Biomedical Ethics

Edited by L. Syd M Johnson (SUNY Upstate Medical University)
Assistant editor: Tyler John (Longview Philanthropy)
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History/traditions: Biomedical Ethics

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  1. The Ethical Anatomy of Payment for Research Participants.Joanna Różyńska - forthcoming - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy.
    In contrast to most publications on the ethics of paying research subjects, which start by identifying and analyzing major ethical concerns raised by the practice and end with a set of—more or less well-justified—ethical recommendations for using payment schemes immune to these problems, this paper offers a systematic, principle-based ethical analysis of the practice. It argues that researchers have a prima facie moral obligation to offer payment to research subjects, which stems from the principle of social beneficence. This principle constitutes (...)
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  2. Wrong Question and the Wrong Standard of Proof.Marc Lipsitch - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (6):378-379.
    I have two concerns about Pugh et al ’s case that vaccine requirements without a natural immunity exception are unjustified.1 First, the scientific question they suggest must be answered to justify the policy is in my view the wrong one, or at least not the only relevant one. Second, the authors set up a standard for public health regulation that will be often unattainable, risking paralysis of public health authorities. Pugh et al suggest two legitimate bases for vaccine mandates: ‘the (...)
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  3. Endosex.Morgan Carpenter, Katharine B. Dalke & Brian D. Earp - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2022-108317.
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  4. Research Ethics and Public Trust in Vaccines: The Case of COVID-19 Challenge Trials.Nir Eyal - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2021-108086.
    Despite their clearly demonstrated safety and effectiveness, approved vaccines against COVID-19 are commonly mistrusted. Nations should find and implement effective ways to boost vaccine confidence. But the implications for ethical vaccine development are less straightforward than some have assumed. Opponents of COVID-19 vaccine challenge trials, in particular, made speculative or empirically implausible warnings on this matter, some of which, if applied consistently, would have ruled out most COVID-19 vaccine trials and many non-pharmaceutical responses.
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  5. Bioethics to the Rescue! A Response to Emmerich.Douglas Hardman & Phil Hutchinson - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2022-108304.
    In our article, Where the ethical action is, we argue that medical and ethical modes of thought are not different in kind but merely different aspects of a clinical situation. In response, Emmerich argues that in so doing, we neglect several important features of healthcare and medical education. Although we applaud the spirit of Emmerich’s response, we argue that his critique is an attempt at a general defence of the value of bioethical expertise in clinical practice, rather than a specific (...)
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  6. Risk-Relativity is Still a Nonsense.Neil John Pickering, Giles Newton-Howes & Simon Walker - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2022-108379.
    In this short response to Gray’s article Capacity and Decision Making we double down on our argument that risk-relativity is a nonsense. Risk relativity is the claim that we should set a higher standard of competence for a person to make a risky choice than to make a safe choice. Gray’s response largely involves calling attention to the complexities, ramifications and multiple value implications of decision-making, but we do not deny any of this. Using the notion of quality of care (...)
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  7. Two Kinds of Embryo Research: Four Case Examples.Julian Savulescu, Markus Labude, Capucine Barcellona, Zhongwei Huang, Michael Karl Leverentz, Vicki Xafis & Tamra Lysaght - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2021-108038.
    There are ethical obligations to conduct research that contributes to generalisable knowledge and improves reproductive health, and this should include embryo research in jurisdictions where it is permitted. Often, the controversial nature of embryo research can alarm ethics committee members, which can unnecessarily delay important research that can potentially improve fertility for patients and society. Such delay is ethically unjustified. Moreover, countries such as the UK, Australia and Singapore have legislation which unnecessarily captures low-risk research, such as observational research, in (...)
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  8. Clinical Law: What Do Clinicians Want to Know? The Demography of Clinical Law.Robert Wheeler & Nigel Hall - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2022-108131.
