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  1. added 2020-06-03
    Innovative Practice, Clinical Research, and the Ethical Advancement of Medicine.Jake Earl - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (6):7-18.
    Innovative practice occurs when a clinician provides something new, untested, or nonstandard to a patient in the course of clinical care, rather than as part of a research study. Commentators have noted that patients engaged in innovative practice are at significant risk of suffering harm, exploitation, or autonomy violations. By creating a pathway for harmful or nonbeneficial interventions to spread within medical practice without being subjected to rigorous scientific evaluation, innovative practice poses similar risks to the wider community of patients (...)
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  2. added 2020-05-21
    Continuous Glucose Monitoring as a Matter of Justice.Steven R. Kraaijeveld - forthcoming - HEC Forum:1-26.
    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic illness that requires intensive lifelong management of blood glucose concentrations by means of external insulin administration. There have been substantial developments in the ways of measuring glucose levels, which is crucial to T1D self-management. Recently, continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) has allowed people with T1D to keep track of their blood glucose levels in near real-time. These devices have alarms that warn users about potentially dangerous blood glucose trends, which can often be shared with (...)
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  3. added 2020-04-27
    How Should Physicians Manage Neuroprognosis with ECPR?Ian McCurry, Jason Han & Andrew Courtwright - forthcoming - Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics.
    Rapidly advancing technologies in the field of extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (ECPR) have presented a new challenge in accurate neuroprognostication following cardiac arrest. Determination of brain state informs the prognostic picture and allows providers to begin effective communication regarding likelihood of meaningful neurological recovery as defined by patients or family members. The evolving role of sedation during ECPR and its impacts on ethical tension in decision-making is reviewed. Work surrounding the advancing field of neuroprognostication after cardiac arrest and hypothermia is summarized (...)
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  4. added 2020-04-27
    Can Children Be Enrolled in a Placebo-Controlled Randomized Clinical Trial of Synthetic Growth Hormone?Ernest D. Prentice, L. Antonson, Andrew Jameton, Benjamin Graber & Thomas Sears - forthcoming - IRB: Ethics & Human Research.
  5. added 2020-04-22
    Personhood and Human Dignity.David Kirchhoffer - 2015 - In Jãnis T. Ozoliņš & Joanne Grainger (eds.), Foundations of Healthcare Ethics: Theory to Practice. Cambridge:
    The concepts of personhood and human dignity are widely used in contemporary healthcare ethics. This chapter provides a brief overview of how the concept of human dignity came to be so important in healthcare ethics, and examines how the concept’s widespread use and relationship to the concept of personhood have led to problems regarding its meaning and relevance. A practical solution is then presented. The rise of the concept of human dignity in healthcare ethics The word dignity is derived from (...)
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  6. added 2020-04-22
    New Medical Technologies and the Ethical Challenges for Minors From the Perspective of Human Dignity.David Kirchhoffer & Kris Dierickx - 2011 - In Jan C. Joerden, Eric Hilgendorf, Natalia Petrillo & Felix Thiele (eds.), Menschenwürde und moderne Medizintechnik. Baden Baden:
    Summary This volume undertakes to determine the fundamentals and limits of an ethical assessment of the methods of modern medical technology with regard to the concepts of human dignity and human image, which are particularly important for this purpose. It shows that the philosophical-legal foundation of the term human dignity has not yet been clearly clarified; one even has to ask whether the term is (still) suitable for assessing ethical problems in medical technology. The term human image also needs clarification (...)
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  7. added 2020-04-16
    Introduction: The Limits of Respect for Autonomy.David G. Kirchhoffer - 2019 - In D. Kirchhoffer & B. Richards (eds.), Beyond Autonomy: Limits and Alternatives to Informed Consent in Research Ethics and Law. Cambridge:
    This book makes an important contribution to ongoing efforts in the fields of medical law and bioethics to answer the challenges posed by the limitations of the principle of respect for autonomy, especially as these pertain to human research ethics. The principle of respect for autonomy seems to have become firmly embedded in human research ethics since its inclusion in the 1947 Nuremberg Code, which was a response to atrocities committed by Nazi doctors. Nonetheless, there is an increasing awareness of (...)
