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Biomedical Ethics

Edited by L. Syd M Johnson (Michigan Technological University)
Assistant editor: Tyler John (Rutgers University - New Brunswick)
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Health Care Ethics (2,694 | 1,036)

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  1. $authorfirstName $authorlastName (2007). Notice of Redundant Publication: Can the Difference in Medical Fees for Self and Donor Freeze-Thaw Embryo Transfer Cycle, Be in Fact a Cover-Up for the Sale of Donated Human Embryos? Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 2 (1):15.
    Please note that a commentary recently published in this journal (Heng; Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 2007, 2:3) includes substantial duplication of Letters to the Editor published in Developing World Bioethics (Heng; Developing World Bioethics 2007, 7:49) and Human Fertility (Heng; Human Fertility 2007, 10: 129-130).
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  2. Vilhj?? Lmur ?? Rnason (2011). Nonconfrontational Rationality or Critical Reasoning. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 20 (2):228.
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  3. J. G. M. Aartsen, P. V. Admiraal, Id Debeaufort, Tmg Vanberkestijn, Jbv Waalkes, E. Borsteilers, Wh Cense, Hs Cohen, Hm Dupuis & W. Everaerd (1989). Mercy, Murder, and Morality. Hastings Center Report 19 (6):47-48.
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  4. Emily Abdoler, Baruch da See WendlerBrody & Courtney S. Campbell (2010). By Author. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 20 (4):391-393.
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  5. Julia Abelson, Mark E. Warren & Pierre‐Gerlier Forest (2012). The Future of Public Deliberation on Health Issues. Hastings Center Report 42 (2):27-29.
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  6. Virginia Abernethy (1983). The Consequences of “Terminal Rescue”. Hastings Center Report 13 (1):36-36.
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  7. Tineke A. Abma, Bert Molewijk & Guy A. M. Widdershoven (2009). Good Care in Ongoing Dialogue. Improving the Quality of Care Through Moral Deliberation and Responsive Evaluation. Health Care Analysis 17 (3):217-235.
    Recently, moral deliberation within care institutions is gaining more attention in medical ethics. Ongoing dialogues about ethical issues are considered as a vehicle for quality improvement of health care practices. The rise of ethical conversation methods can be understood against the broader development within medical ethics in which interaction and dialogue are seen as alternatives for both theoretical or individual reflection on ethical questions. In other disciplines, intersubjectivity is also seen as a way to handle practical problems, and methodologies have (...)
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  8. Tineke Abma, Anna Alomes, Gwen Anderson, Mila Aroskar, Kim Atkins, Joy Bickley-Asher, Helen Booth, Janie Butts, Miriam Cameron & Franco Carnevale (2008). Reviewers of Articles Received and Published in 2007–08. Nursing Ethics 15 (6):851.
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  9. Tineke Abma, Anne Arber, Arie van der Arend, Marianne Benedicta Arndt, Robert Arnott, Kim Atkins, Helen Aveyard, Susan Bailey, Joy Bickley-Asher & Pamela Bjorklund (2007). Reviewers of Articles Received and Published in 2006Á/07. Nursing Ethics 14 (6):849.
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  10. Tineke Abma & Guy Widdershoven (2014). Dialogical Ethics and Responsive Evaluation as a Framework for Patient Participation. American Journal of Bioethics 14 (6):27-29.
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  11. Maher Abouda, Agnes Hamzaoui, Ekram Drira, Ridha Djebeniani, Salah Othmani & Ali Ben Kheder (2015). The Effect of an Integrated Syndromic Respiratory Disease Guideline in Primary Health Care Settings. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 21 (5):976-981.
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  12. Jean Marie Abraham, Thomas DeLeire & Anne Beeson Royalty (2009). Access to Health Insurance at Small Establishments: What Can We Learn From Analyzing Other Fringe Benefits? Inquiry 46 (3):253-273.
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  13. María Antonia Acosta Valdés, Jorge Luis Quintana Torres, Maria Elena Macías Llanes & Dalyla Alonso Rodríguez (2006). Retos Tecnológicos Para Un Diagnóstico Actual Por El Laboratorio:: Estrés Oxidativo En Pediatría. Humanidades Médicas 6 (3):0-0.
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  14. David P. Adams & Robert J. Fitrakis (1993). General Practice and Rural Health Reform. Professional Ethics, a Multidisciplinary Journal 2 (3):59-82.
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  15. G. P. Adams & M. Cook (1981). The Houseman and the Dying Patient. Journal of Medical Ethics 7 (3):142-145.
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  16. J. Adams (1992). Response to Huggins and Hayden. Journal of Medical Ethics 18 (1):48-48.