    This is the first description of the questions that clinicians ask a department of clinical law, relating to the legal rules applicable to the care of their patients.ObjectivesTo describe in detail the demography of clinical legal enquiries made by clinicians of all professions concerning the care of their patients. To collate and categorise the varieties of enquiry, to identify phenotypic patterns. To provide colleges, regulators, commissioners, educators and the NHS with an insight into hitherto undescribed subject matter, better to understand (...)
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  9. Directed and Conditional Uterus Donation.Elizabeth Chloe Romanis & Jordan A. Parsons - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2021-107902.
    Uterus transplantation is highly anticipated for the benefits that it might bring to individuals wanting to carry a pregnancy in order to reproduce who do not have a functioning uterus. The surgery—now having been performed successfully in several countries around the world—remains experimental. However, UTx is at some point expected to become a routine treatment for people without a uterus and considering themselves in need of one: women with absolute uterine factor infertility; transgender women; and even cisgender men who wish (...)
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  10. ‘Climate Change Mitigation is a Hot Topic, but Not When It Comes to Hospitals’: A Qualitative Study on Hospital Stakeholders’ Perception and Sense of Responsibility for Greenhouse Gas Emissions.Claudia Quitmann, Rainer Sauerborn, Ina Danquah & Alina Herrmann - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2021-107971.
    ObjectivePhysical and mental well-being are threatened by climate change. Since hospitals in high-income countries contribute significantly to climate change through their greenhouse gas emissions, the medical ethics imperative of ‘do no harm’ imposes a responsibility on hospitals to decarbonise. We investigated hospital stakeholders’ perceptions of hospitals’ GHG emissions sources and the sense of responsibility for reducing GHG emissions in a hospital.MethodsWe conducted 29 semistructured qualitative expert interviews at one of Germany’s largest hospitals, Heidelberg University Hospital. Five patients, 12 clinical and (...)
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  11. Surgery Should Be Routinely Videoed.Edwin Jesudason - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2022-108171.
    Video recording is widely available in modern operating rooms. Here, I argue that, if patient consent and suitable technology are in place, video recording of surgery is an ethical duty. I develop this as a duty to protect, arguing for professional and institutional duties, as distinguished for duties of rescue.A professional duty to protect is described in mental healthcare. Practitioners have to take reasonable steps to prevent serious, foreseeable harm to their clients and others, even if that entails a non-consensual (...)
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  12. Imagination and Idealism in the Medical Sciences of an Ageing World.Colin Farrelly - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2022-108129.
    Imagination and idealism are particularly important creative epistemic virtues for the medical sciences if we hope to improve the health of the world’s ageing population. To date, imagination and idealism within the medical sciences have been dominated by a paradigm of disease control, a paradigm which has realised significant, but also limited, success. Disease control proved particularly successful in mitigating the early-life mortality risks from infectious diseases, but it has proved less successful when applied to the chronic diseases of late (...)
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  13. Health Disparities From Pandemic Policies: Reply to Critics.Nancy S. Jecker - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2022-108295.
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  14. At the Dawn of a Great Transition: The Question of Radical Enhancement. Blackford, Russell. Basel: Schwabe Verlag, 2021. 203 Pp. ISBN 9783796541896. $146.00. (Hardback). [REVIEW]Nicholas Agar - forthcoming - Bioethics.
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  15. Kingdoms, Priests and Handmaidens: Bioethics and its Culture.Stephen Richards - 2022 - The New Bioethics 28 (2):152-167.
    Central to this essay is the understanding that varied communities may have an inherent and unrecognised culture of their own and this culture may be detrimental to their core. Bioethics constitute...
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  16. Suicide Risk Assessments: A Scientific and Ethical Critique.Mike Smith - forthcoming - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-13.
    There are widely held premises that suicide is almost exclusively the result of mental illness and there is “strong evidence for successfully detecting and managing suicidality in healthcare”. In this context, ‘zero-suicide’ policies have emerged, and suicide risk assessment tools have become a normative component of psychiatric practice. This essay discusses how suicide evolved from a moral to a medical problem and how, in an effort to reduce suicide, a paternalistic healthcare response emerged to predict those at high risk. The (...)
