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  1. On Pride.Lorenzo Greco - 2019 - Humana Mente 12 (35):101-123.
    In this essay, I offer a vindication of pride. I start by presenting the Christian condemnation of pride as the cardinal sin. I subsequently examine Mandeville’s line of argument whereby pride is beneficial to society, although remaining a vice for the individual. Finally, I focus on, and endorse, the analysis of pride formulated by Hume, for whom pride qualifies instead as a virtue. This is because pride not only contributes to making society flourish but also stabilizes the virtuous agent by (...)
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  2. Bernard Mandeville on Honor, Hypocrisy, and War.Peter Olsthoorn - 2019 - Heythrop Journal 60 (2):205-218.
    Authors from Cicero to Smith held honor to be indispensable to make people see and do what is right. As they considered honor to be a social motive, they did not think this dependence on honor was a problem. Today, we tend to see honor as a self‐regarding motive, but do not see this as problematic because we stopped seeing it as a necessary incentive. Bernard Mandeville, however, agreed with the older authors that honor is indispensable, but agreed with us (...)
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  3. A Powerless Conscience: Hume on Reflection and Acting Conscientiously.Lorenzo Greco - 2017 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 25 (3):547–564.
    If one looks for the notion of conscience in Hume, there appears to be a contrast between the loose use of it that can be found in his History of England, and the stricter use of it Hume makes in his philosophical works. It is my belief that, notwithstanding the problems Hume’s philosophy raises for a notion such as conscience, it is possible to frame a positive Humean explanation of it. I want to suggest that, far from corresponding to a (...)
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  4. Francis Hutcheson on Luxury and Intemperance: The Mandeville Threat.Lisa Broussois - 2015 - History of European Ideas 41 (8):1093-1106.
    This paper looks at two figures in the modern, European, eighteenth-century debate on luxury. It claims to better understand the differences between Francis Hutcheson and Bernard Mandeville by exploring how Hutcheson treated the topic of luxury as a distinction between two desires, thus differing from Mandeville's concept of luxury, and a concept of temperance based on moral sense. It explores why Hutcheson believed that luxury was a moral, social and political issue and particularly why he considered Mandeville the embodiment of (...)
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  5. Honor in Political and Moral Philosophy.Peter Olsthoorn - 2015 - State University of New York Press.
    In this history of the development of ideas of honor in Western philosophy, Peter Olsthoorn examines what honor is, how its meaning has changed, and whether it can still be of use. Political and moral philosophers from Cicero to John Stuart Mill thought that a sense of honor and concern for our reputation could help us to determine the proper thing to do, and just as important, provide us with the much-needed motive to do it. Today, outside of the military (...)
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  6. Vanity, Virtue and the Duel: The Scottish Response to Mandeville.Andrea Branchi - 2014 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 12 (1):71-93.
    Locating the history of male honour in the perspective of his philosophical anthropology, Mandeville is able to show that the rituals of modern honour are an exemplary expression of that spontaneous, artificial order stemming out of a natural disposition of human passions. For Mandeville, duelling provides decisive evidence that the desire for approval from others, even at the cost of one's life, is a dominant motive in man's behaviour. The aim of this paper is to review selected Scottish responses to (...)
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  7. Mandeville on Governability.Martin Otero Knott - 2014 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 12 (1):19-49.
    This paper discusses Bernard Mandeville's (1670–1733) conception of governability. It grounds his key distinction between a submissive and a governable subject in terms of his alternative account of human sociability to demonstrate the nature and structure of relationships that are necessary for upholding stable and flourishing societies. Using Sir William Temple as an interlocutor (1628–1699), it also explores the role played by the cultivation of reverence to authority in Mandeville's analysis of governability.
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  8. What Can an Egoist Say Against an Egoist? On Archibald Campbell's Criticisms of Bernard Mandeville.Christian Maurer - 2014 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 12 (1):1-18.