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  8. added 2020-04-16
    Beneficence in Research Ethics.David G. Kirchhoffer, C. Favor & C. Cordner - 2019 - In D. Kirchhoffer & B. Richards (eds.), Beyond Autonomy: Limits and Alternatives to Informed Consent in Research Ethics and Law. Cambridge:
    This chapter examines the explicit and implicit roles that the concept of beneficence plays in the guidelines that govern biomedical research involving humans. We suggest that the role beneficence is actually playing in the guidelines is more comprehensive than is commonly assumed. The broader conceptualisation of beneficence proposed here clarifies the relationship of beneficence to respect for autonomy. It does this by showing how respect for autonomy is at the service of beneficence rather than in tension with it.
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  9. added 2020-04-01
    Conscientious Objection in Medicine: Making it Public.Nir Ben-Moshe - forthcoming - HEC Forum:1-21.
    The literature on conscientious objection in medicine presents two key problems that remain unresolved: Which conscientious objections in medicine are justified, if it is not feasible for individual medical practitioners to conclusively demonstrate the genuineness or reasonableness of their objections? How does one respect both medical practitioners’ claims of conscience and patients’ interests, without leaving practitioners complicit in perceived or actual wrongdoing? My aim in this paper is to offer a new framework for conscientious objections in medicine, which, by bringing (...)
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  10. added 2020-04-01
    Can Reproductive Genetic Manipulation Save Lives?G. Owen Schaefer - 2020 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy.
    It has recently been argued that reproductive genetic manipulation technologies like mitochondrial replacement and germline CRISPR modifications cannot be said to save anyone’s life because, counterfactually, no one would suffer more or die sooner absent the intervention. The present article argues that, on the contrary, reproductive genetic manipulations may be life-saving (and, from this, have therapeutic value) under an appropriate population health perspective. As such, popular reports of reproductive genetic manipulations potentially saving lives or preventing disease are not necessarily mistaken, (...)
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  11. added 2020-04-01
    The Truth Behind Conscientious Objection in Medicine.Nir Ben-Moshe - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (6):404-410.
    Answers to the questions of what justifies conscientious objection in medicine in general and which specific objections should be respected have proven to be elusive. In this paper, I develop a new framework for conscientious objection in medicine that is based on the idea that conscience can express true moral claims. I draw on one of the historical roots, found in Adam Smith’s impartial spectator account, of the idea that an agent’s conscience can determine the correct moral norms, even if (...)
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  12. added 2020-04-01
    The Internal Morality of Medicine: A Constructivist Approach.Nir Ben-Moshe - 2019 - Synthese 196 (11):4449-4467.
    Physicians frequently ask whether they should give patients what they want, usually when there are considerations pointing against doing so, such as medicine’s values and physicians’ obligations. It has been argued that the source of medicine’s values and physicians’ obligations lies in what has been dubbed “the internal morality of medicine”: medicine is a practice with an end and norms that are definitive of this practice and that determine what physicians ought to do qua physicians. In this paper, I defend (...)
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  13. added 2020-03-26
    The Dignity of Human Life: Sketching Out an 'Equal Worth' Approach.Helen Watt - 2020 - Ethics and Medicine 36 (1):7-17.
    The term “value of life” can refer to life’s intrinsic dignity: something nonincremental and time-unaffected in contrast to the fluctuating, incremental “value” of our lives, as they are longer or shorter and more or less flourishing. Human beings are equal in their basic moral importance: the moral indignities we condemn in the treatment of e.g. those with dementia reflect the ongoing human dignity that is being violated. Indignities licensed by the person in advance remain indignities, as when people might volunteer (...)
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  14. added 2020-03-24
    Quantifying Health Across Populations.Stephen Kershnar - 2016 - Bioethics 30 (6):451-461.
    In this article, I argue that as a theoretical matter, a population's health-level is best quantified via averagism. Averagism asserts that the health of a population is the average of members’ health-levels. This model is better because it does not fall prey to a number of objections, including the repugnant conclusion, and because it is not arbitrary. I also argue that as a practical matter, population health-levels are best quantified via totalism. Totalism asserts that the health of a population is (...)
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  15. added 2020-03-20
    Vaccinating for Whom? Distinguishing Between Self-Protective, Paternalistic, Altruistic and Indirect Vaccination.Steven R. Kraaijeveld - forthcoming - Public Health Ethics:phaa005.
    Preventive vaccination can protect not just vaccinated individuals, but also others, which is often a central point in discussions about vaccination. To date, there has been no systematic study of self- and other-directed motives behind vaccination. This article has two major goals: first, to examine and distinguish between self- and other-directed motives behind vaccination, especially with regard to vaccinating for the sake of third parties, and second, to explore some ways in which this approach can help to clarify and guide (...)
