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  1. The FAIR and CARE Data Principles Influence Who Counts As a Participant in Biodiversity Science by Governing the Fitness-for-Use of Data.Beckett Sterner & Steve Elliott - manuscript
    Biodiversity scientists often describe their field as aiming to save life and humanity, but the field has yet to reckon with the history and contemporary practices of colonialism and systematic racism inherited from natural history. The online data portals scientists use to store and share biodiversity data are a growing class of organizations whose governance can address or perpetuate and further institutionalize the implicit assumptions and inequitable social impacts from this extensive history. In this context, researchers and Indigenous Peoples are (...)
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  2. A philosophy for biodiversity?Jay Odenbaugh - manuscript
    Sahotra Sarkar’s Biodiversity and Environmental Philosophy is a welcome addition to the fields of environmental philosophy and the philosophy of science. First, his book has a rigorous and careful discussion of why we should preserve biodiversity. This is all the more important since much of environmental ethics has rested on normative claims which are unclear in meaning, appear unjustified at best and unjustifiable at worst, and are politically ineffective. Second, Sarkar is at home in the science of conservation biology and (...)
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  3. Making sense of farmland biodiversity management: an evaluation of a farmland biodiversity management communication strategy with farmers.Aoife Leader, James Kinsella & Richard O’Brien - forthcoming - Agriculture and Human Values:1-19.
    Biodiversity is a valuable resource that supports sustainability within agricultural systems, yet in contradiction to this agriculture is recognised as a contributor to biodiversity loss. Agricultural advisory services are institutions that support sustainable agricultural development, employing a variety of approaches including farmer discussion groups in doing so. This study evaluates the impact of a farmland biodiversity management (FBM) communication strategy piloted within Irish farmer discussion groups. A sensemaking lens was applied in this objective to gain an understanding of how this (...)
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  4. The call for a Beloved Community and the challenges of diversity.Daisy L. Machado - forthcoming - Colloquy.
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  5. Toward a Consensus on the Intrinsic Value of Biodiversity.Katie H. Morrow - forthcoming - Environmental Values.
    This paper addresses the stalemate on the question whether biodiversity has intrinsic value. I distinguish between a “weak” conception and two “strong” conceptions of intrinsic value in the environmental ethics literature. The strong conceptions of intrinsic value are connected, respectively, to moral standing and to a strongly objectivist account of value. Neither of these forms of value likely applies to biodiversity. However, the weak conception of intrinsic value is neutral about both moral standing and the nature of value and plausibly (...)
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  6. Ten have, Henk A.M.J. Wounded planet: How Declining Biodiversity Endangers Health and How Bioethics Can Help. John Hopkins University Press. 2019. 376 pp. Hard cover: ISBN: 978-1-4214-2745-4. [REVIEW]Mirko Daniel Garasic - 2024 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 45 (2):155-157.
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  7. The Benefit of Biodiversity – Polemic View of Environmental, Social and Ethical Aspects of Czech Philosophers and Environmentalists.Jan Lípa, Ladislav Rozenský, Petr Ondrušák & Josef Dolista - 2024 - Studia Ecologiae Et Bioethicae 22 (2).
    This text will deal with the issue of the benefit of biodiversity in the polemic context of the works of Czech and Central European philosophers and environmentalists with the essential ideas of selected world thinkers and with environmental practice in Central Europe. To validate this thesis, the authors of this work chose an essay dealing with professional monographs and professional articles on this topic, focusing on the continuity of ideas of the authors of the Central European region. For the comparison, (...)
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  8. Biodiversity and the Digital Transformation.Raisa Mulatinho Simoes & Vicki L. Birchfield - 2024 - Environmental Ethics 46 (1):47-69.
    Taking the regime established by the Convention on Biological Diversity as a foundation, the purpose of this article is twofold. First, it examines how the international biodiversity regime integrates the private property paradigm into its toolbox for conservation and sustainability and then critically evaluates the shortcomings of the intellectual property mechanism. Second, it argues that the increasing ubiquity of open access emerging technologies should lead the international community to carefully assess the benefits for conservation research of reverting to a framework (...)
