenne des enjeux philosophiques concernant la tolerance religieuse et civile.Sebastien Charles - 2015 - In Berkeley Revisited: Moral, Social and Political Philosophy. Voltaire Foundation. pp. 177-190.
  10. Berkeley, Hobbes, and the Constitution of the Self.Stephen H. Daniel - 2015 - In Sébastien Charles (ed.), Berkeley Revisited: Moral, Social and Political Philosophy. Voltaire Foundation. pp. 69-81.
    By focusing on the exchange between Descartes and Hobbes on how the self is related to its activities, Berkeley draws attention to how he and Hobbes explain the forensic constitution of human subjectivity and moral/political responsibility in terms of passive obedience and conscientious submission to the laws of the sovereign. Formulated as the language of nature or as pronouncements of the supreme political power, those laws identify moral obligations by locating political subjects within those networks of sensible signs. When thus (...)
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  11. Ethics in Alciphron.Daniel E. Flage - 2015 - In Sebastien Charles (ed.), Berkeley Revisited: Moral, Social and Political Philosophy. Voltaire Foundation. pp. 53-68.
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  12. Actions, Behaviors, and Volitions in Berkeley's Moral Philosophy.Melissa Frankel - 2015 - In Sebastien Charles (ed.), Berkeley Revisited: Moral, Social and Political Philosophy. Voltaire Foundation. pp. 99-114.
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  13. La bonne societe d'apres Berkeley: entre education religieuse et coutume raisonnable.Jeremy Girard - 2015 - In Sebastien Charles (ed.), Berkeley Revisited: Moral, Social and Political Philosophy. Voltaire Foundation. pp. 227-242.
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  14. George Berkeley's Understanding of Beauty and His Polemic with Shaftesbury.Adam Grzelinski - 2015 - In Sebastien Charles (ed.), Berkeley Revisited: Moral, Social and Political Philosophy. Voltaire Foundation. pp. 209-226.
  15. Berkeley as a Worldly Philosopher.Heta Aleksandra Gylling - 2015 - In Sebastien Charles (ed.), Berkeley Revisited: Moral, Social and Political Philosophy. Voltaire Foundation. pp. 23-36.
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  16. Berkeley on Economic Bubbles.Marc A. Hight - 2015 - In Sebastien Charles (ed.), Berkeley Revisited: Moral, Social and Political Philosophy. Voltaire Foundation. pp. 191-208.
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  17. Berkeley on Doing Good and Meaning Well.Hugh Hunter - 2015 - In Sebastien Charles (ed.), Berkeley Revisited: Moral, Social and Political Philosophy. pp. 131-146.
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  18. Berkeley's Bermuda Project and The Ladies Library.Nancy Kendrick - 2015 - In Sebastien Charles (ed.), Berkeley Revisited: Moral, Social and Political Philosophy. Voltaire Foundation. pp. 243-258.
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  19. Berkeley's Double Understanding of 'Social Appetite'.Marta Szymanska-Lewoszewska - 2015 - In Sebastien Charles (ed.), Berkeley Revisited: Moral, Social and Political Philosophy. Voltaire Foundation. pp. 147-160.
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  20. Le travail de la sagesse: philosophie et exercice spirituel chez George Berkeley.Pascal Taranto - 2015 - In Sebastien Charles (ed.), Berkeley Revisited: Moral, Social and Political Philosophy. Voltaire Foundation. pp. 259-276.
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  21. Berkeley's Pragmatic Bent: Its Implications for His Social Philosophy.Richard J. Van Iten - 2015 - In Sebastien Charles (ed.), Berkeley Revisited: Moral, Social and Political Philosophy. Voltaire Foundation. pp. 83-98.
  22. Montréal Conference Summaries.Stephen H. Daniel & Sébastien Charles - 2012 - Berkeley Studies 23:54-57.
    In June of 2012 scholars from Europe and North America met in Montreal to commemorate the 300th anniversary of the publication of George Berkeley's *Passive Obedience*. In this article Stephen Daniel summarizes the English presentations, and Sébastien Charles summarizes the French presentations, on how Berkeley invokes naturalistic themes in developing a moral theory while still allowing a role for God.
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  23. Passive Obedience and Berkeley’s Moral Philosophy.Matti Häyry - 2012 - Berkeley Studies 23:3-14.