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  17. Bioethics: An International, Morally Diverse, and Often Political Endeavor.Mark J. Cherry - forthcoming - HEC Forum:1-12.
    Bioethicists often remind health care professionals to pay close attention to issues of diversity and inclusion. Approaches to ethics consultation, where the perspective of the bioethicist is taken to be more morally correct or necessarily authoritative, have been critiqued as inappropriately authoritarian. Despite such apparent recognition of the importance of respecting moral diversity and the inclusion of different viewpoints, authoritarianism is all too often the approach adopted, especially as bioethics has shifted evermore into concerns for public policy. Yet, secular values (...)
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  18. Medicine and Shariah: A Dialogue in Islamic Bioethics Aasim I. Padela. Notre Dame: University of Notre Dame Press, 2021. 312 Pp. ISBN‐13: ‎978‐0268108373; ISBN‐10: ‎0268108374. [REVIEW]Kiarash Aramesh - forthcoming - Wiley: Developing World Bioethics.
  19. Ethics Briefing.Martin Davies, Sophie Brannan, Veronica English, Caroline Ann Harrison, Carrie Reidinger & Julian C. Sheather - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (6):427-428.
    On 7 April 2022 – coinciding with World Health Day – the British Medical Association launched its new report, Health and human rights in the new world order.1 Written during the global upheaval triggered by the COVID-19 pandemic, and published just weeks after the Russian invasion of Ukraine, the report responds to a range of emerging and intensifying threats to health-related human rights globally. As the report establishes, human rights in health and healthcare matter because human suffering, and its relief, (...)
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  20. In Defence of Our Model for Just Healthcare Systems: Why an Explicit Philosophy is Needed in Addition to the Law, and How Scanlon Helps Derive Just Policies.Caitríona L. Cox & Zoë Fritz - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (6):416-418.
    In a recent response to our paper on developing a philosophical framework to guide the design and delivery of a just health service, Sarela raises several objections. We feel that although Sarela makes points which are worthy of discussion, his critique does not undermine either the need for, or the worth of, our proposed model. First, the law does not negate the need for ethics in determining just healthcare policy. Reliance on legal processes can drive inappropriate focus on ensuring policies (...)
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  21. Rawlsian Justice in Healthcare: A Response to Cox and Fritz.Abeezar I. Sarela - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (6):413-415.
    Cox and Fritz state the central problem as the absence of a framework for healthcare policy decisions; but, they overlook the theoretical underpinnings of public law. In response, they propose a two-step procedure to guide fair decision-making. The first step relies on Thomas Scanlon’s ‘contractualism’ for stakeholders to consider whether, or not, they could reasonably reject policy proposals made by others; then in the second step, John Rawls’s principles of justice are applied to these proposals; a fair policy requires to (...)
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  22. Framework for Evaluation Research on Clinical Ethical Case Interventions: The Role of Ethics Consultants.Joschka Haltaufderheide, Stephan Nadolny, Jochen Vollmann & Jan Schildmann - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (6):401-406.
    Evaluation of clinical ethical case consultations has been discussed as an important research task in recent decades. A rigid framework of evaluation is essential to improve quality of consultations and, thus, quality of patient care. Different approaches to evaluate those services appropriately and to determine adequate empirical endpoints have been proposed. A key challenge is to provide an answer to the question as to which empirical endpoints—and for what reasons—should be considered when evaluating the quality of a service. In this (...)
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  23. Moral Status of the Fetus and the Permissibility of Abortion: A Contractarian Response to Thomson’s Violinist Thought Experiment.Matthew John Minehan - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (6):407-410.
    Judith Jarvis Thomson famously argued that abortion is permissible even if we accept that a fetus qualifies as a person and possesses a right to life. The current paper presents two arguments that undermine Thomson’s position. First, the paper sketches a contractarian argument that explores Thomson’s violinist thought experiment from behind a veil of ignorance, which suggests that if we had an equal likelihood of being an unwanted fetus and a pregnant woman, it would be rational for us to oppose (...)