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  17. Lee Adams & Ewan Armstrong (1996). Health Promotion—Penrith Paradoxes. From Analysis to Synthesis II—The Revenge. A Report of the Symposium. Health Care Analysis 4 (2):112-119.
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  18. Peter C. Adamson, Carmen Paradis & Martin L. Smith (2007). All for One, or One for All? Hastings Center Report 37 (4):13-15.
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  19. Gerald W. Adelmann (forthcoming). G-Tp of&, 000 or Me. Hastings Center Report.
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  20. Gerald W. Adelmann (1998). Reworking the Landscape, Chicago Style. Hastings Center Report 28 (6):6-11.
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  21. Gwen Adshead (2011). Tineke A. Abmais Professor of Client Participation in Elderly Care at the Department of Medical Humanities and the EMGO+ Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam. She has Published Extensively in the Fields of Program Evaluation and Qualitative Methods, Patient Participation, and (Nursing) Ethics. Elderly Care, Chronic, Care and Psychiatry Are Her Main Practice Fields. [REVIEW] International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 4 (1).
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  22. K. Agar-Newman (1994). Comments on the ICN Position Statements Regarding Human Rights: Without Fear. Nursing Ethics 1 (4):242-245.
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  23. C. Agathangelou (1998). Book Review: Health Promotion: Philosophy, Prejudice and Practice. [REVIEW] Nursing Ethics 5 (3):268-268.
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  24. C. Agathangelou (1998). Book Review: Moral Matters: Ethical Issues in Medicine and the Life Sciences. [REVIEW] Nursing Ethics 5 (3):266-267.
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  25. C. Agathangelou (1997). Book Review: The Need for Health Care. [REVIEW] Nursing Ethics 4 (3):257-258.
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  26. C. Agathangelou (1997). Shaeff R, The Need for Health Care. Nursing Ethics 4 (3):257-257.
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  27. C. Agathangelou (1996). Book Reviews: Benner P Ed. 1994: Interpretive Phenomenology: Embodiment, Caring and Ethics in Health and Illness. London: Sage. 372 Pp. 42.50 . ISBN 0 8039 5722 X; 19.95 . ISBN 0 8039 5728 8. [REVIEW] Nursing Ethics 3 (3):277-278.
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  28. C. Agathangelou (1996). Book Reviews: Raya A 1995: Basike Noseleytike . Athens: A Raya. 294 Pp. GrDr 5000 . ISBN 960 90031 0 9. [REVIEW] Nursing Ethics 3 (4):369-369.
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  29. George J. Agich (2016). Ethical Theory and Clinical Ethics Consultation: Toward Understanding the Relationship. American Journal of Bioethics 16 (9):36-37.
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  30. George J. Agich (2016). Truth in Advertising: Reasonable Versus Unreasonable Claims About Improving Ethics Consultation. American Journal of Bioethics 16 (3):25-26.
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  31. George J. Agich (2010). Why I Wrote … Dependence and Autonomy in Old Age. Clinical Ethics 5 (2):108-110.
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  32. George J. Agich (2009). Why Quality Is Addressed So Rarely in Clinical Ethics Consultation. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 18 (4):339.
    In a practice like ethics consultation, quality and accountability are intertwined. Critics of ethics consultation have complained that clinical ethics consultants exercise power or influence in patient care without sufficient external oversight. Without oversight or external accountability, ethics consultation is seen as more sophistical than philosophical. Although there has been more discussion of accountability, concern for quality in ethics consultation is arguably more important, because it represents a central challenge for the field, namely, how to structure a responsible practice of (...)
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  33. George J. Agich (2007). Review of Linda Farber Post, Jeffrey Blustein, and Nancy Neveloff Dubler, Handbook for Healthcare Ethics Committees. [REVIEW] American Journal of Bioethics 7 (6):66-67.
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  34. George J. Agich (2005). What Kind of Doing is Clinical Ethics? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 26 (1):7-24.
    This paper discusses the importance of Richard M. Zaners work on clinical ethics for answering the question: what kind of doing is ethics consultation? The paper argues first, that four common approaches to clinical ethics – applied ethics, casuistry, principlism, and conflict resolution – cannot adequately address the nature of the activity that makes up clinical ethics; second, that understanding the practical character of clinical ethics is critically important for the field; and third, that the practice of clinical ethics is (...)
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  35. George J. Agich (2003). Joining the Team: Ethics Consultation at the Cleveland Clinic. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 15 (4):310-322.
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  36. George J. Agich (2001). Ethics and Innovation in Medicine. Journal of Medical Ethics 27 (5):295-296.