    Like Bernard Mandeville, Archibald Campbell develops a profoundly egoistic conception of human psychology. However, Campbell attacks numerous points in Mandeville’s moral philosophy, in particular Mandeville’s treatment of self-love, the desire for esteem, and human nature in general as corrupt. He also criticises Mandeville’s corresponding insistence on self-denial and his rigorist conception of luxury. Campbell himself is subsequently attacked by Scottish orthodox Calvinists - not for his egoism, but for his optimism regarding postlapsarian human nature and self-love. This episode demonstrates that (...)
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  9. Cosmopolitanism and Hume’s General Point of View.Neil McArthur - 2014 - European Journal of Political Theory 13 (3):321-340.
    Hume’s writings, taken as a whole, address a dazzlingly broad range of topics. I argue that they do so as part of a coherent and interesting philosophical programme. While Hume’s doctrine of the general point of view provides an attractive way of understanding the process of moral judgement, it raises the threat of parochialism – that is, it potentially makes us prey to the limitations and prejudices of our society. I show that Hume endorses what I call “engaged cosmopolitanism”, which (...)
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  10. Filozofia I Medycyna Mandeville`a, Czyli Oświeceniowe Początki Psychoterapii; (Bernard Mandeville, Un Traité Sur les Passions Hypocondriaques Et Hystériques, Présenté Et Traduit Par Sylvie Kleiman‑Lafont, ELLUG, Université Stendhal, Grenoble 2012) 377'. [REVIEW]Marian Skrzypek - 2014 - Archiwum Historii Filozofii I Myśli Społecznej 59.
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  11. Mandeville, Bernard.Charlotte R. Brown - 2013 - In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  12. 'Damn'd to Sythes and Spades': Labour and Wealth Creation in the Writing of Bernard Mandeville.Ben Dew - 2013 - Intellectual History Review 23 (2):187-205.
    (2013). ‘Damn'd to Sythes and Spades’: Labour and Wealth Creation in the Writing of Bernard Mandeville. Intellectual History Review: Vol. 23, No. 2, pp. 187-205. doi: 10.1080/17496977.2012.731142.
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  13. Self-Interest and Sociability.Christian Maurer - 2013 - In James A. Harris (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of British Philosophy in the Eighteenth Century. Oxford University Press. pp. 291-314.
    The chapter analyses the debates on the relation between self-interest and sociability in eighteenth-century British moral philosophy. It focuses on the selfish hypothesis, i.e. on the egoistic theory that we are only motivated by self-interest or self-love, and that our sociability is not based on disinterested affections, such as benevolence. The selfish hypothesis is much debated especially in the early eighteenth century (Mandeville, Shaftesbury, Hutcheson, Butler, Clarke, Campbell, Gay), and then rather tacitly accepted (Hartley, Tucker, Paley) or rejected (Hume, Smith, (...)
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  14. Mandeville and Hume: Anatomists of Civil Society.Iain McDaniel - 2013 - Intellectual History Review 23 (4):593-594.
  15. Mandeville, Bernard.Phyllis Vandenberg & Abigail DeHart - 2013 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Bernard Mandeville (1670-1733) Bernard Mandeville is primarily remembered for his impact on discussions of morality and economic theory in the early eighteenth century. His most noteworthy and notorious work is The Fable of the Bees, which triggered immense public criticism at the time. He had a particular influence on philosophers of the Scottish Enlightenment, most […].
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  16. The Fables of Pity: Rousseau, Mandeville and the Animal-Fable.Sean Gaston - 2012 - Derrida Today 5 (1):21-38.
    Prompted by Derrida's work on the animal-fable in eighteenth-century debates about political power, this article examines the role played by the fiction of the animal in thinking of pity as either a natural virtue (in Rousseau's Second Discourse) or as a natural passion (in Mandeville's The Fable of the Bees). The war of fables between Rousseau and Mandeville – and their hostile reception by Samuel Johnson and Adam Smith – reinforce that the animal-fable illustrates not so much the proper of (...)
