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  1. Burning the Fable of the Bees: The Incendiary Authority of Nature.Danielle Allen - 2004 - In Lorraine Daston & Fernando Vidal (eds.), The Moral Authority of Nature. University of Chicago Press. pp. 74--99.
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  2. Mandeville's Ship: Theistic Design and Philosophical History in Charles Darwin's Vision of Natural Selection.Stephen G. Alter - 2008 - Journal of the History of Ideas 69 (3):441-465.
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  3. Mandeville Studies.G. Douglas Atkins - 1977 - International Studies in Philosophy 9:214-215.
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  4. Mandeville Studies: New Explorations in the Art and Thought of Dr. Bernard Mandeville. [REVIEW]G. Douglas Atkins - 1977 - International Studies in Philosophy 9:214-215.
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  5. Bernard Mandeville and the'Economy'of the Dutch.Alexander Bick - 2008 - Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 1 (1):87-106.
    Studies of Bernard Mandeville by economists and historians ofeconomic thought have focused overwhelmingly on the problem ofsituating his work within the development of the theory of laissez-faireand evaluating his influence on major figures in the ScottishEnlightenment, especially Adam Smith. This paper explores Mandeville’seconomic thought through the lens of a very different transition:England’s rapid growth following the Glorious Revolution and itsgradual eclipse of Dutch economic hegemony. By situating Mandevillewithin an Anglo-Dutch context and carefully examining his commentson the Dutch in Remark Q (...)
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  6. Ethique réaliste au dix-huitième siècle (Bernard Mandeville).N. Westendorp Boerma - 1948 - Synthese 7 (3):235 - 240.
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  7. Business is One Thing, Ethics is Another.George Bragues - 2005 - Business Ethics Quarterly 15 (2):179-203.
    Recent corporate scandals raise an old question anew: is capitalism fundamentally infected by immorality? A now almost forgotten answer to this question was advanced at the dawn of capitalism, an answer that students of business ethics would find profit in considering. In the early eighteenth century, Bernard Mandeville authored The Fable of the Bees, which became notorious in its day for arguing that capitalism created wealth while necessarily relying on vicious impulses. The fundamental dilemma is that morality requires self-denial while (...)
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  8. Business is One Thing, Ethics is Another: Revisiting Bernard Mandeville's The Fable of the Bees.George Bragues - 2005 - Business Ethics Quarterly 15 (2):179-203.
    Recent corporate scandals raise an old question anew: is capitalism fundamentally infected by immorality? A now almost forgotten answer to this question was advanced at the dawn of capitalism, an answer that students of business ethics would find profit in considering. In the early eighteenth century, Bernard Mandeville authored The Fable of the Bees, which became notorious in its day for arguing that capitalism created wealth while necessarily relying on vicious impulses. The fundamental dilemma is that morality requires self-denial while (...)
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  9. Vanity, Virtue and the Duel: The Scottish Response to Mandeville.Andrea Branchi - 2014 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 12 (1):71-93.
    Locating the history of male honour in the perspective of his philosophical anthropology, Mandeville is able to show that the rituals of modern honour are an exemplary expression of that spontaneous, artificial order stemming out of a natural disposition of human passions. For Mandeville, duelling provides decisive evidence that the desire for approval from others, even at the cost of one's life, is a dominant motive in man's behaviour. The aim of this paper is to review selected Scottish responses to (...)
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  10. Francis Hutcheson on Luxury and Intemperance: The Mandeville Threat.Lisa Broussois - 2015 - History of European Ideas 41 (8):1093-1106.
    This paper looks at two figures in the modern, European, eighteenth-century debate on luxury. It claims to better understand the differences between Francis Hutcheson and Bernard Mandeville by exploring how Hutcheson treated the topic of luxury as a distinction between two desires, thus differing from Mandeville's concept of luxury, and a concept of temperance based on moral sense. It explores why Hutcheson believed that luxury was a moral, social and political issue and particularly why he considered Mandeville the embodiment of (...)
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  11. Mandeville, Bernard.Charlotte R. Brown - 2013 - In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  12. Considering Things Minutely: Reflections on Mandeville and the Eighteenth-Century Science of Man.Dario Castiglione - 1986 - History of Political Thought 7 (3):463-488.
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  13. Private Vices, Public Benefits: Dr. Mandeville and the Body Politic.R. A. Collins - 1988 - Dissertation, University of Oxford (United Kingdom)
    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. ;This thesis examines the relationship between Mandeville's medical and non-medical thought, to assess the relevance of the former for an understanding of the latter. By locating his medical text, A Treatise of the Hypochondriack and Hysterick Passions, within the context of an early modern discourse on the nature and treatment of melancholic and nervous disorders, three distinctive features of his medical thought and practice are identified, namely: his commitment (...)
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  14. MONRO, H.: "The Ambivalence of Bernard Mandeville". [REVIEW]J. Colman - 1978 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 56:86.
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  15. Bernard Mandeville and the Reality of Virtue.John Colman - 1972 - Philosophy 47 (180):125 - 139.
