Biomedical Ethics

Edited by L. Syd M Johnson (SUNY Upstate Medical University)
Assistant editor: Tyler John (Rutgers University - New Brunswick)
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History/traditions: Biomedical Ethics

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  1. Vampires 2.0? The Ethical Quandaries of Young Blood Infusion in the Quest for Eternal Life.Andrea Lavazza & Mirko Garasic - forthcoming - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy.
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  2. What Healthcare Professionals Owe Us: Why Their Duty to Treat During a Pandemic is Contingent on Personal Protective Equipment.Udo Schuklenk - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2020-106278.
    Healthcare professionals’ capacity to protect themselves, while caring for infected patients during an infectious disease pandemic, depends on their ability to practise universal precautions. In turn, universal precautions rely on the availability of personal protective equipment. During the SARS-CoV2 outbreak many healthcare workers across the globe have been reluctant to provide patient care because crucial PPE components are in short supply. The lack of such equipment during the pandemic was not a result of careful resource allocation decisions in the global (...)
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  3. The Case Against Solicitation of Consent for Apnea Testing.Dhristie Bhagat & Ariane Lewis - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (6):20-22.
    Volume 20, Issue 6, June 2020, Page 20-22.
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  4. Myopia in Reportability of Ethical Concerns in Healthcare Ethics Consultation.A. Fiester - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (6):73-75.
    Volume 20, Issue 6, June 2020, Page 73-75.
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  5. Engaging Patients and Families in the Ethics of Involuntary Psychiatric Care.Katrina Hui, Rachel B. Cooper & Juveria Zaheer - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (6):82-84.
    Volume 20, Issue 6, June 2020, Page 82-84.
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  6. Requiring Consent for Brain-Death Testing: A Perilous Proposal.Joseph Bertino & Jordan Potter - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (6):28-30.
    Volume 20, Issue 6, June 2020, Page 28-30.
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  7. Can’T Hit Pause? On the Constitutive Elements of Responsible Ventilator Management & the Apnea Test.Kevin M. Dirksen & Lilith Judd - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (6):35-37.
    Volume 20, Issue 6, June 2020, Page 35-37.
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  8. Gaps in Ethics Consultation Support for Patients and Families and Practical Guidance for Future Research or Quality Work Involving These Stakeholders.Hilary Mabel, Sundus Riaz, Marguerite Augustine & Jane Jankowski - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (6):75-77.
    Volume 20, Issue 6, June 2020, Page 75-77.
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  9. Death Determination and Clinicians’ Epistemic Authority.David Rodríguez-Arias, Alberto Molina-Pérez & Gonzalo Díaz-Cobacho - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (6):44-47.
    Volume 20, Issue 6, June 2020, Page 44-47.
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  10. Informed Consent Should Not Be Required for Apnea Testing and Arguing It Should Misses the Point.Armand H. Matheny Antommaria, William Sveen & Erika L. Stalets - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (6):25-27.
    Volume 20, Issue 6, June 2020, Page 25-27.
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  11. Schrödinger’s Cat and the Ethically Untenable Act of Not Looking.Christian J. Vercler & Naomi Tricot Laventhal - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (6):40-42.
    Volume 20, Issue 6, June 2020, Page 40-42.
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  12. How to Support Patient and Family in Dealing with Ethical Issues? The Relevance of Moral Case Deliberation.Guy Widdershoven, Margreet Stolper, Bert Molewijk & Suzanne Metselaar - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (6):70-72.
    Volume 20, Issue 6, June 2020, Page 70-72.
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  13. Legal and Ethical Considerations for Requiring Consent for Apnea Testing in Brain Death Determination.Ivor Berkowitz & Jeremy R. Garrett - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (6):4-16.