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  16. added 2020-03-12
    Applying Nonideal Theory to Bioethics: Living and Dying in a Nonideal World.E. Victor & L. Guidry-Grimes (eds.) - forthcoming - Springer.
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  17. added 2020-03-10
    An Ethics Framework for Big Data in Health and Research.Vicki Xafis, G. Owen Schaefer, Markus K. Labude, Iain Brassington, Angela Ballantyne, Hannah Yeefen Lim, Wendy Lipworth, Tamra Lysaght, Cameron Stewart, Shirley Sun, Graeme T. Laurie & E. Shyong Tai - 2019 - Asian Bioethics Review 11 (3):227-254.
    Ethical decision-making frameworks assist in identifying the issues at stake in a particular setting and thinking through, in a methodical manner, the ethical issues that require consideration as well as the values that need to be considered and promoted. Decisions made about the use, sharing, and re-use of big data are complex and laden with values. This paper sets out an Ethics Framework for Big Data in Health and Research developed by a working group convened by the Science, Health and (...)
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  18. added 2020-03-04
    Contemporary Debates in Bioethics: European Perspectives.Emilian Mihailov, Tenzin Wangmo, Victoria Federiuc & Bernice Elger (eds.) - 2019 - De Gruyter Open.
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  19. added 2020-02-12
    One of Us: Conjoined Twins and the Future of Normal.Shelley Tremain - 2009 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 2 (1):181-184.
  20. added 2020-02-03
    Does Mental Discipline Partially Restore the Responsibility of BCI Users?Viktor Ivanković & Lovro Savic - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 11 (1):67-70.
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  21. added 2020-01-14
    From Stories to Discoveries.Krista Hoffman-Longtin & Adam Hayden - 2018 - Narrating Patienthood: Engaging Diverse Voices on Health, Communication, and the Patient Experience:17-34.
    Biomedical researchers are trained to use positivistic approaches to develop efficacious treatments and pursue cures for illness and disease. Accordingly, they may rarely engage persons living with the disease in the development of research questions and protocols (Sacristán et al., 2015). Just as patient narratives can create therapeutic partnerships in delivery of treatment (DasGupta & Charon, 2004), they offer value to the research process to emphasize the person with the disease, rather than the disease, in isolation. In this chapter, we (...)
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  22. added 2019-11-28
    The Dictates of Conscience: Can They Justify Conscientious Refusals in Healthcare Contexts?Mary Carman - 2019 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 28 (2):303-315.
    In a recent article in this journal, Steve Clarke (2017) identifies two different bases for conscience-based refusals in healthcare: (1) all-things-considered moral judgments, and (2) the dictates of conscience. He argues that these two bases have distinct roles in justifying conscientious objection. However, accepting that there are these two bases, I argue that both are not able to justify conscientious objection. In particular, I argue that the second basis of the dictates of conscience cannot justify conscience-based refusal in a healthcare (...)
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  23. added 2019-11-03
    The “Four Principles” at 40: What is Their Role in Introductory Bioethics Classes?Brendan Shea - manuscript
    This is the text of a paper (along with appendixes) delivered at the 2019 annual meeting of the Minnesota Philosophical Society on Oct 26 in Cambridge, MN. -/- Beauchamp and Childress’s “Four Principles” (or “Principlism”) approach to bioethics has become something of a standard not only in bioethics classrooms and journals, but also within medicine itself. In this teaching-focused workshop, I’ll be doing the following: (1) Introducing the basics of the “Four Principles” approach, with a special focus on its relation (...)
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  24. added 2019-10-26
    Professional Objections and Healthcare: More Than a Case of Conscience.Michal Pruski - 2019 - Ethics and Medicine 35 (3):149-160.
    While there is a prolific debate surrounding the issue of conscientious objection of individuals towards performing certain clinical acts, this debate ignores the fact that there are other reasons why clinicians might wish to object providing specific services. This paper briefly discusses the idea that healthcare workers might object to providing specific services because they are against their professional judgement, they want to maintain a specific reputation, or they have pragmatic reasons. Reputation here is not simply understood as being in (...)
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  25. added 2019-10-23
    The Harm of Ableism: Medical Error and Epistemic Injustice.David M. Peña-Guzmán & Joel Michael Reynolds - 2019 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 29 (3):205-242.