    Although his subject matter is far from abstract and his arguments comparatively free from obscurity, Bernard Mandeville has generally been acknowledged a difficult philosopher. It is not hard to see why. First, Mandeville deliberately sets out to generate paradoxes. Secondly, he is not a systematic writer. His views are expounded and developed in a number of works of which The Fable of the Bees is only the best known. Thirdly, and most important, he is not solely a philosopher, but also (...)
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  16. Public Vices, Private Benefits.Ronald Commers - 1993 - Philosophica 52:31-44.
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  17. Bernard Mandeville and the Therapy of "The Clever Politician&Quot.Harold John Cook - 1999 - Journal of the History of Ideas 60 (1):101-124.
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  18. Myth and Rationality in Mandeville.Stephen H. Daniel - 1986 - Journal of the History of Ideas 47 (4):595-609.
    Bernard Mandeville's early work *Typhon* reveals how his *Fable of the Bees* can be understood not only as an extended commentary of an Aesopic fable but also as a form of mythic writing. The appeal to the mythic in discourse provides him with the opportunity to give both a genetic account of the development of language and social practices and a functional account of the the socializing impact of myths (including classical ones). The artificial distinction between treating Mandeville's writings as (...)
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  19. Passion, State, and Progress: Spinoza and Mandeville on the Nature of Human Association.Douglas J. Den Uyl - 1987 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 25 (3):369-395.
  20. 'Damn'd to Sythes and Spades': Labour and Wealth Creation in the Writing of Bernard Mandeville.Ben Dew - 2013 - Intellectual History Review 23 (2):187-205.
    (2013). ‘Damn'd to Sythes and Spades’: Labour and Wealth Creation in the Writing of Bernard Mandeville. Intellectual History Review: Vol. 23, No. 2, pp. 187-205. doi: 10.1080/17496977.2012.731142.
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  21. Pride, Hypocrisy and Civility in Mandeville's Social and Historical Theory.Laurence Dickey - 1990 - Critical Review 4 (3):387-431.
    This paper seeks to show that Bernard Mandeville's primary purpose in The Fable of the Bees was to historicize the concept of self?love (amour?propre) articulated by seventeenth?century French Jansenists and moralistes; that in doing so Mandeville constructed a theory designed to explain the inter?subjective constraints and forces of social discipline which characterize commercial societies; and that a full understanding of Mandeville's achievement depends upon an appreciation of the way in which pride in his theory becomes socialized into hypocrisy at a (...)
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  22. EJ Hundert, The Enlightenment's Fable—Bernard Mandeville and the Discovery of Society Reviewed By.Peter Dockwrey - 1995 - Philosophy in Review 15 (2):108-110.
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  23. Berkeley E Mandeville: Religião E Moralidade.Antonio Carlos dos Santos - 2011 - Filosofia Unisinos 12 (1):56-69.
  24. The Emancipation of Economics From Morality: Mandeville's Fable of the Bees.L. Dumont - 1975 - Social Science Information 14 (1):35-52.
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  25. The Travels of Sir John Mandeville, A Manuscript in the British Library. [REVIEW]Jaroslav Folda - 1985 - Speculum 60 (3):693-694.
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  26. The Travels of Sir John Mandeville, A Manuscript in the British LibraryJosef Krása Peter Kussi.Jaroslav Folda - 1985 - Speculum 60 (3):693-694.
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  27. The Ambivalence of Bernard Mandeville. By Hector Monro. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1975. Pp. 283. $33.50.William K. Frankena - 1976 - Dialogue 15 (2):321-327.
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  28. Mandeville.Edward Frauenglas - 1932 - Kwartalnik Filozoficzny 10 (4):233-256.
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  29. Mandeville's Paradox.Franz From - 1944 - Theoria 10 (3):197-215.
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  30. A proposito di Bernardo di Mandeville.Eugenio Garin - 1958 - Giornale Critico Della Filosofia Italiana 12:500.
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  31. The Fables of Pity: Rousseau, Mandeville and the Animal-Fable.Sean Gaston - 2012 - Derrida Today 5 (1):21-38.
    Prompted by Derrida's work on the animal-fable in eighteenth-century debates about political power, this article examines the role played by the fiction of the animal in thinking of pity as either a natural virtue (in Rousseau's Second Discourse) or as a natural passion (in Mandeville's The Fable of the Bees). The war of fables between Rousseau and Mandeville – and their hostile reception by Samuel Johnson and Adam Smith – reinforce that the animal-fable illustrates not so much the proper of (...)
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  32. Regulating Anew the Moral and Political Sentiments of Mankind: Bernard Mandeville and the Scottish Enlightenment.M. M. Goldsmith - 1988 - Journal of the History of Ideas 49 (4):587.
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  33. “The Treacherous Arts of Mankind”: Bernard Mandeville and Female Virtue.M. M. Goldsmith - 1986 - History of Political Thought 7 (1):94-114.
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  34. Du Châtelet, Voltaire, and the Transformation of Mandeville's Fable.Felicia Gottmann - 2012 - History of European Ideas 38 (2):218-232.