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  24. Beyond Individualisation: Towards a More Contextualised Understanding of Women’s Social Egg Freezing Experiences.Michiel De Proost, Gily Coene, Julie Nekkebroeck & Veerle Provoost - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (6):386-390.
    Recently, Petersen provided in this journal a critical discussion of individualisation arguments in the context of social egg freezing. This argument underlines the idea that it is morally problematic to use individual technological solutions to solve societal challenges that women face. So far, however, there is a lack of empirical data to contextualise his central normative claim that individualisation arguments are implausible. This article discusses an empirical study that supports a contextualised reading of the normative work of Petersen. Based on (...)
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  25. Should Healthcare Workers Be Prioritised During the COVID-19 Pandemic? A View From Madrid and New York.Diego Real de Asua & Joseph J. Fins - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (6):397-400.
    While COVID-19 has generated a massive burden of illness worldwide, healthcare workers have been disproportionately exposed to SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus infection. During the so-called ‘first wave’, infection rates among this population group have ranged between 10% and 20%, raising as high as one in every four COVID-19 patients in Spain at the peak of the crisis. Now that many countries are already dealing with new waves of COVID-19 cases, a potential competition between HCW and non-HCW patients for scarce resources can still (...)
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  26. Developing a Competency Framework for Health Research Ethics Education and Training.Sean Tackett, Jeremy Sugarman, Chirk Jenn Ng, Adeeba Kamarulzaman & Joseph Ali - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (6):391-396.
    Health research ethics training programmes are being developed and implemented globally, often with a goal of increasing local capacity to assure ethical conduct in health-related research. Yet what it means for there to be sufficient HRE capacity is not well-defined, and there is currently no consensus on outcomes that HRE training programmes should collectively intend to achieve. Without defining the expected outcomes, meaningful evaluation of individual participants and programmes is challenging. In this article, we briefly describe the evolution of formal (...)
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  27. Who Commits the Unnaturalistic Fallacy?Kyle Ferguson - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (6):382-383.
    According to G E Moore,1 we commit the naturalistic fallacy when we infer ‘x is good’ from non-evaluative premises involving x such as ‘ x is pleasant’ or ‘ x is desired’. On Moore’s view, the mistake is to think that we can reduce moral goodness to anything else or explain it in any other terms. We cannot analyse ‘good’, Moore thought, because goodness is simple, non-natural and sui generis. If Moore were alive today, and if he were to ask (...)
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  28. Vaccine Mandates Need a Clear Rationale to Identify Which Exemptions Are Appropriate.Bridget Williams - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (6):384-385.
    The rapid development and roll-out of COVID-19 vaccines has been a surprising success of the pandemic and has likely saved hundreds of thousands of lives. Although most people were eager to receive a vaccine, many jurisdictions introduced mandates to ensure rapid uptake in the population, especially among key workers including healthcare workers. In some instances, individuals who can prove they have recovered from COVID-19 have been exempt from vaccine mandates, but in other cases such exemptions have not been made. Pugh (...)
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  29. No Right Answer: Officials Need Discretion on Whether to Allow Natural Immunity Exemptions.Dorit Reiss - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (6):380-381.
    In their thoughtful, nuanced and interesting discussion, Jonathan Pugh, Julian Savulescu, Rebecca Brown and Dom Wilkinson argued that officials should recognise proof of prior infection as a valid exemption from vaccination requirements.1 This commentary agrees with parts of their analysis, but argues that the case for the exemption is less clear than the authors suggest, and the better approach is to allow officials flexibility: an exemption for natural immunity may be appropriate or may not. In part, the disagreements may stem (...)
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  30. Trial by Triad: Substituted Judgment, Mental Illness and the Right to Die.Jacob M. Appel - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (6):358-361.