    The past decade has witnessed escalating legal and ethical challenges to the diagnosis of death by neurologic criteria. The legal tactic of demanding consent for the apnea test, if successful, can halt the DNC. However, US law is currently unsettled and inconsistent in this matter. Consent has been required in several trial cases in Montana and Kansas but not in Virginia and Nevada. In this paper, we analyze and evaluate the legal and ethical bases for requiring consent before apnea testing (...)
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  14. Taking Family-Centered Care Seriously.Anita Ho - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (6):65-67.
    Volume 20, Issue 6, June 2020, Page 65-67.
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  15. Informed Consent for Apnea Testing: Meeting the Standard of Care.Brian Michael Jackson - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (6):49-51.
    Volume 20, Issue 6, June 2020, Page 49-51.
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  16. Beyond the Apnea Test: An Argument to Broaden the Requirement for Consent to the Entire Brain Death Evaluation.Erin Paquette, Joel Frader, Seema Shah, Robert C. Tasker & Robert Truog - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (6):17-19.
    Volume 20, Issue 6, June 2020, Page 17-19.
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  17. Patient and Family Descriptions of Ethical Concerns.Hae Lin Cho, Christine Grady, Anita Tarzian, Gail Povar, Jed Mangal & Marion Danis - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (6):52-64.
    Ethically challenging situations routinely arise in the course of illness and healthcare. However, very few studies have surveyed patients and family members about their experiences with ethically challenging situations. To address this gap in the literature, we surveyed patients and family members at three hospitals. We conducted a content analysis of their responses to open-ended questions about their most memorable experience with an ethical concern for them or their family member. Participants described 219 unique ethical experiences that spanned many of (...)
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  18. Determining Death and the Scope of Medical Obligations.D. Micah Hester - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (6):37-39.
    Volume 20, Issue 6, June 2020, Page 37-39.
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  19. The Genetic Family as Patient?Bartha Maria Knoppers & Kristina Kekesi-Lafrance - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (6):77-80.
    Volume 20, Issue 6, June 2020, Page 77-80.
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  20. Accommodating Apnea Testing Not Death Determination Refusal.Christos Lazaridis - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (6):47-49.
    Volume 20, Issue 6, June 2020, Page 47-49.
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  21. The Moral Distress of Patients and Families.Connie M. Ulrich - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (6):68-70.
    Volume 20, Issue 6, June 2020, Page 68-70.
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  22. The Apnea Test: Requiring Consent for a Test That is a Self-Fulfilling Prophecy, Not Fit for Purpose, and Always Confounded?Ari R. Joffe - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (6):42-44.
    Volume 20, Issue 6, June 2020, Page 42-44.
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  23. Restoring Trust and Requiring Consent in Death by Neurological Criteria.L. Syd M. Johnson - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (6):33-35.
    Volume 20, Issue 6, June 2020, Page 33-35.
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  24. Shared Decision-Making in the Determination of Death by Neurologic Criteria.Alexander A. Kon - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (6):30-32.
    Volume 20, Issue 6, June 2020, Page 30-32.
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  25. Who Cares About Care? Family Members as Moral Actors in Treatment Decision Making.Anna-Henrikje Seidlein & Sabine Salloch - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (6):80-82.
    Volume 20, Issue 6, June 2020, Page 80-82.
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  26. Apnea Testing is Medical Treatment Requiring Informed Consent.Greg Yanke, Mohamed Y. Rady, Joseph Verheijde & Joan McGregor - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (6):22-24.
    Volume 20, Issue 6, June 2020, Page 22-24.
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  27. Response to Open Peer Commentaries “Rethinking the Ethical, Legal, and Clinical Foundations of Informed Consent and Shared Decision-Making for Brain Death Determination”.Jeremy R. Garrett & Ivor Berkowitz - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (6):W1-W5.
    Volume 20, Issue 6, June 2020, Page W1-W5.
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  28. Brain Death Testing: Time for National Uniformity.Thaddeus Mason Pope - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (6):1-3.
    Volume 20, Issue 6, June 2020, Page 1-3.