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  9. Ubuntu Thinking on Biodiversity Loss: The Inadequacies of Egalitarian and Communitarian Solutions.Olusegun Steven Samuel & Rotimi Omosulu - 2024 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 41 (1):145-169.
    This article evaluates the moral implications of two leading theories on biodiversity preservation/conservation (Paul Taylor's biocentric egalitarianism and J. Baird Callicott's holistic communitarianism). Taylor argues for the moral equality of all members of the Earth's community of life, calling for an ethic of respect for nature to conserve biodiversity. Callicott argues for the moral consideration of ecosystems to maintain their integrity, stability, and beauty. The article makes two major claims. First, we need a plausible account of moral egalitarianism to disrupt (...)
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  10. What Timaeus Can Teach Us: The Importance of Plato’s Timaeus in the 21st Century.Douglas R. Campbell - 2023 - Athena 18:58-73.
    In this article, I make the case for the continued relevance of Plato’s Timaeus. I begin by sketching Allan Bloom’s picture of the natural sciences today in The Closing of the American Mind, according to which the natural sciences are, objectionably, increasingly specialized and have ejected humans qua humans from their purview. I argue that Plato’s Timaeus, despite the falsity of virtually all of its scientific claims, provides a model for how we can pursue scientific questions in a comprehensive way (...)
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  11. Bringing Together Species Observations: A Case Story of Sweden’s Biodiversity Informatics Infrastructures.Jesse D. Peterson, Dick Kasperowski & René van der Wal - 2023 - Minerva 61 (2):265-289.
    Biodiversity informatics produces global biodiversity knowledge through the collection and analysis of biodiversity data using informatics techniques. To do so, biodiversity informatics relies upon data accrual, standardization, transferability, openness, and “invisible” infrastructure. What biodiversity informatics mean to society, however, cannot be adequately understood without recognizing what organizes biodiversity data. Using insights from science and technology studies, we story the organizing “visions” behind the growth of biodiversity informatics infrastructures in Sweden—an early adopter of digital technologies and significant contributor to global biodiversity (...)
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  12. Entrevista a Olaff Ludwing Durand Núñez. Orientación educativa para la preservación de la ecología peruana.Jesús Miguel Delgado Del Aguila - 2023 - Argus-A. Artes and Humanidades 13 (49):1-4.
    En esta entrevista, el preservador Olaff Durand narra su experiencia como miembro de una organización ecológica, la cual se ha caracterizado por los cuidados que se han realizado al medioambiente. Estas actividades las han venido haciendo siempre de manera presencial, aunque en tiempo de pandemia se ha recurrido a virtualidad. Sin embargo, la labor y los proyectos ecológicos que él relata demuestran que ha habido un trabajo constante de concientización y de educación ambiental para los ciudadanos. En fin, esta conversación (...)
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  13. A Scale Problem with the Ecosystem Services Argument for Protecting Biodiversity.Katie H. Morrow - 2023 - Environmental Values 32 (3):271-290.
    The ecosystem services argument is a highly publicised instrumental argument for protecting biodiversity. I develop a new objection to this argument based on the lack of a causal connection from global species losses to local ecosystem changes. I survey some alternative formulations of services arguments, including ones incorporating option value or a precautionary principle, and show that they do not fare much better than the standard version. I conclude that environmental thinkers should rely less on ecosystem services as a means (...)
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  14. How Data Governance Principles Influence Participation in Biodiversity Science.Beckett Sterner & Steve Elliott - 2023 - Science as Culture.
    Biodiversity science is in a pivotal period when diverse groups of actors—including researchers, businesses, national governments, and Indigenous Peoples—are negotiating wide-ranging norms for governing and managing biodiversity data in digital repositories. These repositories, often called biodiversity data portals, are a type of organization for which governance can address or perpetuate the colonial history of biodiversity science and current inequities. Researchers and Indigenous Peoples are developing and implementing new strategies to examine and change assumptions about which agents should count as salient (...)