    Substituted judgment has increasingly become the accepted standard for rendering decisions for incapacitated adults in the USA. A broad exception exists with regard to patients with diminished capacity secondary to depressive disorders, as such patients’ previous wishes are generally not honoured when seeking to turn down life-preserving care or pursue aid-in-dying. The result is that physicians often force involuntary treatment on patients with poor medical prognoses and/or low quality of life as a result of their depressive symptoms when similarly situated (...)
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  31. What Money Can’T Buy: An Argument Against Paying People to Get Vaccinated.Nancy S. Jecker - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (6):362-366.
    This paper considers the proposal to pay people to get vaccinated against the SARS-CoV-2 virus. The first section introduces arguments against the proposal, including less intrusive alternatives, unequal effects on populations and economic conditions that render payment more difficult to refuse. The second section considers arguments favouring payment, including arguments appealing to health equity, consistency, being worth the cost, respect for autonomy, good citizenship, the ends justifying the means and the threat of mutant strains. The third section spotlights long-term and (...)
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  32. Is the International Regulation of Medical Complicity with Torture Largely Window Dressing? The Case of Israel and the Lessons of a 12-Year Medical Ethical Appeal.Derek Summerfield - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (6):367-370.
    This is the account of an ongoing appeal initiated in 2009 by 725 doctors from 43 countries concerning medical complicity with torture in Israel. It has been underpinned by a voluminous and still accumulating evidence base from reputable international and regional human rights organisations, quoted below, and has spanned the terms of office of four World Medical Association presidencies and two UN special rapporteurs on torture. This campaign has been a litmus test of whether international medical codes regarding doctors and (...)
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  33. Legitimising Values.John McMillan - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (6):357-357.
    While apparently helpful concepts such as ”best interests“ appear to have the virtue of simplicity, they are really place holders for the communication, time and listening that’s required to understand what truly matters to patients and others involved in healthcare. When we know what matters to a patient, we can have confidence that we have a “legitimate” view of what’s important to them. Two papers in this issue of the Journal of Medical Ethics explore different ways in which values can (...)
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  34. Medicine and Shariah: A Dialogue in Islamic BioethicsAasim I.Padela.Notre Dame:University of Notre Dame Press,2021.312 Pp. ISBN‐13: ‎978‐0268108373; ISBN‐10: ‎0268108374. [REVIEW]Kiarash Aramesh - forthcoming - Developing World Bioethics.
  35. What the ‘Greater Good’ Excludes: Patients Left Behind by Pre‐Operative COVID‐19 Screening in an Ethiopian Town.Georgina D. Campelia, Hilkiah K. Suga, John H. Kempen, James N. Kirkpatrick & Nancy S. Jecker - forthcoming - Developing World Bioethics.
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  36. Cultivating Character for Care.Ann Gallagher - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (3):525-526.
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  37. Redefining Nursing Solidarity.Marta Domingo-Osle & Rafael Domingo - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (3):651-659.
    The idea of solidarity is in vogue, especially since the eruption of the COVID-19 pandemic. However, the term “solidarity,” as used in nursing, is imprecise and vague, lacking clear definition and connoting a variety of general meanings. Based on the original meaning of “solidarity” in ancient Roman law, this article captures the archetypical idea of solidarity from a historical and interdisciplinary perspective. This archetypical or primary meaning comes before the development of any other meanings of the word, and it is (...)
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  38. Dignity of Nursing Students in Clinical Learning Environments.Banafsheh Tehranineshat & Camellia Torabizadeh - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (3):742-757.
    As an important professional value, dignity has always been an ethical concern in nursing education and practice. However, the dignity of nursing students in clinical environments has remained a little-discussed topic. This study aims to explore and describe nursing students’ dignity in clinical learning environments. This study is a qualitative descriptive work in which data were collected via semi-structured, in-depth, individual interviews and subsequently analyzed according to conventional content analysis. Based on the inclusion criteria of the study, nursing students were (...)