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  29. After Abortion’s Arrival in Northern Ireland: Conscientious Objection and Other Concerns.Nathan Emmerich - 2020 - Clinical Ethics 15 (2):71-74.
    Until recently, Northern Ireland was infamous for having one of the most restrictive legal frameworks for abortion in Europe. This meant that few were performed in the country, and those who wished to terminate a pregnancy were forced to travel to other parts of the UK or further afield. In 2019 a continuing political stalemate in Northern Ireland has indirectly resulted in the relevant legislation recently being repealed by the UK government. For a short time, this meant that the legal (...)
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  30. A Randomized, Controlled, Equivalence Study of Authorized Versus Non-Authorized Deception in a Model of Pain Following Third Molar Extraction.Nithya Gogtay, Mukta Sunil Kuyare, Nanda Pai, Lopa Mehta, Pranali Rajapure & Urmila M. Thatte - 2020 - Clinical Ethics 15 (2):104-110.
    Background and rationaleWhen deception is used, a conflict ensues between the need to use it to answer a research question scientifically whilst protecting the participants’ autonomy simultaneously...
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  31. Counting the Cost of Denying Assisted Dying.David Shaw & Alec Morton - 2020 - Clinical Ethics 15 (2):65-70.
    In this paper, we propose and defend three economic arguments for permitting assisted dying. These arguments are not intended to provide a rationale for legalising assisted suicide or euthanasia in...
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  32. We Were in One Place, and the Ethics Committee in Another: Experiences of Going Through the Research Ethics Application Process.Rob Brindley, Lizette Nolte & Pieter W. Nel - 2020 - Clinical Ethics 15 (2):94-103.
    This study aimed to explore postgraduate students’ lived experiences of managing research ethics committee processes. Whilst there is a wide range of research that explores ethics principles/guidan...
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  33. ‘If He Dies with the Papers of His Brother, His Brother Will Be Considered Dead’. Moral Understandings of Health Professionals About the Use of Deception to Overcome Restrictions in Access to Healthcare.Dirk Lafaut - 2020 - Clinical Ethics 15 (2):84-93.
    Although scholars in bioethics usually consider the exclusion of migrants from basic healthcare as unjust, it remains unclear how health professionals should ethically deal with policies restrictin...
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  34. Facilitators, Barriers, and Recommendations Related to the Informed Consent of Marshallese in a Randomized Control Trial.Rachel S. Purvis, Leah R. Eisenberg, Christopher R. Trudeau, Christopher R. Long & Pearl A. McElfish - 2020 - Clinical Ethics 15 (2):75-83.
    BackgroundThe Pacific Islander population is the second fasting growing population in the United States and Arkansas is home to the largest Marshallese population in the continental US. The Marshal...
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  35. Bioethics and the Rule of Law: A Classical Liberal Theory.Michael Brodrick - 2020 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 45 (3):277-296.
    Heated debates over healthcare policy in the United States point to the need for a legal framework that can sustain both moral diversity and peaceful cooperation. It is argued that the classical liberal Rule of Law, with its foundation in the ethical principle of permission, is such a framework. The paper shows to what extent the current healthcare policy landscape in the United States diverges from the rule of law and suggests how the current framework could be modified in order (...)
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  36. Nine Months.Elselijn Kingma - 2020 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 45 (3):371-386.
    When did we begin to exist? Barry Smith and Berit Brogaard argue that a new human organism comes into existence neither earlier nor later than the moment of gastrulation: 16 days after conception. Several critics have responded that the onset of the organism must happen earlier; closer to conception. This article makes a radically different claim: if we accept Smith and Brogaard’s ontological commitments, then human organisms start, on average, roughly nine months after conception. The main point of contention is (...)
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  37. Harm as a Necessary Component of the Concept of Medical Disorder: Reply to Muckler and Taylor.Jerome C. Wakefield & Jordan A. Conrad - 2020 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 45 (3):350-370.