    In Passive Obedience Berkeley argues that we must always observe the prohibitions decreed by our sovereign rulers. He defends this thesis both by providing critiques against opposing views and, more interestingly, by presenting a moral theory that supports it. The theory contains elements of divine - command, natural - law, moral - sense, rule - based, and outcome - oriented ethics. Ultimately, however, it seems to rest on a notion of spiritual reason — a specific God - given faculty that (...)
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  24. Berkeley E Mandeville: Religião E Moralidade.Antonio Carlos dos Santos - 2011 - Filosofia Unisinos 12 (1):56-69.
  25. Berkeley’s Moral and Social Considerations Vindicated. [REVIEW]Marta Syzmańska - 2011 - Berkeley Studies 22:15-19.
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  26. Recovering Bishop Berkeley: Virtue and Society in the Anglo-Irish Context.Scott Breuninger - 2010 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Berkeley's sermons on passive obedience in the Irish context -- Science and sociability: Berkeley's "bond of society" -- Piety, perception, and the free-thinkers -- Luxury, moderation, and the south sea bubble -- Planting religion in the New World, 1722 - 1732 -- Improving Ireland: luxury, virtue, and economic development -- Bishop of Cloyne: protestantism, patriotism, and a national panacea.
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  27. Mandeville dans l''Alciphron'.Eléonore Le Jallé - 2010 - In Laurent Jaffro, Genevieve Brykman & Claire Schwartz (eds.), Berkeley's Alciphron: English Text and Essays in Interpretation. Georg Olms Verlag.
  28. Fictions in Berkeley:: From Epistemology to Morality.Sébastien Charles - 2009 - Berkeley Studies:13-21.
    In the classical era, imagination garnered poor press: fooling the senses, perverting judgment, subverting reason, skewing social relations, and generally providing wrong ideas about the way things are; it was a faculty of which to beware. Occasionally it was recognized as not being entirely without value—Descartes, for example, insisted on its great usefulness as a figurational function in simplifying the work of the understanding in geometry. The traditional tendency in philosophy, though, was to denigrate imagination for its misleading nature and (...)
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  29. Berkeley's Theory of Meaning in Alciphron VII.Kenneth Williford & Roomet Jakapi - 2009 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 17 (1):99 – 118.
  30. Berkeley Polémiste: Des Sermons Sur L’Obéissance Assive (1712) aux Maximes Sur le Patriotisme.Sébastien Charles - 2008 - The European Legacy 13 (4):413-424.
    Cet article vise à présenter une dimension peu connue de la pensée de Berkeley à travers une étude minutieuse des polémiques entretenues par ce dernier tout au long de la première moitié du XVIIIe siècle. Ces polémiques, dont le contenu est généralement politique, moral ou économique, reposent sur trois thèses récurrentes et complémentaires, rarement pensées de concert: une philosophie cyclique de l’histoire; une distinction ontologique entre activité et passivité appliquée à d’autres domaines que celui de la métaphysique; une analogie entre (...)
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  31. Was Berkeley an Ethical Egoist?Daniel Flage - 2008 - Berkeley Studies:3-18.
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  32. The Theological Positivism of George Berkeley (1707-1708).Bertil Belfrage - 2007 - Acta Philosophica Fennica 83:37-52.
    Did George Berkeley, as I argued long ago in Belfrage (1986), defend a theory of "emotive meaning" in his Manuscript Introduction (an early version of the introduction to the Principles)? This question has raised a broad spectrum of different issues, which I think it is important to keep apart, such as rhetorical, psychological, semantic, ethical, metaphysical, and theological aspects. In the present paper, I hope to clear the ground of ambiguities, which have led to serious misunderstandings on this interesting point (...)
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  33. Berkeley's Criticism of Shaftesbury's Moral Theory in Alciphron III.Laurent Jaffro - 2007 - In Stephen H. Daniel (ed.), Reexamining Berkeley's Philosophy.
  34. Berkeley's Moral and Political Philosophy.Stephen Darwall - 2005 - In Kenneth Winkler (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Berkeley. Cambridge University Press. pp. 311.
  35. Berkeley's Economic Writings.Patrick Kelly - 2005 - In Kenneth Winkler (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Berkeley. Cambridge University Press. pp. 339.
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  36. Constantine George Caffentzis: Exciting the Industry of Mankind: George Berkeley's Philosophy of Money.S. Buckle - 2004 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 12 (3):551-553.
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  37. Berkeley's Theory of Operative Language in the Manuscript Introduction.Kenneth Williford - 2003 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (2):271 – 301.