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  17. Du Châtelet, Voltaire, and the Transformation of Mandeville's Fable.Felicia Gottmann - 2012 - History of European Ideas 38 (2):218-232.
    Summary In about 1735, Emilie Du Châtelet began to translate Mandeville's Fable of the Bees. Her work, which is largely ignored by scholars, did, as this article demonstrates, turn out to be one of transformation rather than of translation and came at a crucial moment in the emerging French luxury debate. So far commercial society and luxury had been defended in purely economic terms, for instance in Melon's Essai politique, or as an aspect of divine providence for fallen man, by (...)
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  18. Hipocresía. Apología paradójica de un Mal menor.Diana Rosario - 2012 - Signos Filosóficos 14 (28):9-29.
    Después de un breve excursus histórico, absolutamente no exhaustivo, pero dirigido a entender el significado del término hipocresía dentro de algunos autores, me concentro en su defensa paradójica. Paradójica porque, a pesar de ser moralmente reprochable, la actitud hipócrita preserva la integridad ..
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  19. Berkeley E Mandeville: Religião E Moralidade.Antonio Carlos dos Santos - 2011 - Filosofia Unisinos 12 (1):56-69.
  20. The Egerton Version of Mandeville's Travels. [REVIEW]Iain Macleod Higgins - 2011 - Speculum 86 (4):1123-1125.
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  21. The Impartial Spectator, Amour-Propre, and Consequences of the Secular Gaze: Rousseau's and Adam Smith's Responses to Mandeville.Nigel Joseph - 2011 - Lumen: Selected Proceedings From the Canadian Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies 30:33.
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  22. 7. The Disfiguration of Enlightenment: War, Trauma, and the Historical Novel in Godwin’s Mandeville.Tilottama Rajan - 2011 - In Victoria Myers & Robert Maniquis (eds.), Godwinian Moments: From the Enlightenment to Romanticism. University of Toronto Press. pp. 172-193.
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  23. Berkeley and Mandeville: Religion and Morality.Antonio Carlos dos Santos - 2011 - Filosofia Unisinos 12 (1):56-69.
    The purpose of this text is to analyze the debate between Berkeley’s Alciphron and Mandeville’s The fable of the bees and Letter to Dion, focusing on the questions indirectly raised by Berkeley to his opponent: Would there be a place for religion in Mandeville’s society or in his social, political and economic system? If so, what role would it play? Without religion, on what foundations would morality in social life be based? Key words: Berkeley, Mandeville, morality.
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  24. Mandeville.Mauro Simonazzi - 2011 - Carocci.
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  25. Matters of Fact.Matthew L. Jones - 2010 - Modern Intellectual History 7 (3):629-642.
    At the end of Matters of Exchange , Harold Cook's major revisionist account of the early modern scientific revolution, he locates the political and economic writings of Bernard Mandeville within the practices and values of contemporaneous Dutch observational medicine. Like Mandeville, Cook describes the potency of early modern capitalism and its attendant value system in generating industry and knowledge; like Mandeville, Cook finds coercive systems of moral regulation to be mistaken in their estimation of human capacities; and like Mandeville, Cook (...)
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  26. Mandeville dans l''Alciphron'.Eléonore Le Jallé - 2010 - In Laurent Jaffro, Genevieve Brykman & Claire Schwartz (eds.), Berkeley's Alciphron: English Text and Essays in Interpretation. Georg Olms Verlag.
  27. Mandeville’s Ship: Theistic Design and Philosophical History in Charles Darwin’s Vision of Natural Selection.Stephen G. Alter - 2008 - Journal of the History of Ideas 69 (3):441-465.
  28. Bernard Mandeville and the 'Economy' of the Dutch.Alexander Bick - 2008 - Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 1 (1):87-106.
    Studies of Bernard Mandeville by economists and historians ofeconomic thought have focused overwhelmingly on the problem ofsituating his work within the development of the theory of laissez-faireand evaluating his influence on major figures in the ScottishEnlightenment, especially Adam Smith. This paper explores Mandeville’seconomic thought through the lens of a very different transition:England’s rapid growth following the Glorious Revolution and itsgradual eclipse of Dutch economic hegemony. By situating Mandevillewithin an Anglo-Dutch context and carefully examining his commentson the Dutch in Remark Q (...)