    Wakefield’s harmful dysfunction analysis asserts that the concept of medical disorder includes a naturalistic component of dysfunction and a value component, both of which are required for disorder attributions. Muckler and Taylor, defending a purely naturalist, value-free understanding of disorder, argue that harm is not necessary for disorder. They provide three examples of dysfunctions that, they claim, are considered disorders but are entirely harmless: mild mononucleosis, cowpox that prevents smallpox, and minor perceptual deficits. They also reject the proposal that dysfunctions (...)
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  38. Autonomy, Consent, and the “Nonideal” Case.Hallvard Lillehammer - 2020 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 45 (3):297-311.
    According to one influential view, requirements to elicit consent for medical interventions and other interactions gain their rationale from the respect we owe to each other as autonomous, or self-governing, rational agents. Yet the popular presumption that consent has a central role to play in legitimate intervention extends beyond the domain of cases where autonomous agency is present to cases where far from fully autonomous agents make choices that, as likely as not, are going to be against their own best (...)
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  39. The Irrelevance of Harm for a Theory of Disease.Dane Muckler & James Stacey Taylor - 2020 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 45 (3):332-349.
    Normativism holds that there is a close conceptual link between disease and disvalue. We challenge normativism by advancing an argument against a popular normativist theory, Jerome Wakefield’s harmful dysfunction account. Wakefield maintains that medical disorders are breakdowns in evolved mechanisms that cause significant harm to the organism. We argue that Wakefield’s account is not a promising way to distinguish between disease and health because being harmful is neither necessary nor sufficient for a dysfunction to be a disorder. Counterexamples to the (...)
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  40. Do We Need Rights in Bioethics Discourse?Julius Sim - 2020 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 45 (3):312-331.
    Moral rights feature prominently and are relied on substantially in debates in bioethics. Conceptually, however, duties can perform the logical work of rights, but not vice versa, and reference to rights is therefore inessential. Normatively, rights, like duties, depend on more basic moral values or principles, and attempts to establish the logical priority of rights over duties or the reverse are misguided. In practical decision making, however, an analysis in terms of duties is more fruitful than one based on rights. (...)
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  41. Bioethics in the Ruins.Allen Porter - 2020 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 45 (3):259-276.
    In The Foundations of Bioethics, former senior editor of The Journal of Medicine and Philosophy H. Tristram Engelhardt, Jr. radically reassessed the nature and scope of bioethics, as well as the possibilities for this still-young field that he helped found, in light of the prevailing sociohistorical context, which he argued had been inadequately considered by bioethicists. This issue of The Journal of Medicine and Philosophy provides a snapshot of how bioethics is developing in the wake of Engelhardt’s critique. Topics covered (...)
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  42. Lacan on Trauma and Causality: A Psychoanalytic Critique of Post-Traumatic Stress/Growth.Colin Wright - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Humanities:1-10.
    This article makes the case for the largely unacknowledged relevance of the thought of the French psychoanalyst, Jacques Lacan, for the emerging field of the medical and/or health humanities. From the 1930s all the way through to the late 1970s, Lacan was deeply concerned with the ethical and political consequences of then-dominant conceptions of the human in the ‘psy’ disciplines. His attempt to ‘humanise’ these disciplines involved an emphasis on humans as symbolic beings, inevitably entangled in the structures of speech (...)
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  43. ‘There is a Lot of Good in Knowing, but There is Also a Lot of Downs’: Public Views on Ethical Considerations in Population Genomic Screening.Amelia K. Smit, Gillian Reyes-Marcelino, Louise Keogh, Anne E. Cust & Ainsley J. Newson - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2019-105934.
    Publics are key stakeholders in population genomic screening and their perspectives on ethical considerations are relevant to programme design and policy making. Using semi-structured interviews, we explored social views and attitudes towards possible future provision of personalised genomic risk information to populations to inform prevention and/or early detection of relevant conditions. Participants were members of the public who had received information on their personal genomic risk of melanoma as part of a research project. The focus of the analysis presented here (...)
