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  1. Archivos de la Categoría 'Vision Sobre la Ciencia y El Arte En El Caribe.'.Mensaje de la Dra Mirta Roses & Crics En Imágenes - forthcoming - Bioethics.
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  2. Contents of Unconscious Color Perception.Błażej Skrzypulec - forthcoming - Review of Philosophy and Psychology:1-17.
    In the contemporary discussions concerning unconscious perception it is not uncommon to postulate that content and phenomenal character are ‘orthogonal’, i.e., there is no type of content which is essentially conscious, but instead, every representational content can be either conscious or not. Furthermore, this is not merely treated as a thesis justified by theoretical investigations, but as supported by empirical considerations concerning the actual functioning of the human cognition. In this paper, I address unconscious color perception and argue for a (...)
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  3. Is Blindsight Possible Under Signal Detection Theory? Comment on Phillips (2021).Matthias Michel & Hakwan Lau - 2021 - Psychological Review 128 (3):585-591.
    Phillips argues that blindsight is due to response criterion artefacts under degraded conscious vision. His view provides alternative explanations for some studies, but may not work well when one considers several key findings in conjunction. Empirically, not all criterion effects are decidedly non-perceptual. Awareness is not completely abolished for some stimuli, in some patients. But in other cases, it was clearly impaired relative to the corresponding visual sensitivity. This relative dissociation is what makes blindsight so important and interesting.
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  4. Masked Blindsight in Normal Observers: Measuring Subjective and Objective Responses to Two Features of Each Stimulus.Mika Koivisto & Susanna Neuvonen - 2020 - Consciousness and Cognition 81:102929.
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  5. The Role of Experience in Demonstrative Thought.Michael Barkasi - 2019 - Mind and Language 34 (5):648-666.
    Attention plays a role in demonstrative thought: It sets the targets. Visual experience also plays a role. I argue here that it makes visual information available for use in the voluntary control of focal attention. To do so I use both introspection and neurophysiological evidence from projections between areas of attentional control and neural correlates of consciousness. Campbell and Smithies also identify roles for experience, but they further argue that only experience can play those roles. In contrast, I argue that (...)
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  6. The Idea of the World: A Multi-Disciplinary Argument for the Mental Nature of Reality.Bernardo Kastrup - 2019 - Winchester, UK: Iff Books.
    The Idea of the World offers a grounded alternative to the frenzy of unrestrained abstractions and unexamined assumptions in philosophy and science today. This book examines what can be learned about the nature of reality based on conceptual parsimony, straightforward logic and empirical evidence from fields as diverse as physics and neuroscience. It compiles an overarching case for idealism - the notion that reality is essentially mental - from ten original articles the author has previously published in leading academic journals. (...)
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  7. Naïve Realism and Unconscious Perception: A Reply to Berger and Nanay.Alfonso Anaya & Sam Clarke - 2017 - Analysis 77 (2):267-273.
    In a recent paper, Berger and Nanay consider, and reject, three ways of addressing the phenomenon of unconscious perception within a naïve realist framework. Since these three approaches seem to exhaust the options open to naïve realists, and since there is said to be excellent evidence that perception of the same fundamental kind can occur, both consciously and unconsciously, this is seen to present a problem for the view. We take this opportunity to show that all three approaches considered remain (...)
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  8. Corrigendum to “Speeded Manual Responses to Unseen Visual Stimuli in Hemianopic Patients: What Kind of Blindsight?” [Conscious Cogn. 32 6–14]. [REVIEW]Alessia Celeghin, Marissa Barabas, Francesca Mancini, Matteo Bendini, Emilio Pedrotti, Massimo Prior, Anna Cantagallo, Silvia Savazzi & Carlo A. Marzi - 2017 - Consciousness and Cognition 48:292.
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  9. Representationalism and Blindsight.Graham Peebles - 2017 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 8 (3):541-556.
    According to representationalism, phenomenal character supervenes on representational content. According to first-person reports, blindsighters have no phenomenal character in the scotoma, even though their abilities suggest that they have conscious visual representations in the scotoma. The traditional representationalist response is that the representations in the scotoma are either non-conscious or non-visual. Drawing on empirical work, I consider the interpretation that blindsighters are unable to represent—and thus lack the phenomenal character of—luminance in the scotoma. However, they maintain the capacity to represent (...)