    Summary In about 1735, Emilie Du Châtelet began to translate Mandeville's Fable of the Bees. Her work, which is largely ignored by scholars, did, as this article demonstrates, turn out to be one of transformation rather than of translation and came at a crucial moment in the emerging French luxury debate. So far commercial society and luxury had been defended in purely economic terms, for instance in Melon's Essai politique, or as an aspect of divine providence for fallen man, by (...)
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  35. A Powerless Conscience: Hume on Reflection and Acting Conscientiously.Lorenzo Greco - 2017 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 25 (3):547–564.
    If one looks for the notion of conscience in Hume, there appears to be a contrast between the loose use of it that can be found in his History of England, and the stricter use of it Hume makes in his philosophical works. It is my belief that, notwithstanding the problems Hume’s philosophy raises for a notion such as conscience, it is possible to frame a positive Humean explanation of it. I want to suggest that, far from corresponding to a (...)
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  36. Private Vices, Publick Benefits? The Contemporary Reception of Bernard Mandeville.Eugene Heath - 1999 - Hume Studies 25 (1/2):225-240.
  37. Mandeville's Bewitching Engine of Praise.Eugene Heath - 1998 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 15 (2):205 - 226.
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  38. Sir John Mandeville.M. C. Seymour.Iain Higgins - 1994 - Speculum 69 (4):1271-1272.
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  39. M. C. Seymour, Ed., The Egerton Version of Mandeville's Travels. (Early English Text Society, O.S., 336.) Oxford and New York: Oxford University Press, 2010. Pp. Xxx, 230 Plus Color Frontispiece and 1 Color Figure. £60. [REVIEW]Iain Macleod Higgins - 2011 - Speculum 86 (4):1123-1125.
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  40. Envy and Commercial Society: Mandeville and Smith on "Private Vices, Public Benefits".T. A. Horne - 1981 - Political Theory 9 (4):551-569.
    Man [in commercial society] is sometimes found a detached and solitary being; he has found an object which sets him in competition with his fellow creatures, and he deals with them as he does with his cattle and his soil, for the sake of the profits they bring; the mighty engine which we suppose to have formed society, only tends to set its members at variance, or to continue their intercourse after the bonds of affection are broken.1.
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  41. Bernard Mandeville and the Enlightenment's Maxims of Modernity.Edward J. Hundert - 1995 - Journal of the History of Ideas 56 (4):577-593.
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  42. The True Meaning of the Fable of the Bees in a Letter to the Author of a Book Entitled an Enquiry Whether a General Practice of Virtue Tends to the Wealth or Poverty, Benefit or Disadvantage of a People? Shewing That He has Manifestly Mistaken the True Meaning of the Fable of the Bees in His Reflections on That Book.W. And J. Innys - 1726 - Printed for William and John Innys at the West End of St. Paul's.
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  43. The Intellectual Origins of Modern Democratic Republicanism (1660–1720).Jonathan Israel - 2004 - European Journal of Political Theory 3 (1):7-36.
    Arguably, the tradition of democratic republican theory which arose in the Dutch Republic in the years around 1660 in the writings of Johan and Pieter de la Court, Franciscus van den Enden and Spinoza played a decisively important role in the development of modern democratic political theory. The tradition did not end with Spinoza but continued to develop in the United Provinces and–in the work of Bernard Mandeville, who seemingly belongs more to the Dutch than the British republican tradition–in London, (...)
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  44. Books in Review : The Social Thought of Bernard Mandeville by Thomas A. Horne. London and New York: Macmillan, 1978. Pp. 123. $10. [REVIEW]M. Jack - 1979 - Political Theory 7 (3):434-436.
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  45. Private Vices, Public Benefits. Bernard Mandeville's Social and Political Thought.Malcolm Jack - 1988 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 26 (1):153-155.
  46. The Social and Political Thought of Bernard Mandeville.Malcolm Jack - 1987 - Garland.
  47. The Ambivalence of Bernard Mandeville.Malcolm Jack - 1976 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 14 (3):368-369.
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  48. The Ambivalence of Bernard Mandeville.Bernard Mandeville.Malcolm Jack, H. Monro & R. I. Cook - 1976 - Philosophical Quarterly 26 (103):173.
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  49. Matters of Fact.Matthew L. Jones - 2010 - Modern Intellectual History 7 (3):629-642.
    At the end of Matters of Exchange , Harold Cook's major revisionist account of the early modern scientific revolution, he locates the political and economic writings of Bernard Mandeville within the practices and values of contemporaneous Dutch observational medicine. Like Mandeville, Cook describes the potency of early modern capitalism and its attendant value system in generating industry and knowledge; like Mandeville, Cook finds coercive systems of moral regulation to be mistaken in their estimation of human capacities; and like Mandeville, Cook (...)
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  50. The Impartial Spectator, Amour-Propre, and Consequences of the Secular Gaze: Rousseau's and Adam Smith's Responses to Mandeville.Nigel Joseph - 2011 - Lumen: Selected Proceedings From the Canadian Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies 30:33.
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