    This paper argues that epistemic errors rooted in group- or identity- based biases, especially those pertaining to disability, are undertheorized in the literature on medical error. After sketching dominant taxonomies of medical error, we turn to the field of social epistemology to understand the role that epistemic schemas play in contributing to medical errors that disproportionately affect patients from marginalized social groups. We examine the effects of this unequal distribution through a detailed case study of ableism. There are four primary (...)
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  26. added 2019-10-18
    Artificial Wombs, Birth, and "Birth": A Response to Romanis.Nicholas Colgrove - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2019-105845.
    Recently, I argued that human subjects in artificial wombs (AWs) “share the same moral status as newborns” and so, deserve the same treatment and protections as newborns. This thesis rests on two claims: (A) “Subjects of partial ectogenesis—those that develop in utero for at time before being transferred to AWs—are newborns,” and (B) “Subjects of complete ectogenesis—those who develop in AWs entirely—share the same moral status as newborns.” In response, Elizabeth Chloe Romanis argued that the subject in an AW is (...)
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  27. added 2019-10-08
    Universalism Versus Contextualism in Bioethics.Dimitry Mentuz - 2017 - European Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences 3:75-81.
    The goal of this work is to analyse the paradigmatic concept of universal values important for bioethics such as autonomy, beneficence, justice and developing contextual approaches in resolving the moral questions on bioethics. It also aims to reveal and analyse the importance of universal approaches despite the basic non-liminality of a context and subjectivity. Keywords: autonomy, contextualism, subjectivity, universal values, metaethics, normativity.
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  28. added 2019-09-24
    An Ethical Overview on Cloning in Nigeria.Joseph Nkang Ogar - 2019 - Journal of Social, Humanities and Administrative Sciences 5 (18):658-667.
    This work titled "An Ethical Overview on Cloning in Nigeria" analyzed the debate on cloning for which many scholars believe that cloning is not just ethically and morally acceptable, but beneficial in that they allow otherwise infertile couples to have children and permit the study of genetic diseases and indeed genetic development. This work examined cloning from an ethical/moral perspective and held the view that there is everything inherently wrong with the idea of human cloning. As a scientific discovery, it (...)
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  29. added 2019-09-19
    Introduction.Darian0 Meacham - 2015 - In Darian Meacham (ed.), Medicine and Society, New Perspectives in Continental Philosophy. Springer Verlag.
    It usually falls to an introduction such as this to explain the what and the why of the volume: what is contained in the contributions and why it is important. In this instance the two are more or less the same. What distinguishes “continental” approaches to bioethics and philosophy of medicine is precisely the reason why there is value in highlighting such approaches. Before elaborating on that rather vague contention, I would first like to say something briefly about how this (...)
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  30. added 2019-09-12
    On the Duty to Care During Epidemics.Daniel Messelken - 2018 - In Daniel Messelken & David T. Winkler (eds.), Ethical Challenges for Military Health Care Personnel : Dealing with Epidemics. London, U.K.: Routledge. pp. 144-163.
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  31. added 2019-09-12
    Medical Care During War: A Remainder and Prospect of Peace.Daniel Messelken - 2017 - In Florian Demont-Biaggi (ed.), The Nature of Peace and the Morality of Armed Conflict. London, U.K.: Springer International Publishing. pp. 293-321.
    Ideally, the principles of medical care remain unaltered during armed conflict and can be interpreted as a remnant of peace during war. Healthcare providers also support future peace by not discriminating according to the conflict roles between enemy and friend or fighter and civilian, but by respecting everybody, in a non-conflict logic, as human beings. The antithetical view identifies medical care for wounded soldiers as a contribution to a threat. This chapter rejects such an interpretation, which can be found in (...)
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  32. added 2019-09-09
    Bioethical Pluralism and Complementarity.Frederick Grinnell, Jeffrey P. Bishop & Laurence B. McCullough - 2002 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 45 (3):338-349.
    This essay presents complementarity as a novel feature of bioethical pluralism. First introduced by Neils Bohr in conjunction with quantum physics, complementarity in bioethics occurs when different perspectives account for equally important features of a situation but are mutually exclusive. Unlike conventional approaches to bioethical pluralism, which attempt in one fashion or another to isolate and choose between different perspectives, complementarity accepts all perspectives. As a result, complementarity results in a state of holistic, dynamic tension, rather than one that yields (...)
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  33. added 2019-07-22
    Disruption, Diversity, and Global Biobanking.Edwina Light, Miriam Wiersma, Lisa Dive, Ian Kerridge, Christine Critchley & Wendy Lipworth - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (5):45-47.