    (2003). Berkeley's theory of operative language in the Manuscript Introduction. British Journal for the History of Philosophy: Vol. 11, No. 2, pp. 271-301. doi: 10.1080/09608780320001047877.
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  38. Morals, the Market, and History: George Berkeley and Social Virtue in Early Eighteenth-Century Thought.Scott Christopher Breuninger - 2002 - Dissertation, The University of Wisconsin - Madison
    Using Berkeley's life as a point of entry in the period, this dissertation approaches his thought from the vantage of contextual intellectual history, examining the relationship between ethical thought and the demands of commercial society during the early eighteenth century . Viewing this period through the prism of Berkeley's career, this dissertation is divided into three sections, chronologically tracing the development of Berkeley's social thought and outlining his place within the context of these contemporary debates. A primary goal of each (...)
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  39. Exciting the Industry of Mankind George Berkeley's Philosophy of Money.Constantine George Caffentzis - 2000
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  40. Obedience to Rules and Berkeley's Theological Utilitarianism.Matti Häyry & Heta Häyry - 1994 - Utilitas 6 (2):233.
    According to what one might call ‘indirect” forms of utilitarian thinking, the proper end of all human action is the greatest happiness of the greatest number of individuals, but due to the fallibility of moral agents this end cannot, and must not, be directly pursued. Instead, according to at least one version of the indirect theory, moral agents have a duty to act in conformity with a set of general rules which, in their turn, have been designed to promote the (...)
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  41. Berkeley's Moral Philosophy.G. Warnock - 1990 - Journal of Medical Ethics 16 (1):48-50.
    Berkeley held that the moral duty of mankind was to obey God's laws; that--since God was a benevolent Creator--the object of His laws must be to promote the welfare and flourishing of mankind; and that, accordingly, humans could identify their moral duties by asking what system of laws for conduct would in fact tend to promote that object. This position--which is akin to that of 'rule' Utilitarianism--is neither unfamiliar nor manifestly untenable. He was surely mistaken, however, in his further supposition (...)
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  42. Money, Obedience, and Affection: Essays on Berkeley's Moral and Political Thought.Stephen R. L. Clark (ed.) - 1989 - Garland.
  43. Berkeley's Theory of Emotive Meaning (1708).Bertil Belfrage - 1986 - Hisory of European Ideas 7 (6):643-649.
  44. Development of Berkeley's Early Theory of Meaning.Bertil Belfrage - 1986 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 176 (3):319-330.
  45. The Jacobitism of Berkeley's Passive Obedience.David Berman - 1986 - Journal of the History of Ideas 47 (2):309-319.
    Why did the Lord Justices make strong representation against Berkeley? According to Joseph Stock, Berkeley's first biographer "Lord Galway [a Lord Justice in 1716] having heard of those sermons, published in 1712 as Passive Obedience represented Berkeley as a Jacobite, and hence unworthy of the living of St. Paul's. From the beginning, Passive Obedience was rumored to be politically heterodox...
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  46. The Moral Philosophy of George Berkeley.G. J. Warnock - 1972 - Journal of Philosophy 69 (15):460-462.
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  47. The Moral Philosophy of George Berkeley.Désirée Park - 1971 - Studi Internazionali Di Filosofia 3:228-230.
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  48. The Moral Philosophy of George Berkeley.Paul J. Olscamp - 1970 - The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff.
    ARCHIVES INTERNATIONALES D'HISTOIRE DES IDEES INTERNATIONAL ARCHIVES OF THE HISTORY OF IDEAS 33 PAUL J. OLSCAMP The Moral Philosophy of George Berkeley ..
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  49. Does Berkeley Have an Ethical Theory?Paul J. Olscamp - 1970 - In Colin Murray Turbayne (ed.), A Treatise on the Principles of Human Knowledge / George Berkeley, with Critical Essays.
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  50. Berkeley’s Moral Philosophy.Thomas D. Sullivan - 1970 - Philosophical Studies (Dublin) 19:193-201.
    To discern the contours of a Berkeleian moral philosophy the article has been divided into four sections: the first introduces the moral importance of Berkeley’s new principle; in the second section the inter-dependence of morality and sociality is discussed; the third section identifies perennial moral problems and Berkeley’s success or failure in dealing with them; the fourth occupies itself with a notion of the common good that is socio-historical. Berkeley’s moral pragmatism is placed in relief in this way.
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