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  10. Corrigendum to “Speeded Manual Responses to Unseen Visual Stimuli in Hemianopic Patients: What Kind of Blindsight?” [Conscious Cogn. 32 6–14]. [REVIEW]Alessia Celeghin, Marissa Barabas, Francesca Mancini, Matteo Bendini, Emilio Pedrotti, Massimo Prior, Anna Cantagallo, Silvia Savazzi & Carlo A. Marzi - 2016 - Consciousness and Cognition 46:188.
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  11. Reid’s Account of the “Geometry of Visibles”: Some Lessons From Helmholtz.Lorne Falkenstein - 2016 - Topoi 35 (2):485-510.
    Drawing on work done by Helmholtz, I argue that Reid was in no position to infer that objects appear as if projected on the inner surface of a sphere, or that they have the geometric properties of such projections even though they do not look concave towards the eye. A careful consideration of the phenomena of visual experience, as further illuminated by the practice of visual artists, should have led him to conclude that the sides of visible appearances either look (...)
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  12. “Towards a New Theory of Vision” Revisited.Jan Koenderink - 2016 - Topoi 35 (2):571-581.
    I consider the geometrical structure of the apparent visual field. Although the optics of vision is well understood, the nature of visual awareness remains largely in the dark. A famous attempt at a formal description of the apparent visual field was by Helmholtz, in the late nineteenth century. It purportedly explains the phenomenon of the subjective curvatures often reported when viewing objectively straight lines of great extent. I consider the general problem, and suggest an alternative formal account. On phenomenological grounds (...)
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  13. Consciousness and Criterion: On Block's Case for Unconscious Seeing.Ian Phillips - 2016 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 93 (2):419-451.
    Block () highlights two experimental studies of neglect patients which, he contends, provide ‘dramatic evidence’ for unconscious seeing. In Block's hands this is the highly non-trivial thesis that seeing of the same fundamental kind as ordinary conscious seeing can occur outside of phenomenal consciousness. Block's case for it provides an excellent opportunity to consider a large body of research on clinical syndromes widely held to evidence unconscious perception. I begin by considering in detail the two studies of neglect to which (...)
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  14. Variations in the Anisotropy and Affine Structure of Visual Space: A Geometry of Visibles with a Third Dimension.Mark Wagner & Anthony J. Gambino - 2016 - Topoi 35 (2):583-598.
    A meta-analysis and an experiment show that the degree of compression of the in-depth dimension of visual space relative to the frontal dimension increases quickly as a function of the distance between the stimulus and the observer at first, but the rate of change slows beyond 7 m from the observer, reaching an apparent asymptote of about 50 %. In addition, the compression of visual space is greater for monocular and reduced cue conditions. The pattern of compression of the in-depth (...)
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  15. Quantitative Assessment of Visual Cortex Function with fMRI at 7 Tesla—Test–Retest Variability.Aini Ismafairus Abd Hamid, Oliver Speck & Michael B. Hoffmann - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  16. Can SSRIs Enhance Human Visual Cortex Plasticity?Lagas Alice, Black Joanna, Stinear Cathy, Byblow Winston, Phillips Geraint, Russel Bruce, Kydd Robert & Thompson Benjamin - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  17. Absolute and Relative Blindsight.Tarryn Balsdon & Paul Azzopardi - 2015 - Consciousness and Cognition 32:79-91.
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  18. Prediction of Vision From Invisible Stimuli.Jack Bradley - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  19. Extrastriate Visual Cortex Reorganizes Despite Sequential Bilateral Occipital Stroke: Implications for Vision Recovery.Amy Brodtmann, Aina Puce, David Darby & Geoffrey Donnan - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  20. Type 2 Blindsight and the Nature of Visual Experience.Berit Brogaard - 2015 - Consciousness and Cognition 32:92-103.
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  21. Speeded Manual Responses to Unseen Visual Stimuli in Hemianopic Patients: What Kind of Blindsight?Alessia Celeghin, Marissa Barabas, Francesca Mancini, Matteo Bendini, Emilio Pedrotti, Massimo Prior, Anna Cantagallo, Silvia Savazzi & Carlo A. Marzi - 2015 - Consciousness and Cognition 32:6-14.
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  22. From Affective Blindsight to Emotional Consciousness.Alessia Celeghin, Beatrice de Gelder & Marco Tamietto - 2015 - Consciousness and Cognition 36:414-425.