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  37. George J. Agich (2001). The Question of Method in Ethics Consultation. American Journal of Bioethics 1 (4):31 – 41.
    This paper offers an exposition of what the question of method in ethics consultation involves under two conditions: when ethics consultation is regarded as a practice and when the question of method is treated systematically. It discusses the concept of the practice and the importance of rules in constituting the actions, cognition, and perceptions of practitioners. The main body of the paper focuses on three elements of the question of method: canon, discipline, and history, which are treated heuristically to outline (...)
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  38. George J. Agich (2001). The Salience of Narrative for Bioethics. American Journal of Bioethics 1 (1):50-50.
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  39. George J. Agich (2000). Organizing Ethics. Hastings Center Report 30 (6):46-47.
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  40. George J. Agich (1999). Response to “From Pittsburgh to Cleveland: NHBD Controversies and Bioethics” by George J. Agich (CQ Vol 8, No 3). Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (4):517-523.
    Frank Koughan and Walt Bogdanich's response to my article, reminds me of the Shakespearean line, My article was not about the specifics of the 60Minutes April 13, 1997, story on NHBD at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation (CCF), even though the story formed the basis for the reflection. I did not attack the critics, though I do believe that bioethicists are accountable for their scholarly and public pronouncements. Although I do not see why the 60Minutes' story should be treated with deference, (...)
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  41. George J. Agich (1999). The Importance of Management for Understanding Managed Care. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 24 (5):518-534.
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  42. George J. Agich (1999). From Pittsburgh to Cleveland: NHBD Controversies and Bioethics. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (3):269-274.
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  43. George J. Agich (1999). Response to “From Pittsburgh to Cleveland: NHBD Controversies and Bioethics” by George J. Agich (CQ Vol 8, No 3)Say It Ain't So: 60 Minutes on NHBD. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (4):517-523.
    Frank Koughan and Walt Bogdanich's response to my article, “From Pittsburgh to Cleveland: NHBD Controversies and Bioethics,” reminds me of the Shakespearean line, “The lady protests too much, methinks.” My article was not about the specifics of the 60 Minutes April 13, 1997, story on NHBD at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation , even though the story formed the basis for the reflection. I did not attack the critics, though I do believe that bioethicists are accountable for their scholarly and public (...)
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  44. George J. Agich (1994). Expertise in Clinical Ethics Consultation. HEC Forum 6 (6):379-383.
  45. George J. Agich (1990). Medicine as Business and Profession. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 11 (4).
    This paper analyzes one dimension of the frequently alleged contradiction between treating medicine as a business and as a profession, namely the incompatibility between viewing the physician patient relationship in economic and moral terms. The paper explores the utilitarian foundations of economics and the deontological foundations of professional medical ethics as one source for the business/medicine conflict that influences beliefs about the proper understanding of the therapeutic relationship. It, then, focuses on the contrast and distinction between medicine as business and (...)
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  46. George J. Agich (1990). Reassessing Autonomy in Long‐Term Care. Hastings Center Report 20 (6):12-17.
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  47. George J. Agich (1987). Incentives and Obligations Under Prospective Payment. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 12 (2):123-144.
    In this paper I analyze the alleged conflict between economic incentives to efficiently utilize health care resources and the obligation to provide patients with the best possible medical care. My analysis is developed in four stages. First, I discuss briefly the nature of prospective payment systems and economic incentives as well as the issue of professional autonomy. Second, I disscuss the notion of an incentive for action both as an economic incentive and as a concept of moral psychology. Third, I (...)
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  48. George J. Agich (1985). Roles and Responsibilities: Theoretical Issues in the Definition of Consultation Liaison Psychiatry. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 10 (2):105-126.
    Central to much medical ethical analysis is the concept of the role of the physician. While this concept plays an important role in medical ethics, its function is largely tacit. The present paper attempts to bring the concept of a social role to prominence by focusing on an historically recent and rather richly contextured role, namely, that of consultation liaison psychiatry. Since my intention is primarily theoretical, I largely ignore the empirical studies which purport to develop the detailed functioning of (...)
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  49. George J. Agich (1980). Professionalism and Ethics in Health Care. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 5 (3):186-199.
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  50. George J. Agich & Heidi Forster (2000). Conflicts of Interest and Management in Managed Care. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 9 (2):189-204.
    The bioethics literature on managed care has devoted significant attention to a broad range of conflicts that managed care is perceived to have introduced into the practice of medicine. In the first part of this paper we discuss three kinds of conflict of interest: conflicts of economic incentives, conflicts with patient and physician autonomy, and conflicts with the fiduciary character of the physician–patient relationship. We argue that the conflicts are either not as serious as they are often alleged to be (...)
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