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  39. Nurses’ Perception of Workplace Discrimination.Fatemeh ZareKhafri, Camellia Torabizadeh & Azita Jaberi - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (3):675-684.
    Background: Discrimination and injustice are big obstacles in nurses’ way to socialization and are among the major clinical challenges faced by nurses. Workplace discrimination is associated with such negative consequences as stress, fatigue, demoralization, loss of professional commitment, tension and conflicts at work, and resignation. A review of literature shows that not much research has been dedicated to workplace discrimination in nursing. Objective: This study aims to investigate nurses’ perception of workplace discrimination. Method: This cross-sectional study was conducted in the (...)
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  40. Ethical Reflection Support for Potential Organ Donors' Relatives: A Narrative Review.Antoine Baumann, Nathalie Thilly, Liliane Joseph & Frédérique Claudot - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (3):660-674.
    Background: Even in countries with an opt-out or presumed consent system, relatives have a considerable influence on the post-mortem organ harvesting decision. However, their reflection capacity may be compromised by grief, and they are, therefore, often prone to choose refusal as default option. Quite often, it results in late remorse and dissatisfaction. So, a high-quality reflection support seems critical to enable them to gain a stable position and a long-term peace of mind, and also avoid undue loss of potential grafts. (...)
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  41. Acknowledging Caregivers’ Vulnerability in the Managment of Challenging Behaviours to Reduce Control Measures in Psychiatry.Jean Lefèvre-Utile, Marjorie Montreuil, Amélie Perron, Aymeric Reyre & Franco Carnevale - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (3):758-779.
    Background: The management of challenging behaviours in inpatient with intellectual disability and/or autism spectrum disorders can lead to an escalation of control measures. In these complex situations where patients have an intellectual disability/autism spectrum disorder accompanied by a psychiatric comorbidity, the experiences of caregivers related to the crisis management have rarely been studied. Purpose: This study examined the moral experiences of caregivers related to challenging behaviours’ management and alternatives to control measures. Research design: Using Charles Taylor’s hermeneutic framework, a 2-month (...)
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  42. Moral Distress Interventions: An Integrative Literature Review.Vanessa K. Amos & Elizabeth Epstein - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (3):582-607.
    Moral distress has been well reviewed in the literature with established deleterious side effects for all healthcare professionals, including nurses, physicians, and others. Yet, little is known about the quality and effectiveness of interventions directed to address moral distress. The aim of this integrative review is to analyze published intervention studies to determine their efficacy and applicability across hospital settings. Of the initial 1373 articles discovered in October 2020, 18 were appraised as relevant, with 1 study added by hand search (...)
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  43. The Influential Factors in Humanistic Critical Care Nursing.Somaye Mohamadi Asl, Mojgan Khademi & Eesa Mohammadi - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (3):608-620.
    Background: One of the main concerns in critical care units is the development of humanistic approaches. In this regard, recognizing the factors affecting humanistic nursing can contribute to humanizing nursing care in these units. Objective: The objective was to recognize the influential factors of humanistic nursing in critical care units. Research design: This qualitative study was carried out using a phenomenology method. Thirty-nine in-depth unstructured interviews were performed. The data were analyzed using the phenomenological nursology approach. To guarantee trustworthiness, prolonged (...)
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  44. Nurses’ Involvement in End-of-Life Decisions in Neonatal Intensive Care Units.Ilias Chatziioannidis, Abraham Pouliakis, Marina Cuttini, Theodora Boutsikou, Evangelia Giougi, Voula Volaki, Rozeta Sokou, Theodoros Xanthos, Zoi Iliodromiti & Nicoletta Iacovidou - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (3):569-581.
    Background: End-of-life decision-making for terminally ill neonates raises important legal and ethical issues. In Greece, no recent data on nurses’ attitudes and involvement in end-of-life decisions are available. Research question/aim: To investigate neonatal nurses’ attitudes and involvement in end-of-life decisions and the relation to their socio-demographic and work-related background data. Research design: A survey was carried out in 28 neonatal intensive care units between September 2018 and January 2019. A structured questionnaire was distributed by post. Participants and research context: The (...)
