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  1. No Country for Older People? Age and the Digital Divide.Ruth Abbey & Sarah Hyde - 2009 - Journal of Information, Communication and Ethics in Society 7 (4):225-242.
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  2. Organs for Auction.Virginia Abernethy - 1984 - Hastings Center Report 14 (6):49-49.
  3. Social Work and the Safety Net.Marcia Abramson - 1982 - Hastings Center Report 12 (4):19-23.
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  4. Fat Stigma and Public Health: A Theoretical Framework and Ethical Analysis.Desiree Abu-Odeh - 2014 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 24 (3):247-265.
    This paper proposes a theoretical framework for understanding fat stigma and its impact on people’s well-being. It argues that stigma should never be used as a tool to achieve public health ends. Drawing on Bruce Link and Jo Phelan’s 2001 conceptualization of stigma as well as the works of Hilde Lindemann, Paul Benson, and Margaret Urban Walker on identity, positionality, and agency, this paper clarifies the mechanisms by which stigmatizing, oppressive conceptions of overweight and obesity damage identities and diminish moral (...)
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  5. Humanity's End: Why We Should Reject Radical Enhancement.Nicholas Agar - 2013 - Bradford.
    Proposals to make us smarter than the greatest geniuses or to add thousands of years to our life spans seem fit only for the spam folder or trash can. And yet this is what contemporary advocates of radical enhancement offer in all seriousness. They present a variety of technologies and therapies that will expand our capacities far beyond what is currently possible for human beings. In _Humanity's End,_ Nicholas Agar argues against radical enhancement, describing its destructive consequences. Agar examines the (...)
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  6. Truly Human Enhancement: A Philosophical Defense of Limits.Nicholas Agar - 2013 - MIT Press.
    Nicholas Agar offers a more nuanced view of the transformative potential of genetic and cybernetic technologies, making a case for moderate human enhancement—improvements to attributes and abilities that do not significantly exceed what ...
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  7. There Is a Legitimate Place for Human Genetic Enhancement.Nicholas Agar - 2013 - In Arthur L. Caplan & Robert Arp (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Bioethics. Wiley. pp. 25--343.
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  8. Humanity's End: Why We Should Reject Radical Enhancement.Nicholas Agar - 2010 - Bradford.
    Proposals to make us smarter than the greatest geniuses or to add thousands of years to our life spans seem fit only for the spam folder or trash can. And yet this is what contemporary advocates of radical enhancement offer in all seriousness. They present a variety of technologies and therapies that will expand our capacities far beyond what is currently possible for human beings. In _Humanity's End,_ Nicholas Agar argues against radical enhancement, describing its destructive consequences. Agar examines the (...)
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  9. Thoughts About Our Species’ Future: Themes From Humanity’s End: Why We Should Reject Radical Enhancement.Nicholas Agar - 2010 - Journal of Evolution and Technology 21 (2):23-31.
    This paper summarizes a couple of the main arguments from my new book, Humanity’s End. In the book I argue against radical enhancement – the adjustment of human attributes and abilities to levels that greatly exceed what is currently possible for human beings. I’m curious to see what reaction this elicits in a journal whose readership includes some of radical enhancement’s most imaginative and committed advocates.
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  10. Questioning Engelhardt’s Assumptions in Bioethics and Secular Humanism.Shahram Ahmadi Nasab Emran - 2016 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 19 (2):169-176.
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  11. Islamic Bioethics at the End of Life: Why Mukallaf Status Cannot Be the Criterion of Defining the Life That Should Be Saved.Shahram Ahmadi Nasab Emran - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (1):27-28.
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  12. Can Science Fiction Be Useful to Reflect Upon Human Enhancement Issues?Sylvie Allouche - unknown
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  13. Exempting All Minimal-Risk Research From IRB Review: Pruning or Poisoning the Regulatory Tree?Mahesh Ananth & Mike Scheessele - 2012 - IRB: Ethics & Human Research 34 (2):9-14.
    In a recent commentary, Kim and colleagues argued that minimal-risk research should be deregulated so that such studies do not require review by an institutional review board. They claim that regulation of minimal-risk studies provides no adequate counterbalancing good and instead leads to a costly human subjects oversight system. We argue that the counterbalancing good of regulating minimal-risk studies is that oversight exists to ensure that respect for persons and justice requirements are satisfied when they otherwise might not be.