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  29. Honour, Face and Reputation in Political Theory.Peter Olsthoorn - 2008 - European Journal of Political Theory 7 (4):472-491.
    Until fairly recently it was not uncommon for political theorists to hold the view that people cannot be expected to act in accordance with the public interest without some incentive. Authors such as Marcus Tullius Cicero, John Locke, David Hume and Adam Smith, for instance, held that people often act in accordance with the public interest, but more from a concern for their honour and reputation than from a concern for the greater good. Today, most authors take a more demanding (...)
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  30. Fable.Georges Van Den Abbeele - 2008 - Historical Materialism 16 (4):233-238.
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  31. Parental Affection and Self-Interest: Mandeville, Hutcheson, and the Question of Natural Benevolence.Patricia Sheridan - 2007 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 24 (4):377 - 392.
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  32. Who Rebutted Bernard Mandeville?Jennifer Welchman - 2007 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 24 (1):57 - 74.
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  33. Egoismo in economia.Sergio Volodia Marcello Cremaschi - 2006 - In Virgilio Melchiorre (ed.), Enciclopedia filosofica. Milano, Italy: Bompiani. pp. 3277-3279.
    A short discussion of the emergence of the self-interest axiom during the classical phase of political economy, its roots in the previous discussion on self-love in early modern ethics and its development in the following formulation of the notion of 'homo economicus' and the definition of the agent's rationality.
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  34. Two Approaches to Self-Love: Hutcheson and Butler.Christian Maurer - 2006 - European Journal of Analytic Philosophy 2 (2):81-96.
    This paper contrasts Frankfurt’s characterisation of self-love as disinterested with the predominant 18th-century view on self-love as interested. Ttwo senses of the term ‘interest’ are distinguished to discuss two fundamentally different readings of the claim that self-love promotes the agent’s interest. This allows characterising two approaches to self-love, which are found in Hutcheson’s and in Bbutler’s writings. Hutcheson sees self-love as a source of hedonistic motives, which can be calm or passionate. Bbutler sees it as a general affection of rational (...)
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  35. Business is One Thing, Ethics is Another: Revisiting Bernard Mandeville's The Fable of the Bees.George Bragues - 2005 - Business Ethics Quarterly 15 (2):179-203.
    Recent corporate scandals raise an old question anew: is capitalism fundamentally infected by immorality? A now almost forgotten answer to this question was advanced at the dawn of capitalism, an answer that students of business ethics would find profit in considering. In the early eighteenth century, Bernard Mandeville authored The Fable of the Bees, which became notorious in its day for arguing that capitalism created wealth while necessarily relying on vicious impulses. The fundamental dilemma is that morality requires self-denial while (...)
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  36. Business is One Thing, Ethics is Another: Revisiting Bernard Mandeville’s The Fable of the Bees.George Bragues - 2005 - Business Ethics Quarterly 15 (2):179-203.
    Recent corporate scandals raise an old question anew: is capitalism fundamentally infected by immorality? A now almost forgotten answer to this question was advanced at the dawn of capitalism, an answer that students of business ethics would find profit in considering. In the early eighteenth century, Bernard Mandeville authored The Fable of the Bees, which became notorious in its day for arguing that capitalism created wealth while necessarily relying on vicious impulses. The fundamental dilemma is that morality requires self-denial while (...)
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  37. Vita E Qualità Della Vita: Saggio Su Mandeville.Gaetano Vittone - 2005 - Rubbettino.
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  38. Burning the Fable of the Bees: The Incendiary Authority of Nature.Danielle Allen - 2004 - In Lorraine Daston & Fernando Vidal (eds.), The Moral Authority of Nature. University of Chicago Press. pp. 74--99.