    Volume 19, Issue 5, May 2019, Page 45-47.
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  34. added 2019-07-22
    Reconceptualizing Autonomy for Bioethics.Lisa Dive & Ainsley J. Newson - 2018 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 28 (2):171-203.
    The concept of autonomy plays a central role in bioethics,1 but there is no consensus as to how we should understand it beyond a general notion of self-determination. The conception of autonomy deployed in applied ethics2 can have crucial ramifications when it is applied in real-world scenarios, so it is important to be clear. However, this clarity is often lacking when autonomy is discussed in the bioethics literature. In this paper we outline three different conceptions of autonomy, and argue that (...)
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  35. added 2019-07-22
    Globalisation and the Ethics of Transnational Biobank Networks.Lisa Dive, Paul Mason, Edwina Light, Ian Kerridge & Wendy Lipworth - 2017 - Asian Bioethics Review 9 (4):301-310.
    Biobanks are increasingly being linked together into global networks in order to maximise their capacity to identify causes of and treatments for disease. While there is great optimism about the potential of these biobank networks to contribute to personalised and data-driven medicine, there are also ethical concerns about, among other things, risks to personal privacy and exploitation of vulnerable populations. Concepts drawn from theories of globalisation can assist with the characterisation of the ethical implications of biobank networking across borders, which (...)
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  36. added 2019-06-15
    Institute of Medical Ethics Guidelines for Confirmation of Appointment, Promotion and Recognition of UK Bioethics and Medical Ethics Researchers.Lucy Frith, Carwyn Hooper, Silvia Camporesi, Thomas Douglas, Anna Smajdor, Emma Nottingham, Zoe Fritz, Merryn Ekberg & Richard Huxtable - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (5):289-291.
    This document is designed to give guidance on assessing researchers in bioethics/medical ethics. It is intended to assist members of selection, confirmation and promotion committees, who are required to assess those conducting bioethics research when they are not from a similar disciplinary background. It does not attempt to give guidance on the quality of bioethics research, as this is a matter for peer assessment. Rather it aims to give an indication of the type, scope and amount of research that is (...)
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  37. added 2019-06-11
    Vulnerability and Incarceration: Evaluating Protections for Prisoners in Research.Elizabeth Victor - 2019 - New York City: Lexington Books.
    While many books on ethics contain a chapter discussing prisoners’ rights and the ethical dimensions of research involving incarcerated persons, Vulnerability and Incarceration is the first monograph devoted to the subject. Victor interrogates the concept of vulnerability to examine prisoners’ right to medical research from a novel point of view.
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  38. added 2019-06-06
    Research Ethics: A Philosophical Guide to the Responsible Conduct of Research.Comstock Gary - 2013 - Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    Education in the responsible conduct of research typically takes the form of online instructions about rules, regulations, and policies. Research Ethics takes a novel approach and emphasizes the art of philosophical decision-making. Part A introduces egoism and explains that it is in the individual's own interest to avoid misconduct, fabrication of data, plagiarism and bias. Part B explains contractualism and covers issues of authorship, peer review and responsible use of statistics. Part C introduces moral rights as the basis of informed (...)
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  39. added 2019-06-06
    On the Cutting Edge: Ethical Responsiveness to Cesarean Rates.Sylvia Burrow - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics 12 (7):44-52.
    Cesarean delivery rates have been steadily increasing worldwide. In response, many countries have introduced target goals to reduce rates. But a focus on target goals fails to address practices embedded in standards of care that encourage, rather than discourage, cesarean sections. Obstetrical standards of care normalize use of technology, creating an imperative to use technology during labor and birth. A technological imperative is implicated in rising cesarean rates if physicians or patients fear refusing use of technology. Reproductive autonomy is at (...)
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  40. added 2019-06-06
    Senior Citizens and the Ethics of E-Inclusion.Emilio Mordini, David Wright, Kush Wadhwa, Paul Hert, Eugenio Mantovani & Jesper Thestrup - 2009 - Ethics and Information Technology 11 (3):203-220.
    The ageing society poses significant challenges to Europe’s economy and society. In coming to grips with these issues, we must be aware of their ethical dimensions. Values are the heart of the European Union, as Article 1a of the Lisbon Treaty makes clear: “The Union is founded on the values of respect for human dignity…”. The notion of Europe as a community of values has various important implications, including the development of inclusion policies. A special case of exclusion concerns the (...)