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  44. The Voices That Accompany Me.Arthur W. Frank - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (2):171-178.
    This essay begins with a metaphor describing who enters the field of humanities in medicine and healthcare and the types of work they do. The role of witness is discussed, underscoring tensions between witnessing and analyzing. The essay then turns to my own background as an example of how each professional in this field brings something distinct. I briefly describe the three basic principles of my work with narrative: the injunction to keep the stories in the foreground, the work of (...)
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  45. Sundown for JC.James M. Wilkins - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (2):263-263.
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  46. Risk, Health, and Physical Enhancement: The Dangers of Health Care as Risk Reduction for Christian Bioethics.Paul Scherz - forthcoming - Christian Bioethics.
    Medicine increasingly envisions health promotion in terms of reducing risk as determined by quantitative risk factors, such as blood pressure, blood lipids, or genetic variants. This essay argues that this vision of health care as risk reduction is dangerous for Christian bioethics, since risk can be infinitely reduced leading to a self-defeating spiral of iatrogenic effects. Moreover, it endangers character because this vision of health is connected to a reductionist vision of the body and an understanding of individual risk that (...)
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  47. Voices from the Newspaper Club: Patient Life at a State Psychiatric Hospital.Emily Beckman, Elizabeth Nelson & Modupe Labode - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Humanities:1-17.
    The authors conducted a qualitative analysis of thirty-seven issues of The DDU Review, a newsletter produced by residents of the Dual Diagnosis Unit, a residential unit for people who had diagnoses of developmental disability and serious mental illness in the Central State Hospital. The analysis of the newsletters produced between September 1988 and June 1992 revealed three major themes: 1) the mundane; 2) good behavior; and 3) advocacy. Contrary to the authors’ expectations, the discourse of medicalization—such as relations with physicians, (...)
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  48. From Girlhood to Motherhood: Rituals of Childbirth and Obstetrical Medicine Re-Examined Through John Milton.Ashleigh Frayne - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (2):179-192.
    This article considers how seventeenth-century writer John Milton engages in modes of thinking that register the obstetric revolution occurring during the period. During a time when physicians were gaining entry to the birthing room, a medical rhetoric of childbirth was developing that cast childbirth in new pathological terms. Milton's A Masque Presented at Ludlow Castle demonstrates how childbirth was influenced by emerging obstetrical language and practice, as well as the ways in which a writer might question such influence. Finally, this (...)
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  49. HIV Stigma, Gay Identity, and Caste ‘Untouchability’: Metaphors of Abjection in My Brother…Nikhil, The Boyfriend, and “Gandu Bagicha”.Shamira A. Meghani - 2020 - Journal of Medical Humanities 41 (2):137-151.
    In this article I read textual metaphors of ‘untouchability’ in ‘post-AIDS’ representation as an erasure of structures that condition HIV stigmatization in India. Throughout, my discussion is contextualised by the political economy of HIV and AIDS, which has been productive of particular modern sexual subjects. In the film My Brother…Nikhil, the stigmatization of Nikhil, a gay Indian man living with HIV, is constituted through visual and verbal caste metaphors, which draw on existing subject positions that are elided as ‘traditional’, residual, (...)
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  50. The Health Benefits of Autobiographical Writing: An Interdisciplinary Perspective.Jussi Valtonen - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Humanities:1-19.
    A large body of experimental evidence in the empirical sciences shows that writing about life experiences can be beneficial for mental and physical health. While empirical data regarding the health benefits of writing interventions have been collected in numerous studies in psychology and biomedicine, this literature has remained almost entirely disconnected from scholarship in the humanities and cognitive neuropsychology. In this paper, I review the literature from psychological and biomedical writing interventions, connect these findings to views from philosophy, cognitive neuropsychology (...)
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