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  39. The Intellectual Origins of Modern Democratic Republicanism (1660–1720).Jonathan Israel - 2004 - European Journal of Political Theory 3 (1):7-36.
    Arguably, the tradition of democratic republican theory which arose in the Dutch Republic in the years around 1660 in the writings of Johan and Pieter de la Court, Franciscus van den Enden and Spinoza played a decisively important role in the development of modern democratic political theory. The tradition did not end with Spinoza but continued to develop in the United Provinces and–in the work of Bernard Mandeville, who seemingly belongs more to the Dutch than the British republican tradition–in London, (...)
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  40. Le Livre des Merveilles du mondeJean de Mandeville Christiane Deluz.William W. Kibler - 2003 - Speculum 78 (1):212-213.
  41. Sociabilidade e moralidade: Hume leitor de Mandeville.Maria Isabel Limongi - 2003 - Kriterion: Journal of Philosophy 44 (108):224-243.
  42. Character of an Independent Whig—‘Cato’ and Bernard Mandeville.Annie Mitchell - 2003 - History of European Ideas 29 (3):291-311.
    John Trenchard's and Thomas Gordon's ‘Cato’ has generally been seen by historians as the embodiment of neo-Harringtonianism and the polar opposite of Bernard Mandeville's thought. This paper addresses that misreading and places Trenchard and Gordon within a tradition of liberal republican political thought, rather than a civic humanist or neo-roman tradition. It examines the relationship between the political, philosophical and religious beliefs of Trenchard and Gordon and those of Mandeville, arguing that they shared a common framework with respect to the (...)
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  43. The Book of John Mandeville: An Edition of the Pynson Text with Commentary on the Defective VersionTamarah Kohanski John Mandeville.John Scattergood - 2003 - Speculum 78 (4):1330-1332.
  44. Un comentario sobre La fábula de las abejas de Mandeville.María Asunción Gutiérrez López - 2002 - A Parte Rei 23:2.
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  45. Bernard Mandeville.Alex Voorhoeve - 2002 - The Philosophers' Magazine 20:53.
    A short account of the philosopher Bernard Mandeville's key ideas.
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  46. Mandeville, Pope, and Apocalypse.Peter Knox-Shaw - 1st ed. 2015 - In Joaquim Braga & Edmundo Balsemão Pires (eds.), Bernard de Mandeville's Tropology of Paradoxes. Springer Verlag. pp. 79-90.
    Some years before the Scriblerians brought a comic realism to bear on the themes of prophecy and apocalypse, Mandeville gave millenarians a taste of their own medicine by showing – in the conclusion to The Grumbling Hive – that a land free of the offences decried by the pious would indeed prove to be ruinous. In so doing he inaugurated a tradition of secularised apocalypse that finds one of its most famous expressions in the Dunciad. Both Pope and Mandeville make (...)
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  47. Bernard Mandeville and the Therapy of "The Clever Politician".Harold John Cook - 1999 - Journal of the History of Ideas 60 (1):101.
  48. Private Vices, Publick Benefits? The Contemporary Reception of Bernard Mandeville.Eugene Heath - 1999 - Hume Studies 25 (1/2):225-240.
    Of those philosophers that Hume credits with having "begun to put the science of man on a new footing", Bernard Mandeville has received relatively little attention from contemporary philosophers and Hume scholars. In contrast, Mandeville was not so neglected in his own age, a point well-chronicled in F. B. Kaye's introduction to The Fable of the Bees, and substantiated, tangibly, by this collection of writings excellently assembled and edited by J. Martin Stafford. In the eighteenth century and, more particularly, in (...)
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  49. The'Fable of the Bees': Private Vices, Public Benefits (Mandeville).J. Seoane Pinilla - 1999 - Pensamiento 55 (211):145-162.
  50. Private Vices, Public Benefits? The Contemporary Reception of Bernard Mandeville (Reply to Charles Prior's Review).J. M. Stafford - 1999 - History of Political Thought 20 (2):392-392.
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