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  41. added 2019-06-05
    Sex in Medicine: What Stands in the Way of Credibility?Mari Mikkola - 2017 - Topoi 36 (3):479-488.
    Childfree females encounter greater obstacles in obtaining voluntary sterilizations than childfree males. This paper discusses what might explain this and it proposes that female patients encounter particular credibility deficits that undermine their ability to grant informed consent. In particular, the paper explores Miranda Fricker’s recent suggestion that members of structurally disadvantaged groups encounter a particular sort of injustice that harms them in their capacity as knowers: they sustain testimonial injustice. The task of the paper is to investigate whether and in (...)
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  42. added 2019-06-05
    The Diversity of Experimental Organisms in Biomedical Research May Be Influenced by Biomedical Funding.B. R. Erick Peirson, Heather Kropp, Julia Damerow & Manfred D. Laubichler - 2017 - Bioessays 39 (5):1600258.
    Contrary to concerns of some critics, we present evidence that biomedical research is not dominated by a small handful of model organisms. An exhaustive analysis of research literature suggests that the diversity of experimental organisms in biomedical research has increased substantially since 1975. There has been a longstanding worry that organism‐centric funding policies can lead to biases in experimental organism choice, and thus negatively impact the direction of research and the interpretation of results. Critics have argued that a focus on (...)
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  43. added 2019-06-05
    Is It Bad to Be Disabled?Vuko Andric & Joachim Wundisch - 2015 - Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 9 (3):1-17.
    This paper examines the impact of disability on wellbeing and presents arguments against the mere-difference view of disability. According to the mere-difference view, disability does not by itself make disabled people worse off on balance. Rather, if disability has a negative impact on wellbeing overall, this is only so because society is not treating disabled people the way it ought to treat them. In objection to the mere-difference view, it has been argued, roughly, that the view licenses the permissibility of (...)
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  44. added 2019-05-30
    Retter-Kinder, Instrumentalisierung Und Kants ZweckformelSaviour Siblings, Instrumentalization, and Kant’s Formula of Humanity.Tim Henning - 2014 - Ethik in der Medizin 26 (3):195-209.
    Definition of the problem The creation and selection of children as tissue donors is ethically controversial. Critics often appeal to Kant’s Formula of Humanity, i.e. the requirement that people be treated not merely as means but as ends in themselves. As many defenders of the procedure point out, these appeals usually do not explain the sense of the requirement and hence remain obscure. Arguments This article proposes an interpretation of Kant’s principle, and it proposes that two different instrumental stances be (...)
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  45. added 2019-05-24
    Empowerment or Engagement? Digital Health Technologies for Mental Healthcare.Christopher Burr & Jessica Morley - 2020 - In Christopher Burr & Silvia Milano (eds.), The 2019 Yearbook of the Digital Ethics Lab. pp. 67-88.
    We argue that while digital health technologies (e.g. artificial intelligence, smartphones, and virtual reality) present significant opportunities for improving the delivery of healthcare, key concepts that are used to evaluate and understand their impact can obscure significant ethical issues related to patient engagement and experience. Specifically, we focus on the concept of empowerment and ask whether it is adequate for addressing some significant ethical concerns that relate to digital health technologies for mental healthcare. We frame these concerns using five key (...)
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  46. added 2019-05-15
    A Hobbesian Qualm with Space Settlement.Koji Tachibana - 2019 - Futures 110:28-30.
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  47. added 2019-05-06
    Controversies in Latin American Bioethics.Eduardo Rivera-López & Martin Hevia (eds.) - 2019 - Cham: Springer Verlag.
  48. added 2019-03-18
    Risk Impositions, Genuine Losses, and Reparability as a Moral Constraint.Madeleine Hayenhjelm - 2018 - Ethical Perspectives 25 (3):419-446.
    What kind of moral principle could be sufficiently restrictive to avoid the kind of large-scale risks that have resulted in catastrophe in the past, while at the same time not be so restrictive as to halt desirable progress? Is there such a principle that is not merely a precautionary principle, but one that could be based on firm moral grounds? In this article, I set out to explore a simple idea: might it be the case that reparability could serve as (...)
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  49. added 2019-03-18
    The Foundations of Bioethics: Second Edition.H. Tristram Engelhardt - 1996
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  50. added 2019-03-07
    Reply to Pullman.Kevin S. Decker - 2013 - In Arthur L. Caplan & Robert Arp (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Bioethics. Wiley. pp. 25--39.
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