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  45. Nurses' Awareness and Adherence with National Ethical Guidelines for Research in North India.Suresh K. Sharma - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (3):733-741.
    Background: A large number of nurse researchers do not adhere to ethical standards while performing the research. Moreover, there is far less data on knowledge of existing national ethical guidelines. This study was, therefore, done to assess awareness and adherence to current national ethical guidelines among nursing students and faculty members. Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study was done among nursing faculty members and theses carried out by postgraduate nursing students between 2012 and 2017. Using the convenience sampling technique, seven states (...)
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  46. ‘Blurred Boundaries’: When Nurses and Midwives Give Anti-Vaccination Advice on Facebook.Janet Green, Julia Petty, Lisa Whiting, Fiona Orr, Larissa Smart, Ann-Marie Brown & Linda Jones - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (3):552-568.
    Background: Nurses and midwives have a professional obligation to promote health and prevent disease, and therefore they have an essential role to play in vaccination. Despite this, some nurses and midwives have been found to take an anti-vaccination stance and promulgate misinformation about vaccines, often using Facebook as a platform to do so. Research question: This article reports on one component and dataset from a larger study – ‘the positives, perils and pitfalls of Facebook for nurses’. It explores the specific (...)
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  47. The Duty to Care and Nurses’ Well-Being During a Pandemic.C. Amparo Muñoz-Rubilar, Carolina Pezoa Carrillos, Ingunn Pernille Mundal, Carlos De las Cuevas & Mariela Loreto Lara-Cabrera - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (3):527-539.
    Background: The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic is impacting the delivery of healthcare worldwide, creating dilemmas related to the duty to care. Although understanding the ethical dilemmas about the duty to care among nurses is necessary to allow effective preparation, few studies have explored these concerns. Aim: This study aimed to identify the ethical dilemmas among clinical nurses in Spain and Chile. It primarily aimed to identify nurses’ agreement with the duty to care despite high risks for themselves and/or their families, (...)
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  48. Care-Deficits and Polarization: Why the Time is Ripe for a Universal Care Conscription.Bouke de Vries - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (3):709-718.
    A large share of countries is struggling to provide adequate care to their older populations. To deal with this challenge, philosopher Ingrid Robeyns has advocated legislation that requires citizens to spend 1 year of their life providing dependency care. My aim of this contribution is to strengthen the case for this proposal, which I will refer to as a ‘universal care conscription’. I do so by defending this type of conscription against various alternative ways of addressing care-deficits that have been (...)
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  49. Experiences of Critical Care Nurses During the Early Months of the COVID-19 Pandemic.Dorothy James Moore, Denise Dawkins, Michelle DeCoux Hampton & Susan McNiesh - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (3):540-551.
    Background: Critical care nurses have risked their lives and in some cases their families through hazardous duty during the COVID-19 pandemic and have faced multiple ethical challenges. Research/aim: The purpose of our study was to examine how critical care nurses coped with the sustained multi-faceted pressures of the critical care environment during the unchartered waters of the COVID-19 pandemic. It was anticipated that our study might reveal numerous ethical challenges and decision points. Research design: A qualitative descriptive study, utilizing an (...)
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  50. Advance Care Planning in Dementia Care: Wants, Beliefs, and Insight.Annika Tetrault, Maj-Helen Nyback, Heli Vaartio-Rajalin & Lisbeth Fagerström - 2022 - Nursing Ethics 29 (3):696-708.
    Background: Advance care planning gives patients and their family members the possibility to consider and make decisions regarding future care and medical procedures. Aim: To explore the view of people in the early stage of dementia on planning for future care. Research design: The study is a qualitative interview study with a semistructured interview guide. The data were analyzed according to the Qualitative Analysis Guide of Leuven. Participants and research context: Dementia nurses assisted in the recruiting of people with dementia (...)
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