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  14. Is Obesity a Public Health Problem?Jonny Anomaly - 2012 - Public Health Ethics 5 (3):216-221.
    It is often claimed that there is an obesity epidemic in affluent countries, and that obesity is one of the most serious public health threats in the developed world. I will argue that obesity is not an 'epidemic' in any useful sense of the word, and that classifying it as a public health problem requires us to make fairly controversial moral and empirical assumptions. While evidence suggests that the prevalence of obesity is on the rise, and that obesity can lead (...)
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  15. Biomedical Research Funding: When the Game Gets Tough, Winners Start to Play.Giorgio A. Ascoli - 2007 - Bioessays 29 (9):933-936.
  16. Ethics and World Pictures in Kamm on Enhancement.Richard E. Ashcroft & Karen P. Gui - 2005 - American Journal of Bioethics 5 (3):19 – 20.
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  17. Regulating Biomedical Enhancements in the Military.Richard Edmund Ashcroft - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (2):47 – 49.
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  18. Enhancement Technologies and the Person: An Islamic View.Shahid Athar - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 36 (1):59-64.
    The availability of newer choices in contemporary bioethics, especially enhancement technologies, poses a challenge for Muslim patients and their care providers in making appropriate decisions. How should they reconcile personal autonomy with ethical guidelines of Islamic Shariah ? This article discusses such concerns.
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  19. Human Enhancement: An Interdisciplinary Inquiry.Simone Bateman, Jean Gayon, Sylvie Allouche, Jérôme Goffette & Michela Marzano - unknown
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  20. Design for Values in Agricultural Biotechnology.Henk Belt - unknown
    Agricultural biotechnology dates from the last two decades of the twentieth century. It involves the creation of plants and animals with new useful traits by inserting one or more genes taken from other species. New legal possibilities for patenting transgenic organisms and isolated genes have been provided to promote the development of this new technology. The applications of biotechnology raise a whole range of value issues, like consumer and farmer autonomy, respect for intellectual property, environmental sustainability, food security, social justice, (...)
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  21. AIDS and Sexual Morality.Piers Benn - 1992 - Philosophy Now 4:5-8.
  22. Enhanced Humans Versus "Normal People": Elusive Definitions.M. Bess - 2010 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 35 (6):641-655.
    A key aspect of transhumanist thought involves the modification or augmentation of human physical and mental capabilities—a form of intervention often encapsulated under the term "enhancement." This article provides an overview of the concept of enhancement, focusing on six major areas in which usages of the term become slippery and controversial: normal or species-typical functioning, therapeutics or healing, natural functioning, human nature, authenticity, and the ambiguity between "more" and "better." I argue that we need to be aware of the tendency (...)
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  23. Argumente für und wider das Cognitive Enhancement.Ferenc Biedermann - 2010 - Ethik in der Medizin 22 (4):317-329.
    Das Cognitive Enhancement, die Steigerung der geistigen Leistungsfähigkeit gesunder Menschen durch Psychopharmaka und andere Interventionen, ist in jüngster Zeit verstärkt in den Fokus sowohl der Ethik als auch der breiteren Öffentlichkeit geraten. In kontrafaktischer Abstrahierung vom gegenwärtig noch sehr bescheidenen Stand der Technik wird dabei unter anderem erörtert, was grundsätzlich für und was gegen den Einsatz von markant wirksamem Cognitive Enhancement sprechen würde. Der vorliegende Beitrag gibt einen Überblick über die einschlägige Diskussion. Zunächst wird der recht uneinheitlich verwendete Begriff des (...)
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  24. Synthetic Biology Does Not Need a Synthetic Bioethics: Give Me That Old Time (Libertarian) Ethics.Walter E. Block - 2012 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 15 (1):33 - 36.
    Ethics, Policy & Environment, Volume 15, Issue 1, Page 33-36, March 2012.
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  25. Ethical Issues in Human Enhancement.Nick Bostrom & Rebecca Roache - 2007 - In J. Ryberg, T. Petersen & C. Wolf (eds.), New Waves in Applied Ethics. Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 120--152.
    Human enhancement has emerged in recent years as a blossoming topic in applied ethics. With continuing advances in science and technology, people are beginning to realize that some of the basic parameters of the human condition might be changed in the future. One important way in which the human condition could be changed is through the enhancement of basic human capacities. If this becomes feasible within the lifespan of many people alive today, then it is important now to consider the (...)