  23. Task Demands Modulate the Effects of Perceptual Expectations in Early Visual Cortex.St John-Saaltink Elexa, Utzerath Christian, Kok Peter, Lau Hakwan & De Lange Floris - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  24. The Case for Characterising Type-2 Blindsight as a Genuinely Visual Phenomenon.Robert Foley - 2015 - Consciousness and Cognition 32:56-67.
  25. Type-2 Blindsight: Empirical and Philosophical Perspectives.Robert Foley & Robert W. Kentridge - 2015 - Consciousness and Cognition 32:1-5.
  26. What is It Like to Have Type-2 Blindsight? Drawing Inferences From Residual Function in Type-1 Blindsight.Robert W. Kentridge - 2015 - Consciousness and Cognition 32:41-44.
  27. The Structure of Experience, the Nature of the Visual, and Type 2 Blindsight‌.Fiona Macpherson - 2015 - Consciousness and Cognition 32:104 - 128.
    Unlike those with type 1 blindsight, people who have type 2 blindsight have some sort of consciousness of the stimuli in their blind field. What is the nature of that consciousness? Is it visual experience? I address these questions by considering whether we can establish the existence of any structural—necessary—features of visual experience. I argue that it is very difficult to establish the existence of any such features. In particular, I investigate whether it is possible to visually, or more generally (...)
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  28. Reconciling Current Approaches to Blindsight.Morten Overgaard & Jesper Mogensen - 2015 - Consciousness and Cognition 32:33-40.
  29. Audiovisual Association Learning in the Absence of Primary Visual Cortex.Mehrdad Seirafi, Peter De Weerd, Alan J. Pegna & Beatrice de Gelder - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  30. Why is “Blindsight” Blind? A New Perspective on Primary Visual Cortex, Recurrent Activity and Visual Awareness.Juha Silvanto - 2015 - Consciousness and Cognition 32:15-32.
  31. Facial Blindsight.Marco Solcà, Adrian G. Guggisberg, Armin Schnider & Béatrice Leemann - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  32. Beauty and the Beholder: The Role of Visual Sensitivity in Visual Preference.Branka Spehar, Solomon Wong, Sarah van de Klundert, Jessie Lui, Colin W. G. Clifford & Richard P. Taylor - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  33. Unconscious Influences on Decision Making in Blindsight.Berit Brogaard, Kristian Marlow & Kevin Rice - 2014 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (1):22-23.
  34. Orientation-Specific Surround Suppression in the Primary Visual Cortex Varies as a Function of Autistic Tendency.Anastasia V. Flevaris & Scott O. Murray - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  35. Exploring Ethical Frontiers of Visual Methods.Catherine Howell, Susan Cox, Sarah Drew, Marilys Guillemin, Deborah Warr & Jenny Waycott - 2014 - Research Ethics 10 (4):208-213.
    Visual research is a fast-growing interdisciplinary field. The flexibility and diversity of visual research methods are seen as strengths by their adherents, yet adoption of such approaches often requires researchers to negotiate complex ethical terrain. The digital technological explosion has also provided visual researchers with access to an increasingly diverse array of visual methodologies and tools that, far from being ethically neutral, require careful deliberation and planning for use. To explore these issues, the Symposium on Exploring Ethical Frontiers of Visual (...)
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  36. Asymmetrical Color Filling-in From the Nasal to the Temporal Side of the Blind Spot.Hui Li, Junxiang Luo, Yiliang Lu, Janis Kan, Lothar Spillmann & Wei Wang - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  37. Repetition Suppression in Macaque Superior Temporal Sulcus for Dynamic Visual Stimuli Depicting Hand Actions.Kuravi Pradeep, Caggiano Vittorio, Giese Martin & Vogels Rufin - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  38. EEG Markers of Visually Experienced Self-Motion.Barry Robert, Palmisano Stephen, Schira Mark, De Blasio Frances, Karamacoska Diana & MacDonald Brett - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  39. Parallel Processing of Face and House Stimuli by V1 and Specialized Visual Areas: A Magnetoencephalographic Study.Yoshihito Shigihara & Semir Zeki - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  40. More Than Meets the Eye: Implicit Perception in Legally Blind Individuals.Alan S. Brown, Michael R. Best & David B. Mitchell - 2013 - Consciousness and Cognition 22 (3):996-1002.