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  15. Unified and pluralistic ideals for data sharing and reuse in biodiversity.Beckett Sterner, Steve Elliott, Ed Gilbert & Nico M. Franz - 2023 - Database 2023 (baad048):baad048.
    How should billions of species observations worldwide be shared and made reusable? Many biodiversity scientists assume the ideal solution is to standardize all datasets according to a single, universal classification and aggregate them into a centralized, global repository. This ideal has known practical and theoretical limitations, however, which justifies investigating alternatives. To support better community deliberation and normative evaluation, we develop a novel conceptual framework showing how different organizational models, regulative ideals and heuristic strategies are combined to form shared infrastructures (...)
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  16. Living fossils and conservation values.Derek Turner & Junhyung Han - 2023 - Frontiers in Earth Science 11.
    Horseshoe crabs (Limulus polyphemus) have been in decline in Long Island Sound, and recently there has been discussion of whether the state of Connecticut should stop issuing licenses for commercial harvesting. This paper argues that in spite of concerns about the living fossil concept, the fact that the horseshoe crabs are living fossils should count in favor of more stringent protection. The paper distinguishes four different views about the status of the living fossil concept: 1) eliminativism; 2) redefinition; 3) reframing; (...)
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  17. Biyoçeşitlilik: Ne, Niçin, Nasıl?Mustafa Yavuz - 2023 - Akademik Düşünce Dergisi 1 (7):3-20.
    The term biodiversity, also known as the diversity of life, is often used to mean the diversity of the living beings in the biosphere. By diversity of the living beings, it is meant mostly living things as individuals. In addition, it is possible to discuss the diversity of species, ecosystems, and hereditary characteristics. In this study, answers were sought to questions such as ‘Is biodiversity a value, can it be measured, what does it mean for our country and the world, (...)
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  18. Biodiversity.Noëlle Zendrera - 2023 - In Nathanaël Wallenhorst & Christoph Wulf (eds.), Handbook of the Anthropocene. Springer. pp. 213-218.
    Ecology is a science which has become indispensable when thinking about the future of humanity and biodiversity on Earth. In this paper we will recall the links between Diversity, Information, Energy, Matter and the scientific input from Doctor Ramon Margalef (Investigación pesquera 3:99–106, 1956; The American Naturalist 97:357–374, 1963). For a long time science has worked hard to reach an estimate of unknown biodiversity. In this “Anthropocene” era (Crutzen, Nature 415:23, 2002), humans realize that the biosphere and biodiversity are in (...)
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  19. Ethics in Biodiversity Conservation.Patrik Baard - 2022 - London and New York: Routledge.
    This book examines the role of ethics and philosophy in biodiversity conservation. The objective of this book is two-fold: on the one hand it offers a detailed and systematic account of central normative concepts often used, but rarely explicated nor justified, within conservation biology. Such concepts include 'values', 'rights', and 'duties'. The second objective is to emphasize to environmental philosophers and applied ethicists the many interesting decision-making challenges of biodiversity conservation. The book argues that a nuanced account of instrumental values (...)
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  20. Ethical Analysis of the Application of Assisted Reproduction Technologies in Biodiversity Conservation and the Case of White Rhinoceros ( Ceratotherium simum ) Ovum Pick-Up Procedures.Pierfrancesco Biasetti - 2022 - Frontiers in Veterinary Science 9.
    Originally applied on domestic and lab animals, assisted reproduction technologies (ARTs) have also found application in conservation breeding programs, where they can make the genetic management of populations more efficient, and increase the number of individuals per generation. However, their application in wildlife conservation opens up new ethical scenarios that have not yet been fully explored. This study presents a frame for the ethical analysis of the application of ART procedures in conservation based on the Ethical Matrix (EM), and discusses (...)
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  21. Biodiversity vs. paleodiversity measurements: the incommensurability problem.Federica Bocchi - 2022 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 12 (4):1-24.