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  26. Cultural Fault Lines in Healthcare: Reflections on Cultural Competency.Michael C. Brannigan - 2011 - Lexington Books.
    An invaluable work especially for professionals and students in health care, bioethics, humanities, cultural studies, and for the educated lay reader, this volume offers a critical reflection on cultural competence and awareness in health care, an arena where world views and values often collide.
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  27. Five Principles for the Regulation of Human Enhancement.Roger Brownsword - 2012 - Asian Bioethics Review 4 (4):344-354.
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  28. Still Unconvinced, but Still Tentative: A Reply to DeGrazia.A. Buchanan - 2012 - Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (3):140-141.
    David DeGrazia's article provides a careful and fair rendition of my position on the possibility of post-persons. However, I am unconvinced that he has shown that such beings are possible. My view is based on two assumptions: (1) the concept of moral status is a threshold concept; and (2) the most plausible understanding of moral status as a threshold concept is a Kantian respect-based view, according to which all and only those beings who have the capacity to be accountable for (...)
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  29. Enhancement and Human Nature.A. Buchanan - 2009 - Bioethics 23 (3):141 - 50.
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  30. Better Than Human: The Promise and Perils of Biomedical Enhancement.Allen Buchanan - 2012 - Oxford University Press USA.
    Is it right to use biomedical technologies to make us better than well or even perhaps better than human? Should we view our biology as fixed or should we try to improve on it? College students are already taking cognitive enhancement drugs. The U.S. army is already working to develop drugs and technologies to produce "super soldiers." Scientists already know how to use genetic engineering techniques to enhance the strength and memories of mice and the application of such technologies to (...)
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  31. Biotechnology, Ethics, and the Structure of Agriculture.Jeffrey Burkhardt - 1988 - Agriculture and Human Values 5 (3):53-60.
    The “new” agricultural biotechnologies are presently high-priority items on the national research agenda. The promise of increased efficiency and productivity resulting from products and processes derived from biotech is thought to justify the commitment to R&D. Nevertheless, critics challenge the environmental safety as well as political-economic consequences of particular products of biotech, notably, ice-nucleating bacteria and the bovine growth hormone. In this paper the critics' arguments are analyzed in explicitly ethical terms, and assessed as to their relative merits. In some (...)
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  32. A Brief Critique of Two Claims About the Social Value of Biotechnological Enhancements.Benjamin J. Capps, Gordon Stirrat & Lisbeth Witthøfft Nielson - 2012 - Asian Bioethics Review 4 (4):259-271.
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  33. Context, Existing Frameworks, and Practicality:Moving Forward with Synthetic Biology.Sarah R. Carter - 2014 - Hastings Center Report 44 (S5):S46-S48.
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  34. Should We Enhance Animals?S. Chan - 2009 - Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (11):678-683.
    Much bioethical discussion has been devoted to the subject of human enhancement through various technological means such as genetic modification. Although many of the same technologies could be, indeed in many cases already have been, applied to non-human animals, there has been very little consideration of the concept of “animal enhancement”, at least not in those specific terms. This paper addresses the notion of animal enhancement and the ethical issues surrounding it. A definition of animal enhancement is proposed that provides (...)
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  35. Sustainable Human Well-Being: An Interpretation of Capability Enhancement From a 'Stakeholders and Systems' Perspective.Kanchan Chopra - 2008 - In Kaushik Basu & Ravi Kanbur (eds.), Arguments for a Better World: Essays in Honor of Amartya Sen: Volume I: Ethics, Welfare, and Measurement and Volume Ii: Society, Institutions, and Development. Oxford University Press.
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  36. The Elusive Line Between Enhancement and Therapy and its Effects on Health Care in the US.Laura Colleton - 2008 - Journal of Evolution and Technology 18 (1):70-78.
    Biotechnology now makes it possible to enhance human traits as well as treat illnesses and disorders. What it has neglected to establish, however, is a clear line between these two functions, a distinction between what counts as treatment or therapy and what counts as enhancement. The bulk of the literature on enhancements focuses on the ethics of enhancements, not on the criteria that qualify a procedure as an enhancement . While the ethical questions regarding the desirability of enhancements are certainly (...)
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  37. Genetic Enhancement, Post-Persons, and Moral Status: Author Reply to Commentaries.D. DeGrazia - 2012 - Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (3):145-147.
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  38. Enhancement Technologies and Human Identity.David Degrazia - 2005 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 30 (3):261 – 283.