    Legally blind participants were able to identify a visual stimulus attribute in the absence of consciously identifying its presence. Specifically, participants—with their corrective lenses removed—correctly guessed the hour-hand position above chance on a clockface shown on a computer screen. This occurred both when presented in a 1-clockface display , as well as when shown a display containing 4 clockfaces , in which only 1 face contained a hand. Even more striking, hand identification accuracy in the 4-clockface condition was comparable whether (...)
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  41. The Visual Mismatch Negativity Elicited with Visual Speech Stimuli.Benjamin T. Files, Edward T. Auer & Lynne E. Bernstein - 2013 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  42. Testing for Optic Ataxia in a Blind Field.Aarlenne Z. Khan, Laure Pisella, Ludovic Delporte, Gilles Rode & Yves Rossetti - 2013 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  43. Motion Words Selectively Modulate Direction Discrimination Sensitivity for Threshold Motion.Andrea Pavan, Māris Skujevskis & Giosuè Baggio - 2013 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  44. The Blind Spot of Consciousness. [REVIEW]Tudor Cosma Purnavel - 2013 - Meta: Research in Hermeneutics, Phenomenology, and Practical Philosophy 5 (2):435-438.
  45. Oblique Effect in Visual Mismatch Negativity.Endre Takács, István Sulykos, István Czigler, Irén Barkaszi & László Balázs - 2013 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  46. Non-Visual Consciousness and Visual Images in Blindsight.Berit Brogaard - 2012 - Consciousness and Cognition 21 (1):595-596.
    In a recent response paper to Brogaard (2011a), Morten Overgaard and Thor Grünbaum argue that my case for the claim that blindsight subjects are not visually conscious of the stimuli they correctly identify rests on a mistaken necessary criterion for determining whether a conscious experience is visual or non-visual. Here I elaborate on the earlier argu- ment while conceding that the question of whether blindsight subjects are visually con- scious of the visual stimuli they correctly identify largely is an empirical (...)
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  47. Are There Unconscious Perceptual Processes?Berit Brogaard - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (2):449-63.
    Blindsight and vision for action seem to be exemplars of unconscious visual processes. However, researchers have recently argued that blindsight is not really a kind of uncon- scious vision but is rather severely degraded conscious vision. Morten Overgaard and col- leagues have recently developed new methods for measuring the visibility of visual stimuli. Studies using these methods show that reported clarity of visual stimuli correlates with accuracy in both normal individuals and blindsight patients. Vision for action has also come under (...)
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  48. Color Experience in Blindsight?Berit Brogaard - 2011 - Philosophical Psychology 24 (6):767 - 786.
    Blindsight, the ability to blindly discriminate wavelength and other aspects of stimuli in a blind field, sometimes occurs in people with lesions to striate (V1) cortex. There is currently no consensus on whether qualitative color information of the sort that is normally computed by double opponent cells in striate cortex is indeed computed in blindsight but doesn?t reach awareness, perhaps owing to abnormal neuron responsiveness in striate or extra-striate cortical areas, or is not computed at all. The existence of primesight, (...)
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  49. Visual Experience and Blindsight: A Methodological Review.Morten Overgaard - 2011 - Experimental Brain Research 209:473-479.
    Blindsight is classically defined as residual visual capacity, e.g., to detect and identify visual stimuli, in the total absence of perceptual awareness following lesions to V1. However, whereas most experiments have investigated what blindsight patients can and cannot do, the literature contains several, often contradictory, remarks about remaining visual experience. This review examines closer these remarks as well as experiments that directly approach the nature of possibly spared visual experiences in blindsight.
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  50. Consciousness and Modality: On the Possible Preserved Visual Consciousness in Blindsight Subjects.Morten Overgaard & Thor Grünbaum - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1855-1859.
    In a recent paper, Brogaard presents counter-arguments to the conclusions of an experiment with blindsight subject GR. She argues that contrary to the apparent findings that GR’s preserved visual abilities relate to degraded visual experiences, she is in fact fully unconscious of the stimuli she correctly identifies. In this paper, we present arguments and evidence why Brogaard’s argument does not succeed in its purpose. We suggest that not only is relevant empirical evidence in opposition to Brogaard’s argument, her argument misconstrues (...)
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