    Estimating whether the Earth’s biota is in the middle of a crisis relies heavily on comparisons between present and past data about biodiversity or biodiversity surrogates. Although the past is a crucial source of information to assess the severity of the current biodiversity crisis, substantive conceptual and methodological questions remain about how paleodiversity and biodiversity are to be properly compared. I argue that to justify claims of a current biodiversity crisis is harder than it appears. More precisely, I claim that (...)
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  22. A Convivialist Solution for the Multiple Crisis of Biodiversity, Climate, and Public Health.Tanja Busse - 2022 - In Frank Adloff & Alain Caillé (eds.), Convivial Futures: Views From a Post-Growth Tomorrow. Transcript Verlag. pp. 127-138.
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  23. Paying Attention to Biodiversity and Its Theological Significance.Celia Deane-Drummond - 2022 - New Blackfriars 103 (1104):171-188.
    New Blackfriars, Volume 103, Issue 1104, Page 171-188, March 2022.
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  24. Science and values in the biodiversity-ecosystem function debate.David M. Frank - 2022 - Biology and Philosophy 37 (2):1-22.
    This paper explores interactions between ecological science and conservation values in the biodiversity-ecosystem function debate of the 1990–2000s. The scientific debate concerned the interpretation of observed correlations between species richness and ecosystem properties like primary productivity in experimental ecosystems. The debate over the causal or explanatory role of species richness was presumed to have implications for conservation policy, and the use of such research to support policy recommendations generated hostility between rival groups of ecologists. I argue that the debate was (...)
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  25. “Famine Foods” and the Values of Biodiversity Preservation in Israel-Palestine.Courtney Fullilove - 2022 - Isis 113 (3):625-636.
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  26. Demystifying narratives about loss of biodiversity: Helen Anne Curry: Endangered maize: industrial agriculture and the crisis of extinction. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2022, xii + 321 pp, $85.00 HB. [REVIEW]Jacob Darwin Hamblin - 2022 - Metascience 31 (2):277-280.
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  27. Biodiversity communication at the UN Summit 2020: Blending business and nature.Merel Keijzer, Janet Fuller & Matt Drury - 2022 - Discourse and Communication 16 (1):37-57.
    Biodiverse ecosystems play a key role in maintaining life on earth. In response to rapid declines in biodiversity throughout the world, the UN Biodiversity Summit 2020 brought together world leaders to discuss potential solutions. We draw on cognitive linguistics, critical discourse analysis and ecolinguistics in analysing the summit contributions. All speakers blended vocabulary from the fields of BUSINESS and NATURE; in doing so, they were able to advocate solving biodiversity loss by implementing approaches commonly found in business. In addition, three (...)
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  28. African Worldviews, Biodiversity Conservation and Sustainable Development.Workineh Kelbessa - 2022 - Environmental Values 31 (5):575-598.
    This paper explores the role of African worldviews in biodiversity conservation and sustainable development. African worldviews recognise the interdependence and interconnectedness of human beings, animals, plants and the natural world. Although it is not always the case that what one does depends on what one thinks and believes, indigenous African people's ideas and beliefs about the human-nature relationship have influenced what they have done in and to nature. In African worldviews, the present generation has moral obligations to the ancestors and (...)
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  29. Customary Norms, General Principles of International Environmental Law, and Assisted Migration as a Tool for Biodiversity Adaptation to Climate Change.Maksim Lavrik - 2022 - Jus Cogens 4 (2):99-129.
    Assisted migration (AM) is a translocation of the representatives of species to areas outside their natural habitats as a response to climate change. This article seeks to identify how customary norms and general principles of international environmental law could guide the development of regulation of AM maximizing the benefits of using AM and minimizing AM-related risks. Among the customary norms and principles of international environmental law discussed in the article and relevant to the regulation of AM are the permanent sovereignty (...)
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  30. Cultural biodiversity unpacked, separating discourse from practice.Mariagiulia Mariani, Claire Cerdan & Iuri Peri - 2022 - Agriculture and Human Values 39 (2):773-789.
    In this article, we question to what extent origin-food labels, namely Geographical Indications and Slow Food Presidia, may effectively account for cultural biodiversity. Building on Foucault’s discourse theory, we question how the Slow Food movement and GI promoters have developed their own discourse and practice on CB, how these discourses contrast, and how they inform projects. Focusing on the practices to cultivate the microbiological life of three origin labeled cheeses, we have revealed the gap between these institutional discourses and what (...)
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  31. Concepts of Biodiversity, Pluralism, and Pragmatism: The Case of Walnut Forest Conservation in Central Asia.Elena Popa - 2022 - SATS 23 (1):97-116.
    This paper examines philosophical debates about concepts of biodiversity, making the case for conceptual pluralism. Taking a pragmatist perspective, I argue that normative concepts of biodiversity and eco-centric concepts of biodiversity can serve different purposes. The former would help stress the values of local communities, which have often been neglected by both early scientific approaches to conservation, and by policy makers prioritizing the political or economic interests of specific groups. The latter would help build local research programs independent of pressures (...)
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  32. Values in Science, Biodiversity Research, and the Problem of Particularity.Tobias Schönwitz - 2022 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 32 (1):69-101.
    How to deal with non-epistemic values in science presents a pressing problem for science and society as well as for philosophers of science. In recent years, accounts of democratizing science have been proposed as a possible solution to this. By providing a case study on the establishment of the Intergovernmental Science-Policy comment: Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services comment: (IPBES), I argue that such accounts run into a problem when values are embedded in the general scientific and societal setup to (...)
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  33. Otherness-based Reasons for the Protection of (Bio)Diversity.Anna Wienhues & Anna Deplazes Zemp - 2022 - Environmental Ethics (2):161-184.
    Different arguments in favor of the moral relevance of the concept of biodiversity (e.g., in terms of its intrinsic or instrumental value) face a range of serious difficulties, despite that biodiversity constitutes a central tenet of many environmentalist practices and beliefs. That discrepancy is considerable for the debate on potential moral reasons for protecting biodiversity. This paper adds a new angle by focusing on the potential of the concept of natural otherness—specifically individual and process otherness in nature—for providing additional moral (...)
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  34. Continuing After Species: An Afterword.Robert A. Wilson - 2022 - In John S. Wilkins, Igor Pavlinov & Frank Zachos (eds.), Species Problems and Beyond: Contemporary Issues in Philosophy and Practice. New York: Routledge. pp. 343-353.
    This afterword to Species and Beyond provides some reflections on species, with special attention to what I think the most significant developments have been in the thinking of biologists and philosophers working on species over the past 25 years, as well as some bad jokes.
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  35. Call for emergency action to limit global temperature increases, restore biodiversity and protect health.Lukoye Atwoli, Abdullah H. Baqui, Thomas Benfield, Raffaella Bosurgi, Fiona Godlee, Stephen Hancocks, Richard Horton, Laurie Laybourn-Langton, Carlos Augusto Monteiro, Ian Norman, Kirsten Patrick, Nigel Praities, Marcel G. M. Olde Rikkert, Eric J. Rubin, Peush Sahni, Richard Smith, Nicholas J. Talley, Sue Turale & Damián Vázquez - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (12):1-1.
    > Wealthy nations must do much more, much faster. The United Nations General Assembly in September 2021 will bring countries together at a critical time for marshalling collective action to tackle the global environmental crisis. They will meet again at the biodiversity summit in Kunming, China, and the climate conference 26) in Glasgow, UK. Ahead of these pivotal meetings, we—the editors of health journals worldwide—call for urgent action to keep average global temperature increases below 1.5°C, halt the destruction of nature (...)
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  36. Biodiversity databanks and scientific exploration.Anouk Barberousse - 2021 - Lato Sensu: Revue de la Société de Philosophie des Sciences 8 (2):32-43.
    For several decades now, biologists have been developing digital databanks, which are remarkable scientific instruments allowing scientists to accelerate the development of biological knowledge. From the beginnings of the Human Genome Project (HGP) onwards, genetic databanks have been a major component of current biological knowledge, and biodiversity databanks have also been developed in the wake of the HGP. The purpose of this paper is to identify the specific features of biodiversity data and databanks, and to point out their contribution to (...)
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  37. What Is Biodiversity and Why Should It Be Protected?Dieter Birnbacher - 2021 - In Anne Siegetsleitner, Andreas Oberprantacher, Marie-Luisa Frick & Ulrich Metschl (eds.), Crisis and Critique: Philosophical Analysis and Current Events: Proceedings of the 42nd International Wittgenstein Symposium. Boston: De Gruyter. pp. 317-330.
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  38. The Concept of Milieu in Environmental Ethics, Individual Responsibility within and Interconnected World.Layna Droz - 2021 - Routledge.
    The Concept of Milieu in Environmental Ethics discusses how we can come together to address current environmental problems at the planetary level, such as climate change, biodiversity loss, transborder pollution and desertification. -/- The book recognises the embedded individual sociocultural and environmental contexts that impact our everyday choices. It asks, in this pluralism of worldviews, how can we build common ground to tackle environmental issues? What is our individual moral responsibility within the larger collaborative challenge? Through philosophical reasoning, this book (...)
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  39. How the diversity of human concepts of nature affects conservation of biodiversity.Frédéric Ducarme, Fabrice Flipo & Denis Couvet - 2021 - Conservation Biology 35 (3):1019-1028.
    Protecting nature has become a global concern. However, the very idea of nature is problematic. We examined the etymological and semantic diversity of the word used to translate nature in a conservation context in 76 of the primary languages of the world to identify the different relationships between humankind and nature. Surprisingly, the number of morphemes (distinct etymological roots) used by 7 billion people was low. Different linguistic superfamilies shared the same etymon across large cultural areas that correlate with the (...)
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  40. The algorithmic turn in conservation biology: Characterizing progress in ethically-driven sciences.James Justus & Samantha Wakil - 2021 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 88 (C):181-192.
    As a discipline distinct from ecology, conservation biology emerged in the 1980s as a rigorous science focused on protecting biodiversity. Two algorithmic breakthroughs in information processing made this possible: place-prioritization algorithms and geographical information systems. They provided defensible, data-driven methods for designing reserves to conserve biodiversity that obviated the need for largely intuitive and highly problematic appeals to ecological theory at the time. But the scientific basis of these achievements and whether they constitute genuine scientific progress has been criticized. We (...)
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  41. Invasive species increase biodiversity and, therefore, services: An argument of equivocations.Christopher Lean - 2021 - Conservation Science and Practice 553.
    Some critics of invasion biology have argued the invasion of ecosystems by nonindigenous species can create more valuable ecosystems. They consider invaded communities as more valuable because they potentially produce more ecosystem services. To establish that the introduction of nonindigenous species creates more valuable ecosystems, they defend that value is provisioned by ecosystem services. These services are derived from ecosystem productivity, the production and cycling of resources. Ecosystem productivity is a result of biodiversity, which is understood as local species richness. (...)
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  42. Éthique et pandémie : La covid-19 dans une perspective de philosophie pratique.Alain Létourneau - 2021 - Les Ateliers de l'Éthique / the Ethics Forum 16 (1):18-40.
    Alain Létourneau L’actualité et le quotidien ont été progressivement monopolisés par la pandémie qui a fait surface à la fin de l’année 2019, en raison de son urgence et de sa gravité. L’on commencera par se demander comment les sciences nous permettent de la comprendre et pourquoi ce sont certaines sciences en particulier qui ont pris l’avant-plan. En réfléchissant aux questions relevant de la biodiversité et des rapports entre les humains et leurs divers contextes écosystémiques, il devient possible de reposer (...)
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  43. Universities Betray Reason and as a Result Betray Humanity.Nicholas Maxwell - 2021 - Journal Of Anthropological And Archaeological Sciences 4 (5):562-564.
    If universities sought to help promote human welfare rationally, they would give intellectual priority to the tasks of articulating problems of living, and proposing and critically assessing possible solutions, possible actions. Priority would be given to public education about what our problems are, and what we need to do about them. Universities do not remotely proceed in this way. Why not? Because they are dominated by the idea that knowledge must first be acquired; once acquired, it then can be applied (...)
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  44. vad gör en växt främmande? – Några olika perspektiv.Erik Persson - 2021 - In Johanna Alkan Olsson, Helena Hanson, Erik Persson, Carina Sjöholm & Niklas Vareman (eds.), Växtvärk - Perspektiv på invasiva främmande växter i svensk natur. pp. 31-42.
  45. Who owns the taste of coffee – examining implications of biobased means of production in food.Zoë Robaey & Cristian Timmermann - 2021 - In Hanna Schübel & Ivo Wallimann-Helmer (eds.), Justice and food security in a changing climate. Wageningen Academic Publishers. pp. 85-90.
    Synthetic foods advocates offer the promise of efficient, reliable, and sustainable food production. Engineered organisms become factories to produce food. Proponents claim that through this technique important barriers can be eliminated which would facilitate the production of traditional foods outside their climatic range. This technique would allow reducing food miles, secure future supply, and maintain quality and taste expectations. In this paper, we examine coffee production via biobased means. A startup called Atomo Coffee aims to produce synthetic coffee with the (...)
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  46. Impact of Covid-19 Pandemic on Environment and Biodiversity.S. K. Srivastava & Mukul Sinha - 2021 - In Verma (ed.), COVID-19 SECOND WAVE: CHALLENGES FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT. Prayagraj: ABRF. pp. 122-125.
    The ongoing pandemic caused by COVID-19 virus has paralysed everyday life across the globe. To limit spread of infection, the Government of various countries issued a Nation-wide lockdown, with increase in COVID cases, more and more biomedical wastes were also produced. With a halt in manufacturing industries and automobiles plying, air pollution levels drops drastically and rare animal sightings were recorded by the media. Water Pollution levels were also recorded to be on the down trend.
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  47. Bats, objectivity, and viral spillover risk.Beckett Sterner, Steve Elliott, Nate Upham & Nico Franz - 2021 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 43 (1):1-5.
    What should the best practices be for modeling zoonotic disease risks, e.g. to anticipate the next pandemic, when background assumptions are unsettled or evolving rapidly? This challenge runs deeper than one might expect, all the way into how we model the robustness of contemporary phylogenetic inference and taxonomic classifications. Different and legitimate taxonomic assumptions can destabilize the putative objectivity of zoonotic risk assessments, thus potentially supporting inconsistent and overconfident policy decisions.
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  48. The "history" of biodiversity. A Bergsonian look at the theory of evolution.Mathilde Tahar - 2021 - Thaumàzein 8:89-106.
    Neo-Darwinism, through the combination of natural selection and genetics, has made possible an explanation of adaptive phenomena that claims to be devoid of metaphysical presuppositions. What Bergson already deplored and what we explore in this paper is the implicit finalism of such evolutionary explanations, which turn living beings into closed and static systems rather than understanding biological evolution as a process characterized by its interactions and temporal openness. Without denying the heuristic efficiency of the explanation resting upon natural selection, we (...)
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  49. Agri(cultural) resistance : food sovereignty and anarchism in response to the socio-biodiversity crisis.Cassidy Thomas & Leonardo E. Figueroa-Helland - 2021 - In Martin Locret-Collet, Simon Springer, Jennifer Mateer & Maleea Acker (eds.), Inhabiting the Earth: anarchist political ecology for landscapes of emancipation. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield.
  50. Traditional Ecological Knowledge and Global Pandemics: Biodiversity and Planetary Health Beyond Covid-19.Ngozi Finette Unuigbe - 2021 - Routledge.
    This book demonstrates the importance and potential role of Traditional Ecological Knowledge in foreseeing and curbing future global pandemics. The reduction of species diversity has increased the risk of global pandemics and it is therefore not only imperative to articulate and disseminate knowledge on the linkages between human activities and the transmission of viruses to humans, but also to create policy pathways for operationalizing that knowledge to help solve future problems. Although this book has been prompted by the COVID-19 pandemic, (...)
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