    As the President's Council on Bioethics emphasized in a recent report, rapid growth of biotechnologies creates increasingly many possibilities for enhancing human traits. This article addresses the claim that enhancement via biotechnology is inherently problematic for reasons pertaining to our identity. After clarifying the concept of enhancement, and providing a framework for understanding human identity, I examine the relationship between enhancement and identity. Then I investigate two identity-related challenges to biotechnological enhancements: (1) the charge of inauthenticity and (2) the charge (...)
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  39. Über moralische Bemühungen um Leben.Andreas Dorschel - 1994 - Zeitschrift Für Didaktik der Philosophie Und Ethik 16 (4).
  40. Synthetic Biology and the Ethics of Knowledge.T. Douglas & J. Savulescu - 2010 - Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (11):687-693.
    Synthetic biologists aim to generate biological organisms according to rational design principles. Their work may have many beneficial applications, but it also raises potentially serious ethical concerns. In this article, we consider what attention the discipline demands from bioethicists. We argue that the most important issue for ethicists to examine is the risk that knowledge from synthetic biology will be misused, for example, in biological terrorism or warfare. To adequately address this concern, bioethics will need to broaden its scope, contemplating (...)
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  41. Enhancement, Biomedical.Thomas Douglas - 2013 - In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  42. Our Vision for the Agricultural Sciences Needs to Include Biotechnology.Donald N. Duvick - 1991 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 4 (2):200-206.
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  43. When is Diminishment a Form of Enhancement? : Rethinking the Enhancement Debate in Biomedical Ethics.Brian D. Earp, Anders Sandberg, Guy Kahane & Julian Savulescu - unknown
    The enhancement debate in neuroscience and biomedical ethics tends to focus on the augmentation of certain capacities or functions: memory, learning, attention, and the like. Typically, the point of contention is whether these augmentative enhancements should be considered permissible for individuals with no particular “medical” disadvantage along any of the dimensions of interest. Less frequently addressed in the literature, however, is the fact that sometimes the _diminishment_ of a capacity or function, under the right set of circumstances, could plausibly contribute (...)
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  44. Adventure! Comedy! Tragedy! Robots! How Bioethicists Learned to Stop Worrying and Embrace Their Inner Cyborgs.Carl Elliott - 2005 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 2 (1):18-23.
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  45. Technology and Morality: Influences on Public Attitudes Toward Biotechnology.Christian Evensen, Thomas Hoban & Eric Woodrum - 2000 - Knowledge, Technology and Policy 13 (1):43-57.
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  46. Justice in the Genetically Transformed Society.Colin Patrick Farrelly - 2005 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 15 (1):91-99.
    : This paper explores some of the challenges raised by human genetic interventions for debates about distributive justice, focusing on the challenges that face prioritarian theories of justice and their relation to the argument advanced by Ronald Lindsay elsewhere in this issue of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal. Also examined are the implications of germ-line genetic enhancements for intergenerational justice, and an argument is given against Fritz Allhoff's conclusion, found in this issue as well, that such enhancements are morally (...)
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  47. In Defence of State Directed Enhancement.Tim Fowler - 2015 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 32 (1):67-81.
    This article considers the ways in which a liberal society ought to view the potential to cognitively or physically enhance children. At present, the dominant approach in the literature is to leave this decision to parents. I suggest that the parental choice approach is often inadequate and fails to account properly for the interests of children and wider society in enhancement decisions. Instead I suggest that the state should play a greater role in determining when, and how, to enhance. To (...)
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  48. Why People Should Be Free to Sell Their Organs.Danny Frederick - manuscript
  49. Raising the Bar in the Justification of Animal Research. Galgut - 2015 - Journal of Animal Ethics 5 (1):5-19,.
    Animal ethics committees (AECs) appeal to utilitarian principles in their justification of animal experiments. Although AECs do not grant rights to animals, they do accept that animals have moral standing and should not be unnecessarily harmed. Although many appeal to utilitarian arguments in the justification of animal experiments, I argue that AECs routinely fall short of the requirements needed for such justification in a variety of ways. I argue that taking the moral status of animals seriously—even if this falls short (...)
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  50. Better Humans? Understanding the Enhancement Project by M. Hauskeller, 2013 Durham, NC, Acumen Publishingix + 212 Pp, £18.99 (Pb). [REVIEW]Mirko D. Garasic - 2014 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 31 